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I took a look at Pat's discography and the big hits ended a few years before the Beatles showed up.

His prime was in the mid and late 1950s. By the early 1960s  they had pretty much dried up. It's

a bit hard to rank artists this way because usually the singles and albums are added together.

Led Zeppelin mostly came after Mad Men and they have sold a lot of "product," but that's mostly

all in albums. They never sold many 45s, at least in the U.S. Out of morbid curiosity I bought Pat's

heavy metal cover album. More comical than anything else. Too bad there was not another album

that turned the tables, like Metallica covering Love Letters in the Sand(man).

 

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1 hour ago, Shank Asu said:

Not sure why you're taking it personally- just facts. easy to find.

I'm not taking it personally.  I don't think I sounded like I was,  I was simply surprised at the claim that Pat Boone sold more records than a band such as the Beatles.

I did in fact look it up, and if the info one acquires by google is reliable  ( and agreed,  it isn't always), Pat Boone sold 45 million records, the Beatles, 600 million.

I mean,  I don't really care,  this is not intended to turn into some fruitless argument about Pat Boone versus the Beatles.  I was just saying I do not believe Boone was the higher-selling artist, and the "facts, easy to find", appear to bear me out on this.

edit:  wait,  that's not quite fair,  we should just be talking about how many records an artist sold in the decade of the 1960s.  So, apparently the Beatles sold 450 million records "world wide".  Pat Boone sold 45 million.  Looks like the Beatles sold  10 times as many.

But I don't know why this needs to be debated anymore.  If you or anyone prefers Pat Boone's music to the Beatles,  that's your prerogative. "Moody River"'s kind of nice.  Depressing lyrics, though.

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Cloudburst (1951)
 

A cryptographer is very much in love with his wife and is facing a future of untold happiness with her. This is disturbed when a criminal fleeing a scene kills her in a hit-and-run.

I was attracted to this movie because it stars Robert Preston and is labelled as a noir. I know him only from his comedic roles. I must admit that I did not at first recognize him. He is lean and not quite as handsome as later became. It was difficult for me to accept him as a loving husband and devoted father-to-be because he presents so perfectly a man with a dark cloud over his soul. That is perfect for the latter part of the movie because he shows that he is in his element and acting naturally as he hunts the murderer.

There is not a sour note nor drab performance by any of the cast.

It did seem to me to lack serious suspense which I like to see in a noir. This is rather straightforward and nearly a documentary on how to avenge a wrongful death.

6.8/10

I watched it on: Amazon Prime Video but when I wished to check a small portion for this posting I found that it has moved to a premium channel. I can find no other streaming service which carries it.

 

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8 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

. . . .we should just be talking about how many records an artist sold. . . . 

Not quite. It depends which charts and how they are compiled.  Pat Boone's bragging rights are related to Top 40 and in the 50s the Top 40 charts measured radio play. 

 

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7 hours ago, kingrat said:

Roy, IIRC if your name wasn't above the title, you were considered "Featured" for purposes of the Tony, no matter the length of the part.

Thanks, that makes some sense .

And I neglected to mention that it was Mary Fickett, later of soap opera fame, who received the Featured Actress nomination for Eleanor. 

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6 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Not sure why you're taking it personally- just facts. easy to find.

I'm glad it was asked because what ElCid wrote was not clear to me either. Nothing personal. I generally like ElCid's posts (although like Mikey, seems not to like anything 😉)

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Lord knows I've typed my share of sentences thinking my intentions were perfectly clear to be called out with

th?id=OIP.2MspI-tHCYXGqZbkBRD4awHaDh&pid

or worse an argument based on misunderstanding. Writing is an art few of us master, and I enjoy participating on this message board to learn better skills.

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16 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

There were quite a few good TV themes in the 80s as well, but by the mid 90s it was clear that TV was trying to purge themselves of them. 

It literally started with eliminating the commercials BETWEEN programs, which might give audiences a one-minute temptation to change channels.

By that point, of course, they had already come for TV show end-credits, and squashed them into sidebars to create more room for network promos.

21 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I've seen the movie; however, I already knew a lot of Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor.  She gets mocked today for being rather unattractive - but she was one of the finest 1st ladies of the 20th century. 

Don't hear of much of her being mocked for appearance, but in her day, she was frequently kidded for going everywhere and doing everything.

It wasn't until Judy Garland in Babes in Arms that I became aware that it was popular to do comic imitations of Eleanor Roosevelt in the late 30's, from her running news-radio feature:   "MYYYY Daaaayyyy..."

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Many Rivers To Cross (1955)

Frontier comedy from MGM, featuring Robert Taylor as a woman chased Kentucky fur trapper who doesn't want to settle down, and Eleanor Parker as the sole female member of an all male family who sets her cap for him and will resort to just about anything to marry him.

The film alternates between comedy and a bit of adventure involving Indians (but even that is decidedly light hearted), its colour backdrops varying between transparently obvious studio sets and some location shooting of (California presumably) rivers and bush country.

It's a generally laboured, lame attempt at broad humour. Parker is feisty in her role but Taylor has the light comedy touch of a bowling ball. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the film are the well known names of its supporting cast. Victor McLaglen is the father of Parker's family, with the sons including both Russ Tamblyn and Jeff Richards right out of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. James Arness, on the verge of TV immorality as Matt Dillon, is a frontiersman who likes nothing better than a good natured punch up with any like minded male who comes along (particularly any of those who say "What's the weather like up there?" when they look up at his 6'5" frame). Also in the cast are Alan Hale Jr. as a roughneck neighbour engaged to Parker and Russell Johnson as yet another one of her brothers, nine years before these two would be re-teamed as the Skipper and the Professor in Gilligan's Island.

Additional small roles are played by studio system stalwarts Rosemary DeCamp, Sig Rumann, Rhys Williams and Josephine Hutchinson.

Many Rivers To Cross was the last of three films that teamed Taylor with Parker, and both actors would call the other one of their favourite co-stars (plenty of rumours circulated that they were more than just chummy). For me this film was strictly a one time viewing only timer waster.

Many Rivers to Cross (MGM, 1955). British Quad (30" X 39.75"). | Lot #53276  | Heritage Auctions

2 out of 4

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14 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Ok,  but the era Mad Men covers is mostly the '60s, the entire decade.  Pat Boone may have been one of the top bestsellers in the early '60s,  but by the time the Beatles and the British Invasion came along, not to mention all the great American R and B, soul, and Motown,  I seriously doubt Mr. Boone could keep up with any of them.

Boone had already made his mark at outselling most of them.

Mad Men begins in  March 1960 and ends in Nov. 1970. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mad_Men

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14 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Never cared for any of what?  The hits of the Beatles and the Stones,  or those of Pat Boone ?   Or  maybe the walk-in tubs ?

Never cared for the music of The Beatles, the Rolling Stones nor Pat Boone.

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Boone would have 38 Top 40 and six No. 1 hits and still holds the record for having at least one single on the Billboard pop charts for 220 consecutive weeks.

 

On Billboard's ranking of all Top 40 artists of the rock era from 1955 to 1995, Boone stands No. 9, right behind the Rolling Stones and just ahead of the Beach Boys.  https://www.investors.com/news/management/leaders-and-success/pat-boone-has-been-singing-60-years/

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On 6/17/2021 at 11:07 PM, misswonderly3 said:

I absolutely loved Mad Men.  I watched it after the series had almost finished;  meaning,  I didn't catch it when it was first aired ,  I actually took  out the DVD sets from my local  video rental place  (which still exists !)  and binged on it that way.  I couldn't stop watching it, and when I wasn't watching it, I was thinking about it.  All the characters are so finely drawn,  so real.  You care about all of them, even the dislikeable ones.  Mad Men had everything...great, unforgettable characters,  fascinating storylines,  authentically recreated '60s culture,  really funny moments,  really sad ones.    Great show, one of the best of the kind of "streamed" television series that are now hugely common, but were still unusual for the time they came out. 

Mad Men is my favorite tv show of ALL TIME. I watched the show from the time it first aired and have seen every episode many times but not in a long time.  Brilliant casting, brilliant writing, the look of the show, the sets, the clothes, very authentic.  Matthew Weiner is an incredible talent. His work on The Sopranos and Mad Men proves that. Everything about Mad Men was perfect. Years ago we had lengthy conversations about the show. Some of us even wrote stories about the characters, that was a lot of fun. I'd love to rewatch the show again, I don't think I'd ever get tired of watching Mad Men.

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I agree with you Tiki.  But it is how you fill those hours.  I love My Fair Lady; however, some of it could have been cut (like allowing "I'm Getting Married in the Morning" to run ad nauseum).  Martin S. needs a good editor - with the way films are offered now (and even before the pandemic and all these streaming services), many director, etc. forgot that people can only sit for so long before they get fidgety or need to use the facilities.  Sunrise and C. is well worth it, as is GWTW.  The same is true today of TV Shows - I don't need two-hour plus or two-part or longer finales.  Ralph B. was a versatile actor.  He does a great turn in His Girl Friday opposite Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell!  I've seen the movie; however, I already knew a lot of Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor.  She gets mocked today for being rather unattractive - but she was one of the finest 1st ladies of the 20th century.  Also, I believe the media had an agreement about photographing Roosevelt in a wheelchair.  Not happy about his turning away the St. Louis, but I know of someone who actually got off the boat.

Now, has there ever been a movie made about Harry Truman?

 

As for what I just watched - right now I'm watching my computer and what is going outside my window.  Before that, it was the Today Show and some local news.  Nick Wallenda just walked the tightrope again; this made it on the tonight show - Amazon boxes with masks being delivered to a home circa where I live.  Goodbye Mr. Chips is fairly long, but worth every moment of it.  Great performance by Robert Donat.  Another movie he is in (his last - and the role he played wouldn't be considered politically correct today) is Inn of Sixth Happiness (based on a true story and starring the great Ingrid Bergman).

 

 

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I loved Mad Men, but now you have to subscribe to a service to get it.  I don't agree with a great deal of commentary on it. I worked in advertising and it is about smoke and mirrors.  Peggy need Don Draper (Dick W.) as an inspiration.  I like to think that, ultimately, January Jones didn't die of breast cancer, and reunited in some way with her ex.  In my screwy mind, Don Draper and Bets? (was that her name) reminded me physically of Darrin and Samantha on Bewitched.

 

I'm trying to post a YouTube video of what I just watched (again and again).  Kevin Kline dancing to "I Will Survive" from In and Out!  Appropriate on so many levels.  Wish I could have seen him on Broadway or Shakespeare in the Park.  Great Performance from Tom Selleck also (who was once rumored to be gay).

 

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2 hours ago, ElCid said:

Never cared for the music of The Beatles, the Rolling Stones nor Pat Boone.

:blink:  Just you?  Or all your other friends in AL-QAEDA too?  ;) 

But to be more serious,  I did go out of my way to buy a copy of Boone's "Speedy Gonzales".  But, I was 10 years old at the time, and a big fan of the cartoon.

Sepiatone

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pretty routine FEAR THY NEIGHBOR on thursday night.

fighting over a fence again, and the story is definitely told from the POV of only one side...that doesn't mean i think the other guy was perfect, i just think the truth is that both sides are usually awful.

first episode of the season that i'd recommend giving a pass to.

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10 hours ago, SansFin said:

Cloudburst (1951)
 

A cryptographer is very much in love with his wife and is facing a future of untold happiness with her. This is disturbed when a criminal fleeing a scene kills her in a hit-and-run.

I was attracted to this movie because it stars Robert Preston and is labelled as a noir. I know him only from his comedic roles. I must admit that I did not at first recognize him. He is lean and not quite as handsome as later became. It was difficult for me to accept him as a loving husband and devoted father-to-be because he presents so perfectly a man with a dark cloud over his soul. That is perfect for the latter part of the movie because he shows that he is in his element and acting naturally as he hunts the murderer.

There is not a sour note nor drab performance by any of the cast.

It did seem to me to lack serious suspense which I like to see in a noir. This is rather straightforward and nearly a documentary on how to avenge a wrongful death.

 

I saw this several years ago on TCM, and was attracted to it because of the cryptography angle, which turned out to be nothing, However, I was fairly captivated by Preston's performance as a husband seeking revenge.

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Mad Men is available on IMDb.  I get it via Amazon, but as a freebee.  Either through Spectrum or Sony (bought a Sony TV).

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10 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I'm glad it was asked because what ElCid wrote was not clear to me either. Nothing personal. I generally like ElCid's posts (although like Mikey, seems not to like anything 😉)

hqdefault.jpg

Lord knows I've typed my share of sentences thinking my intentions were perfectly clear to be called out with

th?id=OIP.2MspI-tHCYXGqZbkBRD4awHaDh&pid

or worse an argument based on misunderstanding. Writing is an art few of us master, and I enjoy participating on this message board to learn better skills.

When i was shown the fact that Pat Boone sold more records than the bands people tend to think of now when looking back on the 50s and 60s, i was surprised, and i just liked that Mad Men showed this side of the era, not the now dominant take on the counter culture bands of the 60's that get all the attention now days.  i still couldn't tell you a single name of a Pat Boone song or record.

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14 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Not quite. It depends which charts and how they are compiled.  Pat Boone's bragging rights are related to Top 40 and in the 50s the Top 40 charts measured radio play. 

 

Yes,  but I specified I wasn't talking about the 1950s,  just the decade 1960 -1969.  This whole thing came up because we were talking about the tv show Mad Men, which, except for maybe the very first episode,  is set entirely in the 1960s.

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7 hours ago, ElCid said:

Boone had already made his mark at outselling most of them.

Mad Men begins in  March 1960 and ends in Nov. 1970. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mad_Men

I really cannot believe Pat Boone outsold the Beatles or the Rolling Stones,  whatever decade we're talking about. Where are you guys getting your info on this stuff?

And yes, of course I know the era Mad Men covered -  that's the whole point I'm making, we're talking about one ten year period,   the 1960s.

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7 hours ago, ElCid said:

Never cared for the music of The Beatles, the Rolling Stones nor Pat Boone.

ElCid,  truly,  I don't mean any offence or aggression,  but honestly,  what do you care for?  It seems like there are a great many things you do not like. For example,  I once asked you,  on the Noir Alley thread,  what noirs you like, because there seemed to be so many you did not enjoy.  But I never got an answer.

I do know you like old cars.

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26 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Yes,  but I specified I wasn't talking about the 1950s,  just the decade 1960 -1969.  This whole thing came up because we were talking about the tv show Mad Men, which, except for maybe the very first episode,  is set entirely in the 1960s.

That's fine. But you were focusing on sales. The fact beneath the Pat Boone mythology is based on specific charts. Primarily Top 40. 

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30 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

That's fine. But you were focusing on sales. The fact beneath the Pat Boone mythology is based on specific charts. Primarily Top 40. 

I was focussing on sales of these artists during the 1960s, because that's when  Man Men is set.

Actually,  I've grown weary of this argument.   If you guys want to insist that Pat Boone sold more records than the Beatles or the Rolling Stones or whoever,  or that Pat Boone,  over the long haul,  was the more popular artist  ( although honestly I do find that hard to believe)  then fine.   It's not that interesting a discussion. 

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14 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

.... over the long haul,  was the more popular artist.... 

I've made no such claim and I agree, it's a boring argument.  I'm just trying -and apparently failing- to explain how the charts can be cherry picked to create a distorted  historical accounting.

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