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23 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OH MY GOD!!! I also listen to 80s on Sirius and a couple of days ago I also heard DA BUTT (around 2:00 or 3:oo pm east coast time) I LISTENED TO IT THOUGH.  
It’s entirely possible they worked it into regular rotation, since you and I live in different time zones, but just maybe, we shared the moment across the miles... 

Lets make it “our song”!!

I'm in eastern time zone as well, only I think it was a few hours later around 5 PM on Saturday. There are plenty of wonderful 80s songs on that channel.....

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10 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Most mid size US cities have Rep Theaters that perform plays with local talent that draw an audience from rural Dogpatch.  Large Cities like Chicago & LA often stage long running full productions with major stars. For decades a big birthday/holiday gift was enjoying a "Phantom Weekend" in Toronto, a 5 hour drive.

Any time any of the performing arts are recognized & lauded by their peers, its a plus. 

Our area is saturated with community theatre, which is now starting up again. I'm working with one performing SHOUT! at the moment. The best group is a children's theatre and its company is HUGE. Seattle -nearby- gets the big shows. So, yeah some of the Dogpatch inhabitants take an interest in the award shows.

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I wasn't able to watch most of the prime time offerings Tuesday night for Cyd Charisse, but I've seen them before and I enjoyed them.

"Two Weeks In Another Town" had a nice cast, although some of the acting was over-the-top (particularly from Robinson and Trevor), but I didn't mind that as it didn't detract from the overall plot.  I always get a kick out of watching Charisse near the end of the picture showing the audience what 'scream therapy' actually looks like, as Kirk Douglas drives his Maserati down a twisting road on a hillside with reckless abandon😀!   An early scene where Douglas slaps George Macready in the airport looked real...and real hurty too!

"Party Girl" was the second movie of the evening, and I was able to catch the second half of it.  Charisse falls for a mob lawyer played by Robert Taylor who is constantly trying to protect the mob boss (Lee J. Cobb) and try to keep him out of trouble with the authorities.  Again, a good cast all the way around, with a cool climactic scene.  Some people can only take guys like Cobb and Rod Steiger in small doses, as they say they overact to the hilt.  It's funny, but I don't seem to mind it when Cobb and Steiger do it, but it bugs me to see James Dean do it!  I don't mind Robert Taylor so much, but in many of his roles, he had this look about him where he seemed likely to beat the crap out of somebody at the drop of a hat...just because he felt like it!   For an MGM flick, this one had some ruthless violence in it that Louis Mayer would never have approved, but it was made well after he had departed the studio lot.

"East Side, West Side" is another film I've seen before, and once again, Charisse co-stars with a pretty strong lineup of talent.  The only rub I'd have against this one was how easy the cops let Van Heflin's character ( a former cop) immerse himself in a crime scene, just days after he returned from a stint in Italy as an employee of the State Department.   Several days ago, there were a couple of posters who intimated that Ava Gardner may have been attractive to look at on screen, but they didn't think she was a very good actress.   I disagree.  I think she's quite underrated; sort of like how some see Robert Mitchum or Jane Russell.

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1 hour ago, midwestan said:

"East Side, West Side" is another film I've seen before, and once again, Charisse co-stars with a pretty strong lineup of talent.  The only rub I'd have against this one was how easy the cops let Van Heflin's character ( a former cop) immerse himself in a crime scene, just days after he returned from a stint in Italy as an employee of the State Department.   Several days ago, there were a couple of posters who intimated that Ava Gardner may have been attractive to look at on screen, but they didn't think she was a very good actress.   I disagree.  I think she's quite underrated; sort of like how some see Robert Mitchum or Jane Russell.

Yea,  the lead cop (a young William Conrad in fine form),  and how he let Heflin's character take over the case wasn't very realistic but hey,  it's Hollywood!  

I have always felt Ava Gardner was a good actress.    Not in the league of Stanwyck (few are),  but convincing in the roles I've seen her in.    

As for Mitchum;   I can't recall anyone at this forum ever saying they felt Mitchum wasn't a fine actor.    I think he was one of the best. 

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41 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  the lead cop (a young William Conrad in fine form),  and how he let Heflin's character take over the case wasn't very realistic but hey,  it's Hollywood!  

I have always felt Ava Gardner was a good actress.    Not in the league of Stanwyck (few are),  but convincing in the roles I've seen her in.    

As for Mitchum;   I can't recall anyone at this forum ever saying they felt Mitchum wasn't a fine actor.    I think he was one of the best. 

I still find it hard to believe that someone as good as Barbara Stanwyck (and Deborah Kerr, for that matter) never won a competitive Oscar as Best Actress.  On top of that, Mitchum's only nomination came very early in his career in "The Story of G.I. Joe".  Gardner's only nomination came for "Mogambo", when I thought she should have at least been nominated for her performances in "The Barefoot Contessa" or "Bhowani Junction", which I consider better performances from her.

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Regarding the Tony Awards, they used to televise the "technical" awards, then relegated them to that first hour on local television. Later, they just showed clips of those winners in a montage on the main show.

Btw, tourists are already returning to New York, even without theater.

https://nypost.com/2021/03/19/tourists-coming-back-to-business-starved-nyc/

lil-abner-1959-film-80d06aed-6806-4738-8

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RE: DOG PATCH and MUSICAL THEATER

I feel compelled to note that the 1959 film musical of LIL ABNER is (as I recall it) FUNNY AS HELL and more than a little subversive (it's a little like SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS meets DR STRANGELOVE)

Just treat JERRY LEWIS's cameo as an ENTRE'ACTE and go use the can or something.

TCM, PLEASE SHOW THIS ONE AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

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17 hours ago, Peebs said:

I read that A Quiet Place III is on the way in 2023.  The article said it will be "a spin-off more than a sequel."  Not quite sure what that means but it sounds like they might drag this out even longer.    It may be one of those ideas that should have stayed just one movie.   John Krasinski is handing over the writing and directing duties to Jeff Nichols for the third one.  Nichols wrote and directed 2011's Take Shelter with Michael Shannon. 

That does not sound promising. It seems like today when they get a fairly original, well done new idea, they ruin it with sequels and prequels. They twist it, turn it on it's head and wring it out like a wet wash cloth and just run into the ground.

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14 hours ago, midwestan said:

I still find it hard to believe that someone as good as Barbara Stanwyck (and Deborah Kerr, for that matter) never won a competitive Oscar as Best Actress.  On top of that, Mitchum's only nomination came very early in his career in "The Story of G.I. Joe".  Gardner's only nomination came for "Mogambo", when I thought she should have at least been nominated for her performances in "The Barefoot Contessa" or "Bhowani Junction", which I consider better performances from her.

The Academy Awards are just a marketing event manufactured by the studios  to promote their products.      During the studio-era were most actors and directors were under contract with a specific studio,  the awards were not intended to reflect who was the best,  but instead who to promote so the studio could make more money off the actors \ directors they had under contract.

Actors like Stanwyck were largely independent,  signing short term contracts (e.g. 3 picture deals),  instead of  7 year contracts.     Same goes for Cary Grant and some others.   Mitchum was under contract for RKO early in his career but after that made films with multiple studios.      For me that is the primary reason for their lack of nominations.

 

 

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How to Steal a Million (1966)

 

A beautiful but slightly klutzy young lady enlists a tall, slim, brutal, mean, terrible man with deep blue eyes to help her steal a statue which belongs to her so that she will not have to go to America.

I consider it one of the great shames of classic Hollywood that Audrey Hepburn and Peter O'Toole appeared together only this once because they have great chemistry and are a truly beautiful couple. That Hugh Griffith is her father does make one wonder about genetics.  Fernand Gravey as the director of the museum and Jacques Marin as the head guard of said museum were excellently cast. Moustache as a guard is quite fun. Charles Boyer has a minor role necessary for story purposes and he fills it professionally with no opportunity to become a grandiose caricature. Eli Wallach seems a bit of typecasting as he is supposed to be somewhat irritating. 

This is William Wyler at his height and John Williams provided a lively score.

Even the automobiles in this movie are perfect! She drives a sassy little Autobianchi Bianchina Cabriolet while he has a stereotypical but quite lovely Jaguar E-Type 4.2.

9.9/10

I am sorry to say that I could find no streaming service which carries it free. We have the DVD but I purchased it on: Amazon Prime Video because we had earned video credits which were soon to expire and we had no other use for them.  

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8 minutes ago, SansFin said:

How to Steal a Million (1966)

 

A beautiful but slightly klutzy young lady enlists a tall, slim, brutal, mean, terrible man with deep blue eyes to help her steal a statue which belongs to her so that she will not have to go to America.

I consider it one of the great shames of classic Hollywood that Audrey Hepburn and Peter O'Toole appeared together only this once because they have great chemistry and are a truly beautiful couple. That Hugh Griffith is her father does make one wonder about genetics.  Fernand Gravey as the director of the museum and Jacques Marin as the head guard of said museum were excellently cast. Moustache as a guard is quite fun. Charles Boyer has a minor role necessary for story purposes and he fills it professionally with no opportunity to become a grandiose caricature. Eli Wallach seems a bit of typecasting as he is supposed to be somewhat irritating. 

This is William Wyler at his height and John Williams provided a lively score.

Even the automobiles in this movie are perfect! She drives a sassy little Autobianchi Bianchina Cabriolet while he has a stereotypical but quite lovely Jaguar E-Type 4.2.

9.9/10

I am sorry to say that I could find no streaming service which carries it free. We have the DVD but I purchased it on: Amazon Prime Video because we had earned video credits which were soon to expire and we had no other use for them.  

A very timely review! - How to Steal a Million is scheduled to be shown on TCM this coming Sunday evening, June 13 at 8 pm ET.

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Two comments:  Re: A Quiet Place was filmed around where I live, so people in the Buffalo area were slightly upset that it got knocked out of 1st place in box office receipts last week.  Also, it is very interesting and kudos to John K. for casting someone who is deaf in real life.

Re: How to Steal a Million - has been run numerous times on one of my FX? stations.  However, I would like to see the intro to it (some of the stations that show movies are taking a cue from TCM and re-examining films for racism, etc.).  Audrey pairs well with all her costars (O'Toole too).  Spoiler alert - there is a scene where O'Toole makes fun of Hepburn's characters penchant for Givenchy (who famously clothed her in Sabrina - and yes, I like the movie in spite of the age difference between her and Bogie).

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19 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The Academy Awards are just a marketing event manufactured by the studios  to promote their products.      During the studio-era were most actors and directors were under contract with a specific studio,  the awards were not intended to reflect who was the best,  but instead who to promote so the studio could make more money off the actors \ directors they had under contract.

Actors like Stanwyck were largely independent,  signing short term contracts (e.g. 3 picture deals),  instead of  7 year contracts.     Same goes for Cary Grant and some others.   Mitchum was under contract for RKO early in his career but after that made films with multiple studios.      For me that is the primary reason for their lack of nominations.

 

 

Also for consideration is that for a very long time, nominations in the acting categories was limited to just 5 people.  The Academy has increased that recently, which was a smart move on its part.  I think 10 nominations is too many, but 7 or 8 nominees would be more appropriate.

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On 6/8/2021 at 6:04 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I know I posted this in my Oscar thread, but it never gets old:

 

PLEASE! Enough already!

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10 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

A very timely review! - How to Steal a Million is scheduled to be shown on TCM this coming Sunday evening, June 13 at 8 pm ET.

Thanks for the reminder! Haven't seen this film in ages! It takes awhile to get going, but once it does is a clever heist caper.

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

https://www.tcm.com/video/1328035/ben-mankiewicz-intro-how-to-steal-a-million-1966

I do not know if that intro is for the next scheduled airing or if it was for when the movie aired in: 2017.

That's from the previous TCM broadcast on Monday, June 19, 2017, when Audrey Hepburn was Star of the Month.  (Didn't realize it has been that long since TCM aired the film.)  Ben's intro probably won't be a whole lot different this time, but the theme Sunday is "Museum Capers," and the film is paired with Topkapi (1964).

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three from yesterday:

Paris Blues (1961) A romanticized view of the jazz scene in early 60's Paris.  I liked the film but felt like it was kind of an unfinished story and there were some  plots that never really went anywhere.  There's obviously a subtext of race relations in the US juxtaposed to France but it didn't feel genuine to me and more like it was forced in, and then it never really went anywhere.  Poitier decides to move back to the US for a woman even though he loves living in Paris and his career is in Paris.  I didn't see it as him taking a stand and choosing to fight back against the unseen but referenced racism in the US, but instead i just thought the woman was selfish to expect him to drop everything in his life to move for her.  There's obviously something that was left unexplored regarding mixed race couples as well.  Clearly Newman's character was hitting on the black Diahann Carroll but ended up with the white Joanne Woodward after she pursued him relentlessly after he showed no interest in her repeatedly.  But that never went anywhere.  There was a clear set-up for something that was missed.  Loved the scenes with Louis Armstrong.  Great cast, Sidney Poitier is becoming one of my favorites after watching so many films of his in the last year for the first time that I've loved.

Crisis (1963) Finally watched this classic documentary.  I mistakenly always assumed the crisis in the film surrounded either the bay of pigs invasion or the cuban missile crisis.  great film and an important one to see.

The War Room (1993) Another one i had been meaning to watch for a long time.  while it is universally praised, i didn't really think it was good.  the tagline says 'they changed the way campaigns were won' but i didn't really see how.  I think the film has actually aged really badly for Bill Clinton as it starts with the accusations against him by Gennifer Flowers and she is literally laughed relentlessly and never taken serious.  i expected more for this doc and obviously its a fascinating film for what it shows, other than that initial fascination, i got nothing else from it that i found worthwhile.  According to the wikipedia page there was only 36 hours of footage that was recorded across 4 months.  That is a ridiculously low amount of footage.

Anyway 2 out of 3 ain't bad.

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1 minute ago, Shank Asu said:

Paris Blues (1961) A romanticized view of the jazz scene in early 60's Paris.  I liked the film but felt like it was kind of an unfinished story and there were some  plots that never really went anywhere.  There's obviously a subtext of race relations in the US juxtaposed to France but it didn't feel genuine to me and more like it was forced in, and then it never really went anywhere.  Poitier decides to move back to the US for a woman even though he loves living in Paris and his career is in Paris.  I didn't see it as him taking a stand and choosing to fight back against the unseen but referenced racism in the US, but instead i just thought the woman was selfish to expect him to drop everything in his life to move for her.  There's obviously something that was left unexplored regarding mixed race couples as well.  Clearly Newman's character was hitting on the black Diahann Carroll but ended up with the white Joanne Woodward after she pursued him relentlessly after he showed no interest in her repeatedly.  But that never went anywhere.  There was a clear set-up for something that was missed.  Loved the scenes with Louis Armstrong.  Great cast, Sidney Poitier is becoming one of my favorites after watching so many films of his in the last year for the first time that I've loved.

Well said.    While I'm a big fan of Paris Blues because I'm a want-a-be jazz musician,   as noted there were some missed opportunities here.   E.g.  Many New York\East Coast based jazz musicians moved to Europe due to how they were treated in the USA.    One of my favorites tenor sax player Dexter Gordon did so.    I wished they worked in a scene where Carroll meet some of these musicians so that it didn't look like it was only the Poitier character that felt a lot more at "home" (welcomed) in Paris than he did in the USA.   

The jazz guitarist Jimmy Raney visited Paris in the late 50s and was very successful.    The film also reminds me of his experiences there with French jazz musicians.

 

 

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12 hours ago, midwestan said:

Also for consideration is that for a very long time, nominations in the acting categories was limited to just 5 people.  The Academy has increased that recently, which was a smart move on its part.  I think 10 nominations is too many, but 7 or 8 nominees would be more appropriate.

 

The acting awards are still limited to five people.

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Wolf Song (1929)

Rare silent western, set in 1840 New Mexico, noteworthy as the film that first introduced Gary Cooper to "Mexican Spitfire" Lupe Velez, initiating a torrid two year affair between the two actors. Director Victor Fleming would soon follow up on this drama with a second western with Cooper, The Virginian, which would make the actor a star.

The Wolf Song (1929) - IMDb

Cooper plays fur trapper Sam Lash in this earlier film, who combines forces with two grizzled fur trappers (Louis Wolheim and Constantine Romanoff) to travel the Rocky Mountain area together, until Coop encounters senorita Velez in a small town. They fall head over heels for one another but Velez's father swears to kill Coop if he comes near his daughter again. Father or no father, Cooper soon talks her into eloping with him (much to the consternation of his two fur trapper pals). After a while, though, the wolf song of the mountains starts to call to a restless Cooper, and Velez becomes concerned that she is going to lose him.

There's not much more to the simple story than that, and it's the weakness of the plot that remains the film's main flaw, including a somewhat maudlin ending. On the positive side, though, director Fleming brings atmosphere to the production with some genuinely impressive scenic mountainous backdrops as the fur trappers ride their horses through the wilderness. There will also be a couple of surprisingly wild brawls for Wolheim, the first with Romanoff in a bar and a later one with Cooper in the wild (a fight that a fiery Velez will break up).

Cooper, at age 27, was arguably at the peak of his male beauty and it's easy to see why he would be considered a heart throb to many females in the audience. Movie buffs, who may primarily recall the actor from his later High Noon period in which his features were more tired and haggard, may be surprised by how attractive he was as a young man. There is even a skinny dipping scene featuring what may have been a largely naked Cooper in it (he is photographed from the back from the hips up).

Silent Volume: The Wolf Song (1929)

Historically, too, it's interesting seeing Cooper and Velez falling for one another in this film with the knowledge that it was actually happening to the two stars off the set, as well. It would be a highly passionate affair of personality opposites (she was all fire while he was naturally laid back and reserved).

Wolf Song was originally released as a part talkie, which included scenes with singer Russ Columbo. The talkie sequences, along with Columbo, are considered lost and this silent version, running a few minutes past an hour, are what now survive. There is a rough but watchable copy of this film now on rarefilmm.com. There is no audio currently attached to this version but since the original Vitaphone soundtrack of the film exists on You Tube it may well be a matter of time before the video and audio are married together on the website. Admittedly, though, that soundtrack (which includes Velez singing a couple of songs) is in very rough condition.

The Wolf Song (1929)

2.5 out of 4

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The Doors (1991) -- 1/10

Oliver Stone was considered to be one of America's formost movie directors for about a decade starting in 1986. Between 1986 and 1995, he directed ten films, six of which were up for major Oscars, and half were controversial hits at the box office. Speaking personally, 4 of those films were truly good: Heaven and Earth, Talk Radio, JFK, and Nixon. Many of the others, like Salvador, Platoon, Wall Street, and Born on the Fourth of July were strong in parts, but weak in others. But nothing really prepared me, in spite of not being his biggest fan, for the absolute calamity of The Doors.
Released in early 1991, although one gets the sneaking suspicion that this was failed Oscar bait of 1990 that got delayed after bad test previews, The Doors concentrates on the story of Jim Morrison,  the troubled main singer of the titular band who was found dead in a bathtub in a Paris apartment in 1971, not yet even 28 years of age. Val Kilmer plays Morrison, and is pretty much a dead ringer for him in voice and look, but one ends up wondering long before the end why this film was even made. The Doors were a popular band among youth and the hippies at the time and Oliver Stone pitched a movie idea to the real Morrison in 1970. But, by the time of its release, Morrison was dead for 20 years, his wife for 17 years, and the age of Aquarius had long since ended. And what was left was a shallow, empty shell of a film that seems clueless  to how to approach the man its about, and shows us endless excess of drugs, sex, and vapid behavior instead. Its like a child playing one single note on a keyboard for 140 minutes: monotonous, irritating, offensive, and mind numbing.

Kilmer is truly dressed up with nowhere to go; he embodies the man, but the more we see of the man he plays, the more unbelievable and unbearable the idea of watching  140 minute film about him  is. The Jim of the film is self-absorbed beyond relief, self-destructive, reckless, horrible to everyone around him, excessive in every vice, and vapid to the point of rarely having any idea in his little brain under his hippie-glam surface. If the real Morrison was completely like this, one wonders why people would even want to be around him, if he wasn't so far gone, the film really feels like an insult. The film feels like it was photographed and written by the character as well, it often looks woozy , precarious, and spaced-out inspite of its rich colors, and many of its written scenes feel disoriented, dazed, and clueless. The writers seemingly have no grasp on Morrison's inner life; he remains an enigma to both them and to us.  Watching scenes like a wild, unhinged Miami concert or Jim getting sex from a groupie in an elevator that his wife ultimately witnesses feel like being flung into the outer circles of hell. Hiroshimus Bosch and Dante would be so pleased. Essentially, Kilmer is the film, because the rest of the cast, even the wife, the lover, and the bandmates, feel like gorified cameo players much of the time.
Regarding those little used supporting players, Meg Ryan's performance as the wife is schizophrenic; at times she feels a lot like the 60s party girl he is playing, at other times she feels like a hippie version of June Cleaver; even so, she has some moments and injects some emotion into the bits given to her. Kathleen Quinlan as the lover even out-weirds Kilmer with her big scene talking about the history of witches and asking whether Morrison has ever had blood to drink; even her performance is schizoid, as her last, unresolved scene tearfully shows her in a more conventional light. Talented individuals like Paul Williams, Mimi Rogers, Michael Wincott, Billy Idol, and Crispin Glover (as Andy Warhol) make token appearances. The bandmates, Kyle MacLachlin, Frank Whalley, and Kevin Dillon, are all so very sidelined, you see reaction shots a lot from them, but MacLachlin gets most of the few lines they are handed. Perhaps its because I'd seen a lot of him this year via binging Desperate Housewives and Twin Peaks on Hulu or that he was the lead in one of the best films I have ever seen, Blue Velvet, maybe because Kilmer's character was unbearable, but I focused  on MacLachlin whenever he was onscreen. Even with  terrible wigs that made him look like Jeffrey Dahmer (the whole film is a frightful wig extravaganza for almost everyone involved) and minimal lines and screentime, MacLachlin gives the  most satisfying performance in the film; he quietly radiates down-to-earth normalcy and self-effacing tendencies, a welcome tonic from the wretched excess surrounding him.
Perhaps I would not have been so hard on The Doors if I hadn't been reminded of the sheer amount of honest, tender, heartbreaking soulfulness and depth that Bette Midler and Frederic Forrest had in a similar self-destructive singer film The Rose (inspired by Janis Joplin) or if I hadn't just experienced another, significantly better evils of drug addiction film, the superior 1991 film Rush, with its heartrending and utterly convincing performance from Jennifer Jason Leigh and deep wells of the insight and emotion that this film is completely lacking in. Or if I even liked the music of the band, much of which was definitely not my cup of tea. But a person approaches film armed with everything seen up to that point, and I had seen the cinematic gold before seeing this piece of coal. 1991 was actually an extremely strong year for films, with very few flat-out misfires. In the past I had labled either Martin Scorsese's Cape Fear or Blake Edwards' Switch as the worst films of that otherwise extraordinary year of the 75+ films I had seen. But its pretty clear to me now that Oliver Stone 's The Doors is actually the worst film of 1991, ironic because he also directed one of the best of the year, JFK, as well. Aside from MacLachlin and some Meg Ryan moments, the  only joy I got from The Doors was reading Paul Rudnick slam the film and its pretensions under his Libby Gelman-Waxner pseudonym in an outrageously funny magazine column. To close borrowing one of his trademarks, you can't get much better after viewing an ordeal of a film, "if you ask me".

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2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

The Doors (1991) -- 1/10

Kilmer is truly dressed up with nowhere to go; he embodies the man, but the more we see of the man he plays, the more unbelievable and unbearable the idea of watching  140 minute film about him  is. The Jim of the film is self-absorbed beyond relief, self-destructive, reckless, horrible to everyone around him, excessive in every vice, and vapid to the point of rarely having any idea in his little brain under his hippie-glam surface. If the real Morrison was completely like this, one wonders why people would even want to be around him, if he wasn't so far gone, the film really feels like an insult. 

From what I've seen of vintage Morrison, it doesn't sound off the mark.  Jim was famous for his rampaging ego, otherwise he wouldn't have gotten a movie.

Once he was off of the conspiracy theories, Oliver Stone's fumigated taste for paranoia turned to "alternate" biographies of other individuals who were totally misunderstood by the media, dood...And just like he came up with alternate theories for the JFK investigation, Stone's biopics also come up with alternate--if not accurate, but teasing guesses--theories for how history misunderstood some "self-indulgent" moment or statement.  Here, the Dancing Indian keeps fueling Morrison's quest to keep self-destructively pushing envelopes, and we get a reasonably plausible reason why Morrison was arrested at the concert for insulting the police.

If you're not sure what I'm talking about, try watching it back to back with the Anthony Hopkins Nixon (1995), where Stone tried to come up with plausible (if only they were true) alternate theories for the missing 18 minutes on the tape, or "You won't have Nixon to kick around anymore".  Stone was also producer on the Klaus Von Bulow-defense Reversal of Fortune (1990), and it's possible he may have had that originally lined up for himself to direct--Klaus was totally being tried by the big-media, they just had it all wrong...

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