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 High Fidelity

John Cusack, Jack Black, Todd Louiso (aka the AuPair from Jerry Maguire)

Rob (Cusack) fresh from a break up with his attorney girlfriend reflects on his Top 5 all time breakups while running a hole in the wall record store and organizing his extensive personal record collection "autobiographically". His staff (Black and Louiso) are long on music knowledge and opinion but very, very, short on tolerance and customer service when customers tastes conflict with theirs. There ARE record stores like this! Bruce Springsteen shows up for a cameo. 

Saw this movie when it came out and didn't think that much of it, this time I really enjoyed it. Actually watching it helped.

high-fidelity-6.jpg?quality=80&strip=all

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.the Illustrated Man,.

_

Dont, Think i,ve (ever) Scene thisone Before. ...

.

    Liked It,.

👏🎨👙🍻🥂

...

Very.. Slow Paced (imo)... ..so, ...if "You" Get the Fidgits and the Squirms thru Slow; albeit Impressive and Recommendable Scripts..

- ...Turn Away Now. lol

. ... ..

Steiger Attacks His Role with Ease, (at times) Immersive Introspection, .. and Competence,.

     Madam Bloom, (Attacks) Her Character .. with Sexy.. .....Theraputic (for me, at least) Eloquence, Grace,, and Persistence...

 

 

..and Again, Kalos Competence... ,

. ... .. .....

Could it have beenBetter.,?..

..Yes ... .. it Probably (even) Could Have (been ..) ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

But id Watch This Feature w/out a' Moment of Pause for (further) thought over the likes of a tenet; ,or an inception...

 

 

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13 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Bets? (was that her name)

 

Betty, aka "Bets" or "Birdie".

 

"Mad Men" is surely one of the great TV shows of the 21st century.

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9 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Saw this movie when it came out and didn't think that much of it, this time I really enjoyed it. Actually watching it helped.

Thanks Moe. I patronized record stores all my life (still do) and am familiar with quirky staff, I'm a quirky patron. I wasn't impressed at all seeing it either but based on your comments, I'll give it another shot!

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10 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

 High Fidelity

John Cusack, Jack Black, Todd Louiso (aka the AuPair from Jerry Maguire)

Rob (Cusack) fresh from a break up with his attorney girlfriend reflects on his Top 5 all time breakups while running a hole in the wall record store and organizing his extensive personal record collection "autobiographically". His staff (Black and Louiso) are long on music knowledge and opinion but very, very, short on tolerance and customer service when customers tastes conflict with theirs. There ARE record stores like this! Bruce Springsteen shows up for a cameo. 

Saw this movie when it came out and didn't think that much of it, this time I really enjoyed it. Actually watching it helped.

high-fidelity-6.jpg?quality=80&strip=all

Amazon Prime Recently did a series based on HIGH FIDELITY, Which featured a young black actress (the daughter of Lisa Bonet and Lenny Kravitz actually) in the Cusack role Of a lovelorn record store employee who obsesses about their romantic failures and often frames them in terms of classic records.

I never saw it, but recently it was not renewed and there was a minor furor online about it, it apparently had a lot of fans.

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Bonjour Tristesse Poster

Bonjour Tristesse (1958) TCM 8/10

I just saw this again on TCM this morning.

It's a strange but fascinating film with David Niven and Jean Seberg as a father and daughter who act more like lovers. Widower Niven has taken up with an energetic and fun loving younger mistress ( a scene stealing Mylene Demongeot) while he also has a more age appropriate fiancee played by Deborah Kerr. And they all meet up in a gorgeous French Rivera location. This was the same year Niven and Kerr appeared in Separate Tables, she was nominated for an Oscar, he won. 

When I first saw it, I found it a bit frustrating, I kept thinking "where is this going" and then when I saw the ending (which I won't reveal) , it was devastating and haunting. I understood why the flashbacks were in sumptuous color and present day were in stark black and white. The cinematography is stunning in both, this one cries out to be on Criterion Blu ray.

What are your opinions of this one? 

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16 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I really cannot believe Pat Boone outsold the Beatles or the Rolling Stones,  whatever decade we're talking about. Where are you guys getting your info on this stuff?

And yes, of course I know the era Mad Men covered -  that's the whole point I'm making, we're talking about one ten year period,   the 1960s.

Didn't say he outsold The Beatles or Rolling Stones, but that he outsold most other singers and groups from his era.  Also, that he was popular in more fields than his contemporaries.  

16 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

ElCid,  truly,  I don't mean any offence or aggression,  but honestly,  what do you care for?  It seems like there are a great many things you do not like. For example,  I once asked you,  on the Noir Alley thread,  what noirs you like, because there seemed to be so many you did not enjoy.  But I never got an answer.

I do know you like old cars.

I care for music from the late 50's and early 60's in particular.  There are many artists from the late 60's and into 70's as well.  Beach music, Doo W o p, classic R&R, some Country, etc. Do enjoy many artists up until the 1990's as well, but not going to start listing them.

As for Noirs, I like most of them and have commented on that but too many to list.  I think that lately Eddie has been showing Noirs that I don't like, so I commented on them.  But, I like The Blue Gardenia, which is showing today - I have it on DVD so not watching it.  Did watch Eddie's intro and will catch the outro. 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Amazon Prime Recently did a series based on HIGH FIDELITY, Which featured a young black actress (the daughter of Lisa Bonet and Lenny Kravitz actually) in the Cusack role Of a lovelorn record store employee who obsesses about their romantic failures and often frames them in terms of classic records.

I never saw it, but recently it was not renewed and there was a minor furor online about it, it apparently had a lot of fans.

Hmmmm. Lisa Bonnet is in High Fidelity playing a hipster singer. She does a sorta Sade version of a Peter Frampton tune "Baby I Love Your Way".

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9 hours ago, Vidor said:

"Mad Men" is surely one of the great TV shows of the 21st century.

I gave up on it after a fairly considerable number of episodes. The show at some point insisted on making each individual episode thematically uniform. Nothing wrong with that but soon that became more important than character development, and for a show with narrative integrity from episode to episode It became to annoying to notice that the main characters were not true to their own selves, acting in ways that answered to whatever the theme of the episode was rather than who they were as individuals. I believe this was incrementally progressive and at some point for me I had to give up out of exasperation. This was some years ago and I wish I had a precise example but I don't. I do remember the last episode I could stomach was the blonde Mrs acting totally out of character in Italy somewhere. Still, there was some really good stuff there but the show lost its way for me, or vice versa.

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Interesting take on Mad Men.

I do have specific episodes I highly prefer, like The Suitcase and The Beautiful Girls, both from Season 4.

I particularly love Girls because it is the only instance all of the major women in Don's life are together.  Betty, I recall,  rarely appears at the office.

 

HIz5bj1.jpg

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5 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Bonjour Tristesse Poster

Bonjour Tristesse (1958) TCM 8/10

I just saw this again on TCM this morning.

It's a strange but fascinating film with David Niven and Jean Seberg as a father and daughter who act more like lovers. Widower Niven has taken up with an energetic and fun loving younger mistress ( a scene stealing Mylene Demongeot) while he also has a more age appropriate fiancee played by Deborah Kerr. And they all meet up in a gorgeous French Rivera location. This was the same year Niven and Kerr appeared in Separate Tables, she was nominated for an Oscar, he won. 

When I first saw it, I found it a bit frustrating, I kept thinking "where is this going" and then when I saw the ending (which I won't reveal) , it was devastating and haunting. I understood why the flashbacks were in sumptuous color and present day were in stark black and white. The cinematography is stunning in both, this one cries out to be on Criterion Blu ray.

What are your opinions of this one? 

I'm sorry, Det. Jim,  I had no patience with  this film.  Now, I did see it only once,  and sometimes a person needs to see a movie a second time to really form an opinion.  Maybe I should give it another chance.

However,  I doubt I would like it any better a second time.  I actually really dislike those films that were so popular in the 1950s,  a certain kind of melodrama that featured a young person who is confused and self-absorbed  ( I realize most young people from any era, including today, fit that description.)  It reminded me a little of Member of the Wedding,  another '50s era drama about a young girl who is figuring out who she is, and in the process,  behaves in  selfish and silly ways.  I just found this character  (from Member of the Wedding)  annoying,  I had no patience with her.   And my reaction to the Cecile character in Bonjour Tristesse was similar.

None of the tragic events that occurred in Bonjour Tristesse had to happen, they were the result of manipulation and thoughtless contrivances on the part of Cecile and her friends.  So it's hard for me to be sympathetic to her, or for that matter, any of the characters in the story -- maybe with the exception of Anne.

The shallowness of David Niven's character and his daughter just makes it hard for me to get engaged in what happens to them.  I don't need models of virtue  (sometimes the badder the character, the more engaging they are)  nor do I want intellectual giants in movies;  but they have to be interesting in some way,  and I just found this family to be boring, they had nothing interesting to offer.  
What do I care if they enjoy their life of hedonism?  Cecile and her father, along with the boyfriend and the father's lover  (before Anne came along)  all struck me as too shallow and silly to get involved in.

SPOILER    I also think the Deborah Kerr  character was too grounded and strong to end things as she did.  

And what do we "get" from Bonjour Tristesse ?  The father and daughter seem to be just living the same way as ever in the end,  maybe sadder but not much wiser.  The whole film feels flat and pointless to me.

Sorry,  I don't mean to be aggressive in my criticism of this movie,  and I know a lot of people really like it.  (But you did ask, so there you go ! )

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9 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Sorry,  I don't mean to be aggressive in my criticism of this movie,  and I know a lot of people really like it

That's OK, no need to apologize for saying something you really mean.

What about the scenery and that beautiful house? And what did you think of the color and B&W cinematography?

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Rather than validate Random-Space Boy's meta-post with the psychological attention of quoting it--
I'll just second the story of seeing The Illustrated Man (1969) with a late-night college-festival audience years ago, and "slow and squirmy" definitely describes the audience's reaction to waiting for something to happen.

We could follow the plot premise of our hero "seeing" short stories in Rod Steiger's tattoos, but as the movie went on, the audience became a little more impatient and vocal.  As we see a soft-focus love scene between Steiger and Claire Bloom, and the movie suddenly cuts back to our hero staring into the fire, there was a big disappointed groan from the audience and one person called out "Aww, c'mon...CONCENTRATE!"  😂

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8 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

 

What about the scenery and that beautiful house? And what did you think of the color and B&W cinematography?

The setting and the cinematography were the best things about the film.  And yes,  the different uses of colour and   Black and white  were very innovative.

11 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

That's OK, no need to apologize for saying something you really mean.

Thanks,  I'm glad you realize I wasn't trying to "attack" you or anyone else who enjoyed the film.  🙂

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3 hours ago, laffite said:

I gave up on it after a fairly considerable number of episodes. The show at some point insisted on making each individual episode thematically uniform. Nothing wrong with that but soon that became more important than character development, and for a show with narrative integrity from episode to episode It became to annoying to notice that the main characters were not true to their own selves, acting in ways that answered to whatever the theme of the episode was rather than who they were as individuals. I believe this was incrementally progressive and at some point for me I had to give up out of exasperation. This was some years ago and I wish I had a precise example but I don't. I do remember the last episode I could stomach was the blonde Mrs acting totally out of character in Italy somewhere. Still, there was some really good stuff there but the show lost its way for me, or vice versa.

I watched every episode of Mad Men when it originally came out.  Then watched all the episodes again when they did the marathon at the end of the series.  I also purchased the DVD set and watched about 10 or so episodes.  Then returned it as it was of poor quality.  Some DVD's could not be played.  Also, each DVD was  in a paper holder that was so tight you had to reach inside and forcibly remove the DVD - not good.  I just finished watching every episode again on IMDb.  

Neither my wife nor I observed the "thematically uniform" episodes.  However, this may be something many series do. Regardless, we both enjoyed watching the series again.

Not sure what you mean by thematically uniform?   I much preferred scenes in the office or that actually related to advertising and products of the period.   Cared less for Don's home life, as well as Peggy's.  Incidentally, Peggy played the daughter in The West Wing.

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7 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Bonjour Tristesse Poster

Bonjour Tristesse (1958) TCM 8/10

I just saw this again on TCM this morning.

It's a strange but fascinating film with David Niven and Jean Seberg as a father and daughter who act more like lovers. Widower Niven has taken up with an energetic and fun loving younger mistress ( a scene stealing Mylene Demongeot) while he also has a more age appropriate fiancee played by Deborah Kerr. And they all meet up in a gorgeous French Rivera location. This was the same year Niven and Kerr appeared in Separate Tables, she was nominated for an Oscar, he won. 

When I first saw it, I found it a bit frustrating, I kept thinking "where is this going" and then when I saw the ending (which I won't reveal) , it was devastating and haunting. I understood why the flashbacks were in sumptuous color and present day were in stark black and white. The cinematography is stunning in both, this one cries out to be on Criterion Blu ray.

What are your opinions of this one? 

One of my favorites. I love everything about this film except the revoltingly ugly sack dress that Deborah Kerr wears in one scene, and even that is historically accurate. The sack dress was the "in" thing for a season, till someone noticed that it was unflattering to women and as ugly as homemade sin. But back to the movie: I consider this Otto Preminger's masterpiece, with beautiful fluid camerawork, especially the scenes at the vacation home in the south of France. A fashion expert who introduced the film at one of the TCM festivals said that Jean Seberg's hairstyle and little black dress look just as chic now as they did in 1958. Fine acting by all, especially Jean Seberg in the lead role. The story of the girl who won't give up possession of her father until she belatedly realizes the cost rings true. The screenplay by Arthur Laurents is just about perfect. What does Laurents have to say about the film in his memoir? Not one word.

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6 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I just found this character  (from Member of the Wedding)  annoying,  I had no patience with her.

I like her but I know what you mean. The director of that film tried to reign in Harris, her staginess etc., but she ignored him.

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Identity Unknown (1945)

 

Four soldiers gallantly defend a position before an aerial bomb kills three. The movie starts with the fourth on a hospital ship with amnesia and the army does not know which one he is.

This is a bit of a propaganda piece about the noble spirit of soldiers and how they can solve all problems if given an opportunity. This is evidenced by his visiting the homes of all four men known to be in the farmhouse while he searches for his identity and rectifying complex problems with a few wise words.

Richard Arlen was a sort of on-again off-again leading man or supporting actor known for his stalwart features. His performance is competent even when his little speeches are a little more grandiose than they need to be.

This is a very workmanlike movie. There is little wrong with it and little right with it. I believe that a viewer is not supposed to question how a man could be in an explosion sufficiently powerful to blow off his dogtags but have no obvious injuries nor even facial abrasions. I was relieved at the end that they did not go for the obvious resolution. I can not speak of it for that would be a spoiler.

5/10

Available on: Paramount+ now and sometimes available elsewhere. 


 

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7 hours ago, ElCid said:

Neither my wife nor I observed the "thematically uniform" episodes.  However, this may be something many series do. Regardless, we both enjoyed watching the series again.

Not sure what you mean by thematically uniform?   I much preferred scenes in the office or that actually related to advertising and products of the period.   Cared less for Don's home life, as well as Peggy's.  Incidentally, Peggy played the daughter in The West Wing

The theme of an episode might be 'inability to communicate with each other' and that was what you would see regardless and at the expense of narrative flow. I don't claim perspicacity in noticing this. Occasionally following an episode there would be a video when one of the show runners would sit there and the first thing out of his mouth was "NOW THE THEME OF THIS EPISODE" (caps for emphasis) and then he would explicate the whole thing. The show was going out of its way to maintain the integrity of the theme, not necessarily of the show as a whole, but by episode. That's what I mean by "thematically uniform" but that's a poor phrase. Anyway that is how I first noticed it and it didn't bother me for awhile until it did. This should not necessarily ruin a show, especially as good as this one should have been IMO, but I grew wary and began to lose interest. Each episode was a little show in itself. I think this can happen with a show where it is obvious that the underlying narrative is made to be secondary but I when character development and consistency in behavior is severely compromised, the story stops working for me. Consistency in the behavior of the characters is immensely more important to me than an arbitrary decision to hammer home a theme theme theme, a different one for each episode.

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6 hours ago, kingrat said:

 

The screenplay by Arthur Laurents is just about perfect. What does Laurents have to say about the film in his memoir? Not one word.

Maybe that's because he knew he'd done better work  than "Bonjour Tristesse" and didn't want to draw attention to it.

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Always coming late to the party, last night I watched HBO's documentary on the BeeGees, HOW CAN YOU MEND A BROKEN HEART? '20. I'm pretty critical of documentaries and while appreciating their contribution to music, not really a big fan. But, being into music I knew there would be lots to learn here & I wasn't disappointed. (Maurice was married to Lulu!)

I absolutely cannot tolerate dramatizations with actors recreating incidents & thankfully there's enough real footage of the "brothers Gibb" that wasn't necessary. I also loathe talking heads of current stars telling us how much the subject meant to them. I don't care about opinions, just facts and maybe some professional insights.

This documentary really stuck to the facts and crafted a coherent story arc of their lives & career. It pretty much reiterated their career WAS their lives. The longevity of their career was from hard work, dedication and talent times three. I was glad Andy Gibbs' story was included as well. A lot of their music was played to support the story and my only complaint was not enough isolated vocal tracks were used. It's all about their voices, when isolated so you can hear nothing else- MAGICAL.

A lot of time was spent discussing the production of the Saturday Night Fever LP, rightly so. Although not in my library, the LP was a force and really propelled the movie rather than the other way around. The details included were fascinating, bringing new life to these old chestnuts.

The Gibbs were an incredibly tight, ever expanding  family and the gist of the story is told through Barry, the last surviving member. While heartbreaking to see him solo, this story is really a celebration of these extraordinary lives & all the joy their work brought the world. So even if you're not a "fan" after watching this documentary, you at least gain appreciation of their huge contribution to pop music and a little insight to the men they were. 

The-Bee-Gees-How-Can-You-Mend-a-Broken-H

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Always coming late to the party,

it's fine, i know you've been busy what with hanging out on the TCM HOME PAGE all weekend.

(they're using your avatar to promote SILENT SUNDAYS)

it's funny how certain posters have avatars that over time you literally expect them to look like.

I know, sadly, this is likely true for me.

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in re THE BEE GEES, I was only alive for two years of the 1970's but if you asked me to distill the PURE ESSENCE OF THE ERA into MUSICAL FORM, I would direct you to the progression that begins 18 seconds in to the song below (AND REPRISES AT THE 1:40 MARK.)

PURE EXCITEMENT.

 

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15 hours ago, kingrat said:

One of my favorites. I love everything about this film except the revoltingly ugly sack dress that Deborah Kerr wears in one scene, and even that is historically accurate. The sack dress was the "in" thing for a season, till someone noticed that it was unflattering to women and as ugly as homemade sin.

i THINK YOU'RE BEING UNFAIR TO HOMEMADE SIN HERE, but I am 100% with everything else you say...although I'm not entirely convinced by JEAN SEBERG'S PERFORMANCE, she- however- was a pioneer of the KIM BASINGER SCHOOL of tremulous, constantly repressed volatility encased within a STUNNING BEAUTY.

I could not find the sack dress, but I did find this:

Bonjour Tristesse - 50s Otto Preminger film starring David Niven Jean  Seberg Deborah Kerr" Graphic T-Shirt Dress by Amberflash | Redbubble

which i would 100% wear as a night shirt.

When I was living in Los Angeles, I used to walk to the HOLLYWOOD LIBRARY ON SUNSET BLVD and rent BONJOUR TRISTESSE on DVD.

I also adore it- so much so that in the three screenplays that I have writteN, I always include a scene where FOUR DISPARATE CHARACTERS PLAY A GAME OF BRIDGE. I just adore everything about that scene. 

I also, whenever I have a plant die in my garden (or some across a dead bird or turtle) I sing a modified version of the FRENCH SONG Plaisir D'Amour (sic?) wherein I sing "Bon-jour, tristesssse. Bonjour tristesse avec moi..." as I walk to the trash with it.

the only thing that kinda bugs me a little about BONJOUR TRISTESSE is the blocking of the actors during the SHOCKING CLIMAX, there is something about the way SEBERG stalks DEBORAH KERR through the cliffside forest that seems a little...Wile E. Coyote-esque, I think?

 

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