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2 hours ago, Curtis DeHaven said:

I know the thread is named I Just Watched, but how about something I didn’t watch?  Sunrise at Campobello (1960).  While surfing the channels last night, I parked on TCM’s airing of this one for a bit in the middle.  It’s apparently about the early years of FDR and Eleanor as he faces polio.  I’ve really only ever known of Ralph Bellamy as Bruce Baldwin in His Girl Friday (1940), though for some reason he has popped up for me a couple of times lately.  But, as FDR, I think he does a really good job.  Something about his voice…  And Greer Garson got an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of Eleanor.  Looked really good.  With a runtime of almost two and half hours, which I’m not a fan of, I’ll still put this one on my watch list.  Love to hear something from anyone familiar with the film…

Greer Garson departed from her mainly "lovely" look in such movies as Goodbye Mr. Chips, Random Harvest, Mrs. Miniver, etc. to get closer to the look of Eleanor Roosevelt. I liked both Bellamy and Garson in this.

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I enjoy watching Bellamy and Garson in Campobello also.

Interesting that the role of Eleanor was considered Featured/Supporting for Tony Award purposes. 

Not having read or seen the play I'm not sure if the role was expanded for the film.  Anyone have insight?

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I agree with you Tiki.  But it is how you fill those hours.  I love My Fair Lady; however, some of it could have been cut (like allowing "I'm Getting Married in the Morning" to run ad nauseum).  Martin S. needs a good editor - with the way films are offered now (and even before the pandemic and all these streaming services), many director, etc. forgot that people can only sit for so long before they get fidgety or need to use the facilities.  Sunrise and C. is well worth it, as is GWTW.  The same is true today of TV Shows - I don't need two-hour plus or two-part or longer finales.  Ralph B. was a versatile actor.  He does a great turn in His Girl Friday opposite Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell!  I've seen the movie; however, I already knew a lot of Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor.  She gets mocked today for being rather unattractive - but she was one of the finest 1st ladies of the 20th century.  Also, I believe the media had an agreement about photographing Roosevelt in a wheelchair.  Not happy about his turning away the St. Louis, but I know of someone who actually got off the boat.

Now, has there ever been a movie made about Harry Truman?

 

As for what I just watched - right now I'm watching my computer and what is going outside my window.  Before that, it was the Today Show and some local news.  Nick Wallenda just walked the tightrope again; this made it on the tonight show - Amazon boxes with masks being delivered to a home circa where I live.  Goodbye Mr. Chips is fairly long, but worth every moment of it.  Great performance by Robert Donat.  Another movie he is in (his last - and the role he played wouldn't be considered politically correct today) is Inn of Sixth Happiness (based on a true story and starring the great Ingrid Bergman).

 

 

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

 

Now, has there ever been a movie made about Harry Truman?

There was an HBO Movie made several years ago starring GARY SINISE and DIANA SCARWID (as Bess,) i saw the ending, which was pretty memorable...I know GARY SINISE ended up kinda drifting after bursting onto the scene with FORREST GUMP, but he did a pretty good job in the scenes I saw (I recall there being an outburst because DWIGHT EISENHOWER (the incoming President) refused to sit down to tea with him and his wife.

 

EDIT- dang it came out in 1995! didnt know it was that old!

 

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The Undertaker and His Pals (Watch TCM)

The title characters kill and dismember big-breasted women to drum up business for the undertaker, and the pals use the body parts as “specials” in their greasy spoon. Scenes vary from washed out to saturated color. Robert Lowery has a cameo, everyone else is unknown and deservedly so. The ending made no sense. However, I did enjoy looking at the chicks.

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17 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

The Undertaker and His Pals (Watch TCM)

The title characters kill and dismember big-breasted women to drum up business for the undertaker, and the pals use the body parts as “specials” in their greasy spoon. Scenes vary from washed out to saturated color. Robert Lowery has a cameo, everyone else is unknown and deservedly so. The ending made no sense. However, I did enjoy looking at the chicks.

I tried watching this when it first ran on TCM a few months ago. I could not make it past about 20 minutes, and I’ve seen some terrible terrible TERRIBLE movies.

In other words, congratulations.

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34 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I tried watching this when it first ran on TCM a few months ago. I could not make it past about 20 minutes, and I’ve seen some terrible terrible TERRIBLE movies.

In other words, congratulations.

I had an hour to kill

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On 6/16/2021 at 1:16 PM, EricJ said:

The 70's were the golden age of TV Themes.  

Oh, wait, TV actually HAD opening themes back then, before "Law & Order"'s attempt to be "cinematic" played up to network's fear of short audience attention spans.

There were quite a few good TV themes in the 80s as well, but by the mid 90s it was clear that TV was trying to purge themselves of them. 

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A few years ago one of the cable channels, don't remember which one, starting running Mad Men every

day. I kept watching, catching the few I hadn't seen the first time around and the ones I hadn't seen for

several years. I have to admit most of the characters are unlikable, but I still enjoy the show. One of my

favorite moments was when Sally's friend, I think his name was Glen, admitted that he had signed up

to go to Vietnam, and Sally says You ******* idiot, right in front of Betty. Hilarious. The counter culture

doesn't show up for a while, but there were a few stereotypical hippies around, though not that many.

And I doubt that Pat Boone outsold the Beatles or the Rolling Stones. :)

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14 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

i've recently been thinking i need to re-watch the series and introduce it to my wife. i always liked that it wasn't about the counter culture (at least in the first 2/3 of the series. the counter culture is always what seems to get the attention but Pat Boone sold more records than any of the famous rock bands from the era.

 

8 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

. The counter culture

doesn't show up for a while, but there were a few stereotypical hippies around, though not that many.

And I doubt that Pat Boone outsold the Beatles or the Rolling Stones. :)

Right.  Shank Asu,  where on earth did you get the idea that Pat Boone was more popular than "any of the famous rock bands from the era"  ?  I really find that hard to believe.   Did you,  maybe just make that up because it's your perception?  Or you like the idea that Pat Boone was more successful in terms of record selling?  What's that statement based on?   I have to agree with Vautrin,  I really doubt Pat Boone ever sold more records than any of the major rock bands from the '60s.

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7 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

Right.  Shank Asu,  where on earth did you get the idea that Pat Boone was more popular than "any of the famous rock bands from the era"  ?  I really find that hard to believe.   Did you,  maybe just make that up because it's your perception?  Or you like the idea that Pat Boone was more successful in terms of record selling?  What's that statement based on?   I have to agree with Vautrin,  I really doubt Pat Boone ever sold more records than any of the major rock bands from the '60s.

In terms of raw sales, Boone was second only to Presley in the late 50s and early 60s.  Early Pat Boone recorded a lot of R&B covers, broadening the audience.   And even though Elvis eclipsed him in popularity eventually, Elvis at one time was Boone's opening act.  So by that measure, he was pretty successful for a while.

Boone held a record, however well into the 21st century.  He had one or more hits on the charts for a consecutive 220 weeks (over 4 years).

All of that pretty much ended when rock/pop veered in another direction with the arrival of The Beatles.

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

A few years ago one of the cable channels, don't remember which one, starting running Mad Men every

day. I kept watching, catching the few I hadn't seen the first time around and the ones I hadn't seen for

several years. I have to admit most of the characters are unlikable, but I still enjoy the show. One of my

favorite moments was when Sally's friend, I think his name was Glen, admitted that he had signed up

to go to Vietnam, and Sally says You ******* idiot, right in front of Betty. Hilarious. The counter culture

doesn't show up for a while, but there were a few stereotypical hippies around, though not that many.

And I doubt that Pat Boone outsold the Beatles or the Rolling Stones. :)

Actually he flunked out of college so he was on his way anyway.  Mad Men is currently being carried on IMDb via Amazon Prime.  We just finished watching it again.  Last saw it when it was on AMC.  Ironically this time around I really saw how low some of the characters actually were, especially Don Drapper.  Roger Sterling's daughter abandoned her husband and child and moved to a hippie commune in PA (I think).  Don Drapper's girlfriend from the earliest episodes later turns up as a hippie/dope addict.

As for Boone, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, Boone ranks right behind the Stones.  Considering the differences in record sales in 50's and 60's  of Boone's era and the later one of The Beatles and the Stones, who really knows.  Boone was also successful in TV and movies, not to mention selling stuff on TV.   Is he still selling walk-in tubs?  Ironically I never cared for any of them - and still don't. 

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I'm a huge Mad Men fan.  This line from Bert Cooper is one of the best I've ever heard on television:

"She was born in 1898 in a barn. She died on the thirty-seventh floor of a skyscraper. She’s an astronaut."

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

  I really doubt Pat Boone ever sold more records than any of the major rock bands from the '60s.

But he has sold more Relief Factor than any of those guys.

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21 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

I'm a huge Mad Men fan.  This line from Bert Cooper is one of the best I've ever heard on television:

"She was born in 1898 in a barn. She died on the thirty-seventh floor of a skyscraper. She’s an astronaut."

I liked a encounter Don Draper had with a beatnik in a coffee house in Season 1.

Beatnik: "You work for Madison Avenue? How do you sleep at night?"

Don: "On a bed full of money!"

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2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

In terms of raw sales, Boone was second only to Presley in the late 50s and early 60s.  Early Pat Boone recorded a lot of R&B covers, broadening the audience.   And even though Elvis eclipsed him in popularity eventually, Elvis at one time was Boone's opening act.  So by that measure, he was pretty successful for a while.

Boone held a record, however well into the 21st century.  He had one or more hits on the charts for a consecutive 220 weeks (over 4 years).

All of that pretty much ended when rock/pop veered in another direction with the arrival of The Beatles.

Ok,  but the era Mad Men covers is mostly the '60s, the entire decade.  Pat Boone may have been one of the top bestsellers in the early '60s,  but by the time the Beatles and the British Invasion came along, not to mention all the great American R and B, soul, and Motown,  I seriously doubt Mr. Boone could keep up with any of them.

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1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

Ok,  but the era Mad Men covers is mostly the '60s, the entire decade.  Pat Boone may have been one of the top bestsellers in the early '60s,  but by the time the Beatles and the British Invasion came along, not to mention all the great American R and B, soul, and Motown,  I seriously doubt Mr. Boone could keep up with any of them.

I know.  That's why I said that pretty much ended with the arrival of the Beatles...

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1 hour ago, ElCid said:

 

As for Boone, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, Boone ranks right behind the Stones.  Considering the differences in record sales in 50's and 60's  of Boone's era and the later one of The Beatles and the Stones, who really knows.  Boone was also successful in TV and movies, not to mention selling stuff on TV.   Is he still selling walk-in tubs?  Ironically I never cared for any of them - and still don't. 

Never cared for any of what?  The hits of the Beatles and the Stones,  or those of Pat Boone ?   Or  maybe the walk-in tubs ?

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50 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

But he has sold more Relief Factor than any of those guys.

I actually didn't know what "Relief Factor" was and had to look it up.  At first I thought it was a laxative.

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13 hours ago, Roy Cronin said:

I enjoy watching Bellamy and Garson in Campobello also.

Interesting that the role of Eleanor was considered Featured/Supporting for Tony Award purposes. 

Not having read or seen the play I'm not sure if the role was expanded for the film.  Anyone have insight?

Roy, IIRC if your name wasn't above the title, you were considered "Featured" for purposes of the Tony, no matter the length of the part.

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12 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

 I already knew a lot of Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor.  She gets mocked today for being rather unattractive - but she was one of the finest 1st ladies of the 20th century.  Also, I believe the media had an agreement about photographing Roosevelt in a wheelchair.  Not happy about his turning away the St. Louis, but I know of someone who actually got off the boat.

As for what I just watched - right now I'm watching my computer and what is going outside my window.  Before that, it was the Today Show and some local news.  Nick Wallenda just walked the tightrope again; this made it on the tonight show - Amazon boxes with masks being delivered to a home circa where I live.  Goodbye Mr. Chips is fairly long, but worth every moment of it.  Great performance by Robert Donat.  Another movie he is in (his last - and the role he played wouldn't be considered politically correct today) is Inn of Sixth Happiness (based on a true story and starring the great Ingrid Bergman).

Have you seen the Ken Burns series about the Roosevelts? I think it's his finest, even better than the Civil War. It's about Teddy, FDR, and Eleanor, giving each a lot of time. It's fascinating and shows Eleanor for the extraordinary woman that she was. 

Regarding Robert Donat, although he wouldn't be cast today, he was superb in The Inn of the Sixth Happiness. His last line to Ingrid Bergman in the film  is sadly prescient: "We shall not see each other again, I think. Farewell." Donat had been ill during filming, and died shortly after.

 

 

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6 hours ago, ElCid said:

Actually he flunked out of college so he was on his way anyway.  Mad Men is currently being carried on IMDb via Amazon Prime.  We just finished watching it again.  Last saw it when it was on AMC.  Ironically this time around I really saw how low some of the characters actually were, especially Don Drapper.  Roger Sterling's daughter abandoned her husband and child and moved to a hippie commune in PA (I think).  Don Drapper's girlfriend from the earliest episodes later turns up as a hippie/dope addict.

As for Boone, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, Boone ranks right behind the Stones.  Considering the differences in record sales in 50's and 60's  of Boone's era and the later one of The Beatles and the Stones, who really knows.  Boone was also successful in TV and movies, not to mention selling stuff on TV.   Is he still selling walk-in tubs?  Ironically I never cared for any of them - and still don't. 

I don't recall all the details, only that he was going to Nam and Sally's outburst at that fact. From what I

recall of his character, not what I expected, unless he was drafted. Didn't Don use his connections to get

the son of the doctor whose wife he was screwing out of going? Despite his charm and wit Draper really 

was a pretty sleazy guy. Roger was almost as bad, but for some reason to me he was more likable than Don.

I am a big Beatles' fan and like the Stones too. Pat Boone was at his prime before I started listening to the

radio. I don't know if he was that close in sales to the Rolling Stones. They had a much longer hit making 

career than he did. The last thing I recall Pat hawking were those TV ear phones for oldsters. And now

comes the sad news that Jerry Mathers has leg and foot pain. Thankfully Jerry knows about a little machine

that can help him and he is only too happy to tell everyone about it.

 

 

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5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I actually didn't know what "Relief Factor" was and had to look it up.  At first I thought it was a laxative.

That's what it sounded like. Keep your white bucks white.

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8 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

Right.  Shank Asu,  where on earth did you get the idea that Pat Boone was more popular than "any of the famous rock bands from the era"  ?  I really find that hard to believe.   Did you,  maybe just make that up because it's your perception?  Or you like the idea that Pat Boone was more successful in terms of record selling?  What's that statement based on?   I have to agree with Vautrin,  I really doubt Pat Boone ever sold more records than any of the major rock bands from the '60s.

Not sure why you're taking it personally- just facts. easy to find.

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