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11 hours ago, Vidor said:

Never understood why anybody cared about the Tonys.  Only people who go on vacations to New York watch any of those shows.  

There are many millions of New Yorkers and suburbanites who go to the theater. And besides, televising the awards is supposed to encourage you all to come to New York and go to the theater. But as a New Yorker, I resent it when they try to put big movie stars on the Tony Award show, in the interests of getting national audience. They're out of place, unless they live locally, or have careers in the theater as well.

 

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(all?) 17 episodes of the 1968 HANNA-BARBERA ADVENTURES OF BATMAN AND ROBIN CARTOON are on TUBI right now, and I highly recommend them if you're the mood for some delightfully batsh!t late 1960's whimsy.

From the, er, large graphics you've been generous enough to give us  😣 , I first thought it was the hideous 70's Filmation version, but...no, H-B's was just as bad.  We even got a crossover New Scooby-Doo Movies episode, which I first thought was the gateway drug.

I'll confess I've been on a roll lately for finding hidden gold on Tubi, though--Thanks to its grungy-low-rent-basement image, it's the first place I go looking for only the most underground and psychotronic, and I even managed to stumble across a copy of The Gong Show Movie that Prime didn't have for free.  And the entire Cannon Pictures Fairytales, including the long-lost Amy Irving/Billy Barty Rumpelstiltskin, that had been missing from the MGM-orphan canon for a while now.)

5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

there is an absolutely MASSIVE contingency of THEATER KIDS in AMERICA- I have two nieces who are- and they listen to the soundtracks and they watch clips of the performances on youtube and they STAN the actors- trust me, it's more than a niche. especially since a lot of popular prohects like BEETLEJUICE and MEAN GIRLS got their own musical adaptations. and again, HAMILTON! was more of a NATIONAL phenomenon when it was on the stage than any film since AVATAR.

And like all who grew up watching WPIX-11 upstate during the pre-Koch 70's, some of continue to have faith that Broadway will someday be rescued from its own unions, budgets, gay-community tribalism and corporate-studio investors, and become the Third Wing of American Pop-Culture it once was.  
For every fangirl who karaokes "Popular" from Wicked, and thinks the entire world knows who Idina Menzel is, there is one of us who can discuss paragraphs about the Stephen Sondheim/Hal Prince years.

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3 hours ago, Swithin said:

There are many millions of New Yorkers and suburbanites who go to the theater.

 

Sounds like a good show for WOR then!  Just, you know, almost zero appeal for the rest of the country.

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19 hours ago, EricJ said:

No, that was a while ago, and "Beautiful" retired the jersey for now.  

Now they're so running out of gay cult films, they've been forced to pretend, with straight-drag comedies like Tootsie and Mrs. Doubtfire.

What??  Nanny isn't on Hulu anymore?    😮

Ah well, that was back before the Disney/Fox deal--Guess most of the Fox shows left Hulu after that, so the Irwin Allen trilogy (Lost in Space, Time Tunnel, Land of the Giants)  probably went with them.

Lost in Space is still up there as far as I know.....

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24 minutes ago, Vidor said:

 

Sounds like a good show for WOR then!  Just, you know, almost zero appeal for the rest of the country.

Hardly.

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

 

PS- I ALSO NOTE that, although recent history has caused me to eat my own words many more times than I'd like, I do not think we will ever, EVER see GLENN CLOSE doin DA BUTT at THE TONYS.

The other day that song was on the radeo in the car on Sirius XM's 80s on 8 station. I didn't stay to listen to it, but I immediately thought of Glenn Close.

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Just cued up the famous Ronald Reagan version of "The Killers".  He's quite excellent in this movie, makes one think that Warner Brothers screwed up by casting him as generic good guys.

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30 minutes ago, Vidor said:

Sounds like a good show for WOR then!  Just, you know, almost zero appeal for the rest of the country.

What IS WOR doing, nowadays?  Last time I watched it (in said pre-Koch upstate childhood, along with WPIX Chiller/Star Trek and WNEW Wonderama), Joe Franklin was still alive, and UHF stations still existed to cobble together the most random independent programming between Mets games.

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21 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I really dislike Netflix, They are operating under sort of a wild wild West code of morals, or complete and utter lack there of. Some of their original programs and acquisitions go toO far.
(ie INSATIABLE, CUTIES, 365 DAYS..)

They are just following the lead it feels of some of the programs FX, HBO, and Showtime once aired, although to me it seems way too over the top in how far they go. I typically only sign up for Netflix one month out of the year, just to see some of their "exclusives" that are up for Oscars, and that's about it. Most of the other films they have don't seem interesting and many of their programs don't seem like things I'd go for. (and one of the few regular network shows they have, Gilmore Girls, is one I have on DVD)

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44 minutes ago, Vidor said:

 

Sounds like a good show for WOR then!  Just, you know, almost zero appeal for the rest of the country.

They used to show the first hour on a local station, then two hours on a national station, but I think they gave that up.  The Olivier Awards, which are the British equivalent, are now shown on one of the cable channels occasionally, or streamed online.

I think you have a point, though. Theater is more for intellectual, upscale audiences mostly around New York; not for Dogpatch! Maybe they could be streamed for those few in the regions who are interested.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Swithin said:

They used to show the first hour on a local station, then two hours on a national station, but I think they gave that up.  The Olivier Awards, which are the British equivalent, are now shown on one of the cable channels occasionally, or streamed online.

I think you have a point, though. Theater is more for intellectual, upscale audiences mostly around New York; not for Dogpatch! Maybe they could be streamed for those few in the regions who are interested.

 

 

Most of this year's (or should I say last year's) Tony awards will be streamed on Paramount +.  I believe I read that only 3 awards will be shown on CBS.  The first two hours of awards are on Paramount+.  The last 2 hours on CBS is basically a concert staging of production numbers, etc.

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33 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

The other day that song was on the radeo in the car on Sirius XM's 80s on 8 station. I didn't stay to listen to it, but I immediately thought of Glenn Close.

OH MY GOD!!! I also listen to 80s on Sirius and a couple of days ago I also heard DA BUTT (around 2:00 or 3:oo pm east coast time) I LISTENED TO IT THOUGH.  
It’s entirely possible they worked it into regular rotation, since you and I live in different time zones, but just maybe, we shared the moment across the miles... 

Lets make it “our song”!!

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28 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

They are just following the lead it feels of some of the programs FX, HBO, and Showtime once aired, although to me it seems way too over the top in how far they go. I typically only sign up for Netflix one month out of the year, just to see some of their "exclusives" that are up for Oscars, and that's about it. Most of the other films they have don't seem interesting and many of their programs don't seem like things I'd go for. (and one of the few regular network shows they have, Gilmore Girls, is one I have on DVD)

Emily cussing aside, the GILMORE GIRLS revival sucked. 

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1 hour ago, Swithin said:

not for Dogpatch!

 

My goodness that's condescending.  It's not a matter of the rest of America being too dumb to appreciate theater, it's a matter of the rest of America being literally unable to see the works that compete in the Tonys.  Grammys, Emmys, Oscars--people have a chance to see that work.  Unless there's a movie, the only people who will see "The Ferryman" are New Yorkers.

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I watched Double Wedding last night on TCM;  This was the only William Powell \  Myrna Loy film I had not seen.     It had it moments but I found it to be only OK.   Of course how much the sudden death of Jean Harlow,  who was Powell's fiancée and Loy's close friend,  had on the two appears to have impacted the film (based on their own comments).

My view was that the Powell character was all-over-the-place;   yes,  he is a free spirited bohemian but then he would sometimes change persona into the type of sophisticated gentleman Powell screen persona.       In some ways this was necessary to ground the character,  but it just didn't work for me.    The Loy character just lacked charm.   The character was a no-nonsense harden gal and we often find such a female character in these type of romantic comedies but at some point (say halfway),  they lighten up.  The Loy character never does that even at the end.     (The Shop Around the Corner is a good example of the type of female character that does tone-it-down as the plot moves forward).

Some of the screwball comedy scenes worked but others fell flat.      

Still it was great for TCM to feature Florence Rice last night.    She made some good films during her fairly short film career.    

 

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13 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

My goodness that's condescending.  It's not a matter of the rest of America being too dumb to appreciate theater, it's a matter of the rest of America being literally unable to see the works that compete in the Tonys.  Grammys, Emmys, Oscars--people have a chance to see that work.  Unless there's a movie, the only people who will see "The Ferryman" are New Yorkers.

I saw The Ferryman in London, it was brilliant.  Some of the plays/musicals may actually travel to other parts of the USA, on tour. I believe a tour was planned for The Ferryman, to fourteen cities in the US and Canada, but Covid intervened.

Some people watch award shows without having seen (or heard) any of the nominees. I don't watch the Oscars as regularly as I used to, but I watched most of the show this year, without having seen (or wanting to see) any of the movies. There are young people all over this country who dream of going to the theater, and sometimes the Tony Awards show brings them closer to that dream. And it is after all history and education as well as, one hopes, entertainment.

And I never said that the residents of Dogpatch are dumb, But, to continue in a condescending vein, I wonder if, wherever you are, you have a thing called a "remote." It has buttons on it. If anyone doesn't want to watch the Tony Awards, they can press some of the  buttons, and other programs will appear!  😊

 

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12 hours ago, Vidor said:

My goodness that's condescending.  It's not a matter of the rest of America being too dumb to appreciate theater, it's a matter of the rest of America being literally unable to see the works that compete in the Tonys.

OK, I found "Dogpatch" to be kind of condescending too, but didn't take it to mean any more than "rural".  I see the Tonys as awarding & recognizing achievements in Theater. While the Heart of US Theater is "Broadway" (meaning NYC) if a show is popular, it may travel outside NYC- or better, creates a travel destination.

Most mid size US cities have Rep Theaters that perform plays with local talent that draw an audience from rural Dogpatch.  Large Cities like Chicago & LA often stage long running full productions with major stars. For decades a big birthday/holiday gift was enjoying a "Phantom Weekend" in Toronto, a 5 hour drive.

Any time any of the performing arts are recognized & lauded by their peers, its a plus. 

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From the last few days:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016) Liked it better than Waititi's Jojo Rabbit which I thought got old very fast, and the humor here reminded me of another NZ comedy (although a TV series), Flight of the Conchords.  I guess Waititi has worked with the Conchords on projects, so that makes sense.  Liked it.

Possessed (1947) On Noir Alley.  Didn't go in the direction I thought would go.  Liked it.

Roger and Me (1989) A film from back when I liked Moore.  We studied this film in film school and basically learned how Moore manipulated audiences to create propaganda instead of true documentaries.  The example I use from this film is cross-editing the GM holiday party with people being evicted from their houses on Christmas when the people being evicted either had never worked for GM or hadn't worked there for years and only for a short time.  Still, I enjoyed this film upon first viewing and I can't help thinking with every Moore film that features Flint, MI that that city just can't catch a break and not sure how it survives.

Some Came Running (1958) The first collaboration between Sinatra and Dino.  Maybe it was the wine I was drinking at the time, but I struggled to follow and had to read the wikipedia page before the film ended to get the plot straight.

East Side, West Side (1949)  Thought the cast was great and liked it.

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A Quiet Place Poster

A Quiet Place (2018) F/X On Demand-7/10

A family is hunted by strange creatures who are attracted by loud noises.

This is a tense little horror film, very well directed. It takes place for the most part in a beautiful, pastoral setting. It has a short running time (87 min) which is a plus since if it was any longer it would not work. The dialogue is minimal since the family's life depends on being quiet. Emily Blunt and John Krasinski (he also directed) are very good as the parents. But the outstanding one here is Millicent Simmonds as their deaf daughter. She is also deaf in real life, she has a great porcelain doll-like face and very expressive eyes. She also appeared in the 2017 Todd Haynes film Wonderstruck, which is also worth seeking out. 

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15 hours ago, Swithin said:

Some people watch award shows without having seen (or heard) any of the nominees. I don't watch the Oscars as regularly as I used to, but I watched most of the show this year, without having seen (or wanting to see) any of the movies. There are young people all over this country who dream of going to the theater, and sometimes the Tony Awards show brings them closer to that dream. And it is after all history and education as well as, one hopes, entertainment.

I remember when Koch first sold the idea that tourism would help rescue NYC.  (A city then literally synonymous with "Mugging", and you never heard one word in a sentence without the other.)

The secret to getting people from outside to change their travel destinations and say I ❤️ N Y?:  The Broadway shows that were experiencing a late-70's renaissance at the time, with Annie, A Chorus Line, and Frank Langella's Dracula.  Maybe you recall the ads at the time--

The Tonys have a lot of industry categories to hand out, and usually don't televise Best Lighting in a Play (and the tech people in the local stage community hugging each other for their team effort...it's like a big family!), but you can be sure the Best Musical excerpts get full national network coverage.

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Ventured into HBO territory and, typical for me, picked a little early 90s film instead of the biggest and newest. Said film was 1991's Mystery Date, a twisty little teen comedy with attitude, a mixture somewhere between Adventures in Babysitting and After Hours, as hard as that might be to believe. Ethan Hawke played a very shy teenager who had a crush on Teri Polo from afar but had never asked her out. His older brother sets a date up, and proceeds to make Hawke look a lot like himself. only the date doesn't go as planned as the night quickly changes its mood to being one of panic, mayhem, and plenty of intrigue. This is the type of little film that might not be saying anything deep, but its a lot of fun due to the sheer roller-coaster nature of it all, plus appealing performances from the leads on this date night that goes so terribly wrong.

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I watched East Side,  West Side last night for the 2nd time and was glad I did.    The film has a fine cast with first rate,  experienced actors like Barbara Stanwyck and Van Heflin,   new to Hollywood actor James Mason,  and fairly new actresses Ava Gardner and Cyd Charisse.      

The film is a very mature and frank portrayal of a man (Mason),   who has a mistress (Gardner) who also plays the field,  a wife that loves him as well as supports him (Stanwyck),  and a  man,  who was a former cop,   that steps into the drama (Heflin),  who falls for Stanwyck.    All in a well filmed New York setting.      The film is mostly a melodrama but it does take an interesting turn with a murder.      The film is fairly open about sexuality especially for a 1949 film. 

If you haven't seen the film I highly recommend it.  

 

East Side, West Side (1949) | The Hollywood Revue

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

A Quiet Place (2018) 

I saw A Quiet Place II last weekend in the movie theater.   The film begins with a glimpse of the day that the aliens arrive disrupting life in the idyllic small town.  The noise and chaos of the people's reaction to the invasion is a nice contrast to  the oppressive silence that follows.  The rest of the film takes place right where the first one left off.  This time the family is on the move.  Cillian Murphy is quiet good as a new character who enters the family's lives.  He and  Millicent Simmonds are thrown together and their scenes are the most compelling.  The plot is basically the same:   Defeating the aliens and surviving by keeping quiet.  Certainly watchable but not nearly as entertaining  as the first.  The ending was not a surprise and felt more like an unsatisfying to-be-continued.  The couple next to us in the theater even asked the usher if there was another scene after the credits.  

I read that A Quiet Place III is on the way in 2023.  The article said it will be "a spin-off more than a sequel."  Not quite sure what that means but it sounds like they might drag this out even longer.    It may be one of those ideas that should have stayed just one movie.   John Krasinski is handing over the writing and directing duties to Jeff Nichols for the third one.  Nichols wrote and directed 2011's Take Shelter with Michael Shannon. 

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