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13 minutes ago, Hibi said:

They used to have these at the end of the year. Is it now going to be a summer thing? Didnt realize it was on.

Delayed due to COVID by six months.   I would imagine they would like to get back on their original schedule.

 The 2019-2020 Tonys will be presented in September, 2021, some 15 months late.  When NY theaters reopen, they will have been dark for 18 months.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Delayed due to COVID by six months.   I would imagine they would like to get back on their original schedule.

 The 2019-2020 Tonys will be presented in September, 2021, some 15 months late.  When NY theaters reopen, they will have been dark for 18 months.

WOULDN'T IT BE FASCINATING IF (oops, caps lock) THE TONYS became the new HOT AWARDS SHOW as the OSCARS circle down the drain continues unabated....(I could see it happening, to be honest)

 

**i personally cannot think of a movie made in recent history that came close to touching the popularity of HAMILTON!

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

AN ARTICLE FROM GIZMODO ON THE BACKGROUNDS CONTAINS EVEN MORE PICS:

https://gizmodo.com/scooby-doo-backgrounds-sans-characters-are-simply-stunn-1586742838

also contains THIS LINK to about 50 IMAGES OF BACKGROUNDS FROM THE SERIES AND I WOULD POST THEM ALL IF I COULD:

http://secretfunspot.blogspot.com/2007/10/50-scooby-doo-background-paintings.html

Oh baby! This old coot is AWESOME!!!

https://www.cartoonbrew.com/disney/disneys-crankiest-veteran-is-still-cranky-and-thinks-walt-disney-was-a-****-79791.html

 

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2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Delayed due to COVID by six months.   I would imagine they would like to get back on their original schedule.

 The 2019-2020 Tonys will be presented in September, 2021, some 15 months late.  When NY theaters reopen, they will have been dark for 18 months.

Who will care at this point? (Tonys)

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

AN ARTICLE FROM GIZMODO ON THE BACKGROUNDS CONTAINS EVEN MORE PICS:

https://gizmodo.com/scooby-doo-backgrounds-sans-characters-are-simply-stunn-1586742838

also contains THIS LINK to about 50 IMAGES OF BACKGROUNDS FROM THE SERIES AND I WOULD POST THEM ALL IF I COULD:

http://secretfunspot.blogspot.com/2007/10/50-scooby-doo-background-paintings.html

How can you argue with this logic?!?!

Walt Peregoy on layout artist Ernie Nordli:

"Great artist. Very humble. So humble he committed suicide."

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The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (1966)
 

A dead con-man, swindler and all-around jerk will go to heaven only if he does a good deed in one day. He can not leave his crypt and so enlists his long-dead paramour to carry out his instructions as he watches on a crystal ball.

This movie may mean far more to a person who has more experience with the teen beach movies of the early 1960s. I found it sufficiently cutesy to watch the entire movie. The effects of the ghost-girl being variously-colored overlays wore thin quickly. The idea that her bikini is invisible is presented as those parts of her anatomy being completely transparent. I have read that the entire plotline of him needing to do a good deed and the ghost being present to influence events were added after the movie was considered completed. It shows. I feel that it is actually a better movie because of the additions. It would be woefully inane if it did not have those moments of near-humor.

Basil Rathbone is good as the greedy attorney who wishes to kill the other heirs. Boris Karloff is sufficiently amusing as the corpse. Jesse White is his usual erudite and sophisticated self. Harvey Lembeck is fully in character as he reprised his role as a biker in other beach movies. All of the songs are teeth-gnashingly idiotic but they are all relatively short.

4.8/10

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HBO Max seems to me a bit of a missed opportunity. I have access because HBO is part of the TV mid-range package around here (at no additional premium cost!) and much of what's on there is what can be found on HBO  on Demand on the TV, plus a mixture of stuff from Cartoon Network (including the vintage Looney Tunes and Tom and Jerry cartoons), a small sampling of frequent fliers on TCM, a soupçon of Criterion type titles and Japanese anime, and a smattering of shows, mostly from the 90s and 00s, of series that  ran on broadcast networks. (Without a Trace, Cold Case, The Wayans Brothers, The Nanny, Head of the Class, Friends, The Big Bang Theory,  The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Happy Endings, The New Adventures of Old Christine,  The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Everwood, The Middle, What I like About You, Gossip Girl, The West Wing, Whose Line is It Anyway, Wonder Woman, Roots, and my personal favorite the short-lived but deliciously entertaining Pushing Daisies.) All that said, it just doesn't feel like it matched the true depth of WB's library of about 7,000 films, and who knows how many TV shows. It feels surface level.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

WOULDN'T IT BE FASCINATING IF (oops, caps lock) THE TONYS became the new HOT AWARDS SHOW as the OSCARS circle down the drain continues unabated....(I could see it happening, to be honest)

The Tonys at least has a function that the Oscars spends more and more time ignoring (and spent all its time ignoring last year, when they couldn't put a decent screen in Union Station)--Namely, that the only reason we would tune into see showbiz people hug each other was to get a free preview pick of WHAT they were hugging each other about.

The Tony ceremony has pretty much existed from the beginning as a tourism plug to show excerpts from the big musicals (and plays, do they even do that anymore?)...And it would have made last year's Oscars a lot more watchable if we'd seen clips from the nominated movies that we'd, ahem, missed on streaming, rather than "Your performance inspired me..."

Of course, it would also help if Broadway musicals weren't sinking down the "Cult movies, gay cult movies, Gen-Z romance and ethnic NY'ers" drain either.  But at least they're voting on their OWN product, and not letting the snooty critics and Golden Globes write their nominations for them.

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20 hours ago, TomJH said:

I watched Dr. Renault's Secret tonight, never having seen it before. The makeup was fairly subdued yet obvious enough that, from J. Carrol Naish's first appearance in the film, the secret of the doctor was pretty obvious, I thought. Not a bad little film, with good performances from Naish and George Zucco (familiar as this kind of mad scientist role was for the Englishman), the film having a further slickness, despite its "B" programmer budget, from the handsome Fox "A" production sets upon which it was filmed, as well as first rate photography.

Fair take Tom. Naish's makeup was subtle I guess. Not as extreme as Acquanetta's in CAPTIVE WILD WOMAN. Too bad these films were from different studios. Acquanetta and Naish would have been very cute as a couple. 

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1 hour ago, Herman Bricks said:

Fair take Tom. Naish's makeup was subtle I guess. Not as extreme as Acquanetta's in CAPTIVE WILD WOMAN. Too bad these films were from different studios. Acquanetta and Naish would have been very cute as a couple. 

See the source image

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Herman, it's been a while since I saw this one, a minor effort, if I recall correctly. Of course the beast into man (or woman, in the case of Captive Wild Woman) theme goes right back to the silent era (Chaney's A Blind Bargain and another lost film called The Wizard) into the early talkies with Island of Lost Souls ("What is the law?"). Universal later got onto this same bandwagon, of course, with Werewolf of London and their big hit of 1941, The Wolf Man. Fox then decided to jump aboard this beastly train with Dr. Renault's Secret.

The gif below, as you probably know, is from House of Frankenstein. I guess that's the thing about being the Wolf Man. Why use an open door when you can smash through a windowed door.

swampthingy: House of Frankenstein (1944) | Classic horror movies, Horror  movie tattoos, Classic monster movies

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2 hours ago, EricJ said:

Of course, it would also help if Broadway musicals weren't sinking down the "Cult movies, gay cult movies, Gen-Z romance and ethnic NY'ers" drain either.

I thought Broadway was sinking down the drain of "vintage musical act repackages their catalog into a musical".

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3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

HBO Max seems to me a bit of a missed opportunity. I have access because HBO is part of the TV mid-range package around here (at no additional premium cost!) and much of what's on there is what can be found on HBO  on Demand on the TV, plus a mixture of stuff from Cartoon Network (including the vintage Looney Tunes and Tom and Jerry cartoons), a small sampling of frequent fliers on TCM, a soupçon of Criterion type titles and Japanese anime, and a smattering of shows, mostly from the 90s and 00s, of series that  ran on broadcast networks. (Without a Trace, Cold Case, The Wayans Brothers, The Nanny, Head of the Class, Friends, The Big Bang Theory,  The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Happy Endings, The New Adventures of Old Christine,  The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Everwood, The Middle, What I like About You, Gossip Girl, The West Wing, Whose Line is It Anyway, Wonder Woman, Roots, and my personal favorite the short-lived but deliciously entertaining Pushing Daisies.) All that said, it just doesn't feel like it matched the true depth of WB's library of about 7,000 films, and who knows how many TV shows. It feels surface level.

I feel that way about Netflix streaming. Not that good. Have you seen SUCCESSION. Rather good, There are two seasons on Max and a third will be airing around the end of the year. Recommended. I am finicky as hell about miniseries, so a recommendation from me is rare.

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12 minutes ago, laffite said:

I feel that way about Netflix streaming. Not that good. Have you seen SUCCESSION. Rather good, There are two seasons on Max and a third will be airing around the end of the year. Recommended. I am finicky as hell about miniseries, so a recommendation from me is rare.

I really dislike Netflix, They are operating under sort of a wild wild West code of morals, or complete and utter lack there of. Some of their original programs and acquisitions go toO far.
(ie INSATIABLE, CUTIES, 365 DAYS..)

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We had access to both: Netflix and: Hulu for six months as part of a promotional experiment. The stats showed that we spent more time attempting to find a program which was worth watching than we did actually watching programs. 

We had: CBS AllAccess as a paid subscription so that we could have a local channel. It changed of recent to: Paramount+. It is sad to say that the entire library of Paramount movies is not available but the choices are expanding at a slow but steady pace. Our primary interest is the vintage series. 

TubiTV and PlutoTV are both valuable resources for appropriate movies and series. They have commercials but often not to an onerous degree. 

I am sorry to say that the series which is at the top of my list to experience: Nanny and the Professor (1970-1971) seems to not be available on any streaming service at any price.

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1 hour ago, Fedya said:

I thought Broadway was sinking down the drain of "vintage musical act repackages their catalog into a musical".

No, that was a while ago, and "Beautiful" retired the jersey for now.  

Now they're so running out of gay cult films, they've been forced to pretend, with straight-drag comedies like Tootsie and Mrs. Doubtfire.

47 minutes ago, SansFin said:

I am sorry to say that the series which is at the top of my list to experience: Nanny and the Professor (1970-1971) seems to not be available on any streaming service at any price.

What??  Nanny isn't on Hulu anymore?    😮

Ah well, that was back before the Disney/Fox deal--Guess most of the Fox shows left Hulu after that, so the Irwin Allen trilogy (Lost in Space, Time Tunnel, Land of the Giants)  probably went with them.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I really dislike Netflix, They are operating under sort of a wild wild West code of morals, or complete and utter lack there of. Some of their original programs and acquisitions go toO far.
(ie INSATIABLE, CUTIES, 365 DAYS..)

Lol. I literally watch Netflix for Great British Baking Show and commercial-free Forensic Files. 

I also have: HBO Max (but not HBO because Dish dropped it), Hulu, Amazon Prime, Disney+, and Criterion. 

Surprisingly I watch things on all of them. My husband and I just started Wandavision on Disney+

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Never understood why anybody cared about the Tonys.  Only people who go on vacations to New York watch any of those shows.  How is that ceremony on TV?  Say what you will about the Oscars but it's at least possible for people to watch most of the movies nominated.

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10 hours ago, SansFin said:

We had access to both: Netflix and: Hulu for six months as part of a promotional experiment. The stats showed that we spent more time attempting to find a program which was worth watching than we did actually watching programs. 

Boy that statement sure fits this household as well. MrTiki has subscribed to Netflix & HBOMax and I maybe watch one program a month between the two of them. And it's usually after searching for a specific title. Forget browsing, it only makes me depressed to see all the junk out there.

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Last night I watched the old chestnut I WAS A MALE ORDER BRIDE '49 trying to get better acquainted with Ann Sheridan movies I haven't seen before. This one was a Paramount production, directed by Howard Hawks, starring Cary Grant along with Sheridan, so I had pretty high expectations.

This was a pretty fun little romp of a movie if you can suspend your disbelief. Grant is a French Officer with a British accent, Sheridan an American WAC given the task of driving Grant around war torn Germany directly after WW2 ended. They quarrel, they hate each other, they fall in love. I hated this so far.

They soon marry and then face the logistics of returning/emigrating to the US. Apparently, there was no provision for emigrating men, only "brides" so the rest of the movie is all the difficulties & indignities of Grant having to go through the process women had to endure. Near the end, they simply give up & try dressing Grant as a "bride" to gain transatlantic ship board. This was the only part I found amusing,  Grant's   frustrated resignation leads to the best laughs in the picture.

I'm sure this is a beloved film for most classic movie fans. But I found Sheridan more smug than the wisecracking girl-next-door I've come to enjoy from her WB movies.

IWasAMaleWarBride.jpg

 

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7 hours ago, Vidor said:

Never understood why anybody cared about the Tonys.  Only people who go on vacations to New York watch any of those shows.  How is that ceremony on TV?  Say what you will about the Oscars but it's at least possible for people to watch most of the movies nominated.

there is an absolutely MASSIVE contingency of THEATER KIDS in AMERICA- I have two nieces who are- and they listen to the soundtracks and they watch clips of the performances on youtube and they STAN the actors- trust me, it's more than a niche. especially since a lot of popular prohects like BEETLEJUICE and MEAN GIRLS got their own musical adaptations. and again, HAMILTON! was more of a NATIONAL phenomenon when it was on the stage than any film since AVATAR.

plus I am thinking the performances during the Tonys aren't lifeless, sucky and/or choreographed with innapropriate interpretations of the nominated productions by DEBBIE ALLEN, ,MICHAEL FLATLEY, PAULA ABDUL and/or STOMP.

 

PS- I ALSO NOTE that, although recent history has caused me to eat my own words many more times than I'd like, I do not think we will ever, EVER see GLENN CLOSE doin DA BUTT at THE TONYS.

**SO LONG AS THEY KEEP JAMES ****ING CORDEN THE ***AWAY FROM THE WHOLE DEAL.

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(all?) 17 episodes of the 1968 HANNA-BARBERA ADVENTURES OF BATMAN AND ROBIN CARTOON are on TUBI right now, and I highly recommend them if you're the mood for some delightfully batsh!t late 1960's whimsy. I do note that, that as is the case with their episodes of SCOOBY DOO, some are mislabeled with the wrong episode info, but they're all there nonetheless)

is it just me or does THE JOKER not look like MARY TYLER MOORE in her later years? (minus the Tonya Harding blue eyeshadow, which is a touch that I have to say I love):

See the source imageor is it more DICK NIXON?

Whereas I prattled on a page back about what a GREAT LOOKING cartoon the 68-69 SCOOBY-DOO cartoon was, I have to say: the same level of artistry is not there in the backgrounds, but, the voicework and the outright AUDACITY of the writers kinda makes up for it. also, the villains talk like EDWARD G ROBINSON and WC FIELDS and, in the case of THE RIDDLER, LENNY from OF MICE AND MEN. (I'm dead serious.)

BATGIRL is also there, and she's worked into things a bit better than she was on the TV SHOW. It was also was the first appearance of THE SCARECROW outside of the comic books, the episodes with this character in the 1990s animated series are among my favorites ever:

See the source image

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched the old chestnut I WAS A MALE ORDER BRIDE '49 trying to get better acquainted with Ann Sheridan movies I haven't seen before. This one was a Paramount production, directed by Howard Hawks, starring Cary Grant along with Sheridan, so I had pretty high expectations.

This was a pretty fun little romp of a movie if you can suspend your disbelief. Grant is a French Officer with a British accent, Sheridan an American WAC given the task of driving Grant around war torn Germany directly after WW2 ended. They quarrel, they hate each other, they fall in love. I hated this so far.

They soon marry and then face the logistics of returning/emigrating to the US. Apparently, there was no provision for emigrating men, only "brides" so the rest of the movie is all the difficulties & indignities of Grant having to go through the process women had to endure. Near the end, they simply give up & try dressing Grant as a "bride" to gain transatlantic ship board. This was the only part I found amusing,  Grant's   frustrated resignation leads to the best laughs in the picture.

I'm sure this is a beloved film for most classic movie fans. But I found Sheridan more smug than the wisecracking girl-next-door I've come to enjoy from her WB movies.

IWasAMaleWarBride.jpg

 

I have never much cared for this film either, despite the fact that it enjoys the prestige of being a Howard Hawks Cary Grant comedy. Seeing Grant in drag at the end is amusing but it's a long haul until we get to those few screen minutes. I'm a big Ann Sheridan fan (and she had a real flair for comedy, particularly of the tart tongued variety) but she was largely straight lady for Grant here and with her short curled hair and military uniform I thought she had a rather mannish appearance in this 20th Century Fox film, a real contrast to her previous films at Warner Brothers.

In an interview that she gave about a year and a half or so before her death, though, I Was A Male War Bride was one of the few films in her career of which Sheridan spoke positively. She loved working with Grant, saying he was one of the actors, along with Cagney and Flynn, with whom she had noteworthy on screen chemistry, and added that she and Grant had been looking for the right material for a screen reunion (which never happened).

Sadly I Was A Male War Bride was, I believe, the only box office hit that Sheridan enjoyed in her post Warners career (perhaps that's one of the reasons she spoke well of the film) and by 1957 her film work was over, and she would be seeking work on television the rest of her career.

Sheridan appeared in a lovely little bucolic drama in 1956, Come Next Spring, co-starring Steve Cochran. She said she had hopes this film might become a hit (and she badly needed one) but it was, unfortunately, poorly promoted by Republic and disappeared at the box office. It remains to this day a well acted affecting, sweet little tale of redemption (with a warmth brought to many of its scenes by Max Steiner's musical score) that relatively few have seen but is well worth seeking out. TCM showed it once, about a year ago or so.

Come Next Spring (1956) - IMDb

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18 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I have never much cared for this film either, despite the fact that it enjoys the prestige of being a Howard Hawks Cary Grant comedy. Seeing Grant in drag at the end is amusing but it's a long haul until we get to those few screen minutes. I'm a big Ann Sheridan fan (and she had a real flair for comedy, particularly of the tart tongued variety) but she was largely straight lady for Grant here and with her short curled hair and military uniform I thought she had a rather mannish appearance in this 20th Century Fox film, a real contrast to her previous films at Warner Brothers.

In an interview that she gave about a year and a half or so before her death, though, I Was A Male War Bride was one of the few films in her career of which Sheridan spoke positively. She loved working with Grant, saying he was one of the actors, along with Cagney and Flynn, with whom she had noteworthy on screen chemistry, and added that she and Grant had been looking for the right material for a screen reunion (which never happened).

Sadly I Was A Male War Bride was, I believe, the only box office hit that Sheridan enjoyed in her post Warners career (perhaps that's one of the reasons she spoke well of the film) and by 1957 her film work was over, and she would be seeking work on television the rest of her career.

Sheridan appeared in a lovely little bucolic drama in 1956, Come Next Spring, co-starring Steve Cochran. She said she had hopes this film might become a hit (and she badly needed one) but it was, unfortunately, poorly promoted by Republic and disappeared at the box office. It remains to this day a well acted affecting, sweet little tale of redemption (with a warmth brought to many of its scenes by Max Steiner's musical score) that relatively few have seen but is well worth seeking out. TCM showed it once, about a year ago or so.

Come Next Spring (1956) - IMDb

I hope TCM runs it again. I was only able to watch part of it.

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