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Going back to my year-old TCM recordings, I watched "Stars in My Crown".

 

It legit upset me.  The setting is Tennessee not long after the Civil War, and Joel McCrea is a veteran who has become a preacher and settles down as preacher in a small town.  There's this one character called Uncle Famous, who is a freed slave, a gentle fellow, liked by all.  Plot developments eventually have the Klan come with ropes to hang him.  Luckily, Joel McCrea the preacher shows up, and shames the whole mob into remembering what a good friend Uncle Famous was to them when they were growing up.  So the Klansmen all go home.

 

I watched that whole scene and thought that in real post-war Tennessee, not only would they have lynched him, they would have taken pictures and souvenirs.

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22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

**IRONICALLY, all the kids in A CHRISTMAS STORY (1984) audibly GROAN at the mention of reading SILAS MARNER by GEORGE ELIOT for their class, but I think it is a marvelous little novel, the one thing that ELIOT wrote that is not too high fallutin to make it digestible to everyone, in fact, I think it would actually be a great reading assignment for a grade school class.

I always thought Silas Marner was wasted on anyone younger than college age.  Most grade school and even high school students can't read at the level to comprehend Eliot nowadays.

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27 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I always thought Silas Marner was wasted on anyone younger than college age.  Most grade school and even high school students can't read at the level to comprehend Eliot nowadays.

well, to be fair, Eliot is awfully high fallutin, she also has a tendency to quote Latin and classical sayings in other languages A LOT which- depending on the edition you're reading- may or may not be translated for you on the same page [OR EVEN AT ALL]. I know at least half of DANIEL DERONDA [ a book that i like to think of as "an 800 page short story"] is quotes of Ovid and Cicero and Dante...I'm still a little surprised at myself for making it through that one!

ELIOT and DICKENS are maybe the only two GREAT BRITISH AUTHORS whom I can maybe excuse reading in an abridged edition....

 

(that said, THE MILL ON THE FLOSS is one of my top ten favorite novels EVER)

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On 5/30/2021 at 9:03 PM, HoldenIsHere said:

Yes, KIDS is a very powerful --- and very disturbing film ---  that chronicles the experiences of a group of New York City teenagers during a single day. And sexual promiscuity figures prominently in their story. 

You may already know this, misswonderly, but Harmony Korine wrote the screenplay for KIDS, but the movie was directed by Larry Clark.

Although some viewers believed (believe) the movie  was largely improvised, Harmony Kormine has said the movie was entirely scripted except for the scene at the end when Casper wakes up on the couch and says "Jesus Christ, what happened?"    ******* SPOLIERS BELOW**********

*********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

. . . after unknowingly the night before exposing himself to HIV by having sex  with (or more accurately  r a p i n g) a girl passed out on the couch, who  had tested HIV positive earlier that day.

 

 

 

Love Kids.  Probably the only film by HK that I do like.  I did a few presentation on this film back in film school.  Sad to learn of the fate of many of the kid 'actors' involved in the film.

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From the long weekend:

Captain Horatio Hornblower (1951) Enjoyed this.  Makes me long more and more for a sequel to Master and Commander.

Metropolitan (1990) Really like this film and hadn't watched it in over 5 years.   Need to find the DVD.

Troy (2004) Wifey and I watched this after we just watched the 2018 BBC/Netflix series Troy: Fall of a City and loved it (not sure what the critics were thinking) but man, this film is God-awful.  We were laughing out loud at Achilles' (Brad Pitt's) death scene.  So bad.  So very very bad.

Act of Violence (1949) and Journey into Fear (1943) Noir Alley double feature.  Second time watching Journey into Fear and it's becoming a favorite noir film of mine.

Unhinged (2020) Bit disturbing but found the story unbelievable.  Would never have recognized Russell Crowe.  

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19 hours ago, Vidor said:

Going back to my year-old TCM recordings, I watched "Stars in My Crown".

 

It legit upset me.  The setting is Tennessee not long after the Civil War, and Joel McCrea is a veteran who has become a preacher and settles down as preacher in a small town.  There's this one character called Uncle Famous, who is a freed slave, a gentle fellow, liked by all.  Plot developments eventually have the **** come with ropes to hang him.  Luckily, Joel McCrea the preacher shows up, and shames the whole mob into remembering what a good friend Uncle Famous was to them when they were growing up.  So the Klansmen all go home.

 

I watched that whole scene and thought that in real post-war Tennessee, not only would they have lynched him, they would have taken pictures and souvenirs.

I absolutely love STARS IN MY CROWN, but I understand how you can feel that way  through the lens of (The very) recent series of (unfortunate) events.

Nonetheless it’s a very rare movie from the 1950s that, for me, tackles the subject of race (And faith) in a 100% correct way.

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ELIOT and DICKENS are maybe the only two GREAT BRITISH AUTHORS whom I can maybe excuse reading in an abridged edition....

 

I'll go a big step beyond and admit I love them best acted out in a nice BBC miniseries.  I had read and loved, "Middlemarch" and "Silas Marner" both before seeing them  on Masterpiece,  but I loved them even more afterward.  Ben Kingsley was perfect as Silas.  I have a vague memory of seeing some version of "The Mill on the Floss."  Now I need to actually read that one.

I just watched,  "The Bad Seed. '  Holy moly.

The acting, by everyone, was mesmerizing, even the mother whose physical acting was over the top for me, was still pretty awesome, but the one who left me an emotional wreck was Eileen Heckart as the grieving mother of the drowned little boy.  She has to play crushed by grief at the same time as playing drunk and she does it so well. I think she's fabulous.

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15 minutes ago, AndreaDoria said:

I'll go a big step beyond and admit I love them best acted out in a nice BBC miniseries.  I had read and loved, "Middlemarch" and "Silas Marner" both before seeing them  on Masterpiece,  but I loved them even more afterward.  Ben Kingsley was perfect as Silas.  I have a vague memory of seeing some version of "The Mill on the Floss."  Now I need to actually read that one.

I just watched,  "The Bad Seed. '  Holy moly.

The acting, by everyone, was mesmerizing, even the mother whose physical acting was over the top for me, was still pretty awesome, but the one who left me an emotional wreck was Eileen Heckart as the grieving mother of the drowned little boy.  She has to play crushed by grief at the same time as playing drunk and she does it so well. I think she's fabulous.

Heckart won a Golden Globe for it and was nominated for an Oscar.

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On 5/31/2021 at 12:38 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

my aborted screenplay adaptation of THE WOODLANDERS moved the time and place to WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA in the early 1950's, in fact I think I made one of the characters a Korean War vet...? It was a long time ago and I decided not to continue with adapting it as THE LYNCHPIN of the story is A SHOCKING TWIST that happens in the last act of the story, and I could totally  see said twist  happening in 1890, but not entirely in 1952. nonetheless, it is a GORGEOUS STORY and the ending will blow you away. it was HARDY'S FAVORITE among his own works. (doing  a modern update of THOMAS HARDY is nothing new by the way, there is a film called THE HI-LO COUNTRY that is a western retelling of FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD)

THE WELL-BELOVED is about an arrogant, well-to-do artist visiting an isolated English village. There, he meets a beautiful girl named AVICE (one of HArdy's best character names) He romances her, then decides she isn't good enough and leaves ("ghosting" her as the kids say nowadays). she marries a village man, has his child (a daughter named AVICE) and DIES.  In the ensuing years, the ARTIST returns and falls in love with THE SECOND AVICE and then YEARS LATER, he falls in love with her daughter, a THIRD AVICE. It's a really rich story and it borders on being supernatural...which to be honest with you, is something i would gladly explore were i to ever decide to write an adaptation of it.

(BTW, I am also a fan of GEORGE ELIOT and have had moments where I considered doing an update of ADAM BEDE in a similar manner_)

 

Yes, moving the story to western North Carolina is quite reasonable, though the shocking twist only works in Victorian times. Victorian propriety is deadly, which is very much the point. By the way, Proust was a great admirer of The Well-Beloved, a perverse story even by Hardy's standards.

Hardy almost always uses sex as a way to write about class, and class as a way to write about sex. The Woodlanders has interlocking love triangles, where no two people are social equals. Marty South is the poorest of the poor. She loves Giles Winterbourne (similar to Gabriel Oak in Far from the Madding Crowd). Grace is a little above Giles in class, but below the local doctor, who is lower than but has an affair with the lady of the manor.

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On 5/30/2021 at 7:50 PM, rosebette said:

I have the Wooodlanders on my Kindle and still haven't read it.  I read nearly all of Hardy's work for my Master's in English Lit.  He and George Eliot were my specialty.

I believe that Hardy was not only critiquing the English class system, but the double standard of sexual mores.   His novel Jude the Obscure also deals with the hypocrisy of Victorian sexual morals.

 

On 5/31/2021 at 2:44 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

**IRONICALLY, all the kids in A CHRISTMAS STORY (1984) audibly GROAN at the mention of reading SILAS MARNER by GEORGE ELIOT for their class, but I think it is a marvelous little novel, the one thing that ELIOT wrote that is not too high fallutin to make it digestible to everyone, in fact, I think it would actually be a great reading assignment for a grade school class.

I had thought that SILAS MARNER was the book being discussed in the scene in the English class in ORDINARY PEOPLE and re-watched the scene in order to reference it in a response to LHF's post in this thread . . . but I discovered that the class is actually discussing JUDE THE OBSCURE!

TEACHER  Now why don't we discuss some theory here.  Conrad, what's  your theory on Jude Fawley? Conrad? What's your theory on Jude Fawley?

CONRAD  Uh . . . uh . . .

TEACHER  You think he was powerless in the grip of circumstance or could he have helped himself?

CONRAD  I don't, uh -.  Powerless? I guess,  I guess he thought he was. Yeah.

JOEL  The guy was a real jerk! He was all hung up on what was the moral thing to do and it didn't make any sense.

TEACHER   I think that's a little too easy, Joel. Paul, what do you think?

PAUL (O.S.) I found the book really hard to follow.  I, I couldn't figure it out.

c3H8eB8.jpg

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Despicable Me (2010)

 

A sinister mastermind served by a horde of genetically-modified kernels of corn is denied a bank loan to finance his latest evil scheme and so must resort to theft to acquire a crucial piece of equipment. His plan relies on subverting three children to aid him. Will they be his undoing?

I approached this with low expectations and mixed feelings. I am not a fan of most modern animation but this surprised me by having a natural feel. I am a very easy mark for innocence but this overplayed its hand several times. I could have wished that some of the armaments were not quite so grotesquely inane but I lived through it. The minions must elicit some primal response or else they could not possibly seem so very cute.

I found the story itself reasonably interesting and decently told. I swear that I should know the voice actor for Gru's mother but I can not quite place her.

My recommendation is to watch this movie if it becomes available but I would not urge anyone to actively or expensively seek it out.

5.9/10

Source: 'Silly Gift Day' DVD from a certain little fuzzy.

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7 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Despicable Me (2010)

I swear that I should know the voice actor for Gru's mother but I can not quite place her.

That would be Dame Julie Andrews...

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22 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

That would be Dame Julie Andrews...

I thank you!

I knew it was one of those dames but I had the name: "Judith Anderson" stuck in my head and could not shift it.

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54 minutes ago, SansFin said:

I thank you!

I knew it was one of those dames but I had the name: "Judith Anderson" stuck in my head and could not shift it.

The thought of Judith Anderson as "How do you solve a problem like Maria?" and Julie Andrews as Mrs. Danvers has made my day!

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2 hours ago, kingrat said:

The thought of Judith Anderson as "How do you solve a problem like Maria?" and Julie Andrews as Mrs. Danvers has made my day!

The Sound of Music and Rebecca is the cross-over that I didn’t know I needed. 

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I absolutely love STARS IN MY CROWN, but I understand how you can feel that way  through the lens of (The very) recent series of (unfortunate) events.

Nonetheless it’s a very rare movie from the 1950s that, for me, tackles the subject of race (And faith) in a 100% correct way.

 

The thing that bothered me is that it worked.  If Joel McCrea pulls an Atticus Finch and makes a doomed stand for what's right, well, that would have been different.  

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18 hours ago, kingrat said:

Yes, moving the story to western North Carolina is quite reasonable, though the shocking twist only works in Victorian times. Victorian propriety is deadly, which is very much the point. By the way, Proust was a great admirer of The Well-Beloved, a perverse story even by Hardy's standards.

Hardy almost always uses sex as a way to write about class, and class as a way to write about sex. The Woodlanders has interlocking love triangles, where no two people are social equals. Marty South is the poorest of the poor. She loves Giles Winterbourne (similar to Gabriel Oak in Far from the Madding Crowd). Grace is a little above Giles in class, but below the local doctor, who is lower than but has an affair with the lady of the manor.

🌈👍🔥🌈💥💥🌈👍🔥💥💋💋💋💋💋💋

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16 hours ago, kingrat said:

The thought of Judith Anderson as "How do you solve a problem like Maria?" and Julie Andrews as Mrs. Danvers has made my day!

Fire.

That’s how you solve a problem like Maria: FIRE.


(And lots of it.)

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11 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

The thing that bothered me is that it worked.  If Joel McCrea pulls an Atticus Finch and makes a doomed stand for what's right, well, that would have been different.  

I know.

We were ALL  at least a little nicer and less cynical before *a certain someone* decided to go and make America “great again.”

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18 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

 

I had thought that SILAS MARNER was the book being discussed in the scene in the English class in ORDINARY PEOPLE and re-watched the scene in order to reference it in a response to LHF's post in this thread . . . but I discovered that the class is actually discussing JUDE THE OBSCURE!

TEACHER  Now why don't we discuss some theory here.  Conrad, what's  your theory on Jude Fawley? Conrad? What's your theory on Jude Fawley?

CONRAD  Uh . . . uh . . .

TEACHER  You think he was powerless in the grip of circumstance or could he have helped himself?

CONRAD  I don't, uh -.  Powerless? I guess,  I guess he thought he was. Yeah.

JOEL  The guy was a real jerk! He was all hung up on what was the moral thing to do and it didn't make any sense.

TEACHER   I think that's a little too easy, Joel. Paul, what do you think?

PAUL (O.S.) I found the book really hard to follow.  I, I couldn't figure it out.

c3H8eB8.jpg

JUDE is the ONLY Thomas Hardy novel that I absolutely did not like at all. And it’s strange because it’s the favorite of many. Damn to find out why.

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On 6/1/2021 at 1:55 PM, rosebette said:

I always thought Silas Marner was wasted on anyone younger than college age.  Most grade school and even high school students can't read at the level to comprehend Eliot nowadays.

I'm still not sure why it's given to grade-school students, aside from it having an "easy", ie. uncontroversial plot.

It even got a kids-TV Wishbone episode: 

 

In my middle-school English-lit experience, however, I had to sympathize with the Peanuts strip where Linus's book report on Edith Wharton's Ethan Frome consists of "Being a kid, I am unable to understand the issues experienced by anyone in this story."  ("Sometimes, you have to tell it like it is.")

 

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I hope that it is permitted that I reverse this a bit.

I have found the following list of movies has been added to my: Watchlist on: Amazon Prime Video. A cursory examination shows that some are due to be rotated off the service quite soon. 

I am hoping some here might advise me as to which ones I should definitely watch prior to their becoming unavailable. 

Condemned to Live (1935)
Cloudburst (1951)
The Mystery Man (1935)
British Intelligence (1940)
Beware of Ladies (1936)
The Crimes of Stephen Hawke (1936)
Trapped (1949)
Trade Winds (1938)
Heading for Heaven (1947)
Streamline Express (1935)
The President's Mystery (1936)
Devil's Cargo (1948)
A Fool's Advice (1932)

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5 hours ago, SansFin said:

I hope that it is permitted that I reverse this a bit.

I have found the following list of movies has been added to my: Watchlist on: Amazon Prime Video. A cursory examination shows that some are due to be rotated off the service quite soon. 

I am hoping some here might advise me as to which ones I should definitely watch prior to their becoming unavailable. 


Trade Winds (1938)
 

The only one I know is Trade Winds, and it's a lot of fun. This is the film where Joan Bennett goes brunette midway in the film, and it's such a good look for her that she stays brunette. Ann Sothern is fun, too. Fredric March makes a nice hero, Ralph Bellamy has a better-than-usual chance of getting a girl, and there's a cobra! There's a plot, too.

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My husband and I watched Brokeback Mountain on Showtime last night. We hadn't seen it in a few years, and in light of the recent discussions here I was struck by what a Hardyesque film it is, with uneducated characters living in a rural landscape which is all they know. Hardy is a master at writing stories of love which are, in spite of everything, big enough to be felt as tragedy, and Brokeback is Hardyesque in that way. Class differences are less marked in the United States than in Hardy's England, but Brokeback is also very much a film about class.

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