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In the Bee Gees documentary, did they talk about their late brother, Andy Gibb (once involved with Olivia Newton John)?  I saw Saturday Night Fever and the sequel.  Like Finola Hughes of GH, and Sly Stallone directed 2nd one.  Also saw the Peter Frampton version of Sgt. Pepper (which was dreadful - I had the Sgt. Pepper Album and the movie was dreadful - if you remember vinyl records, the cover of Sgt. Pepper is amazing with all the different people on it).  When we got the album, I was shocked because the Beatles were no longer the 4, clean-cut Mop Tops.  Sad that Barry Gibb is the only one left.

Sack Dress - basic A-line in picture above - which I like.

As for me, other than watching my computer screen, watched some YouTube clips of Judy Holliday in honor of what would have been her 100th birthday.  Started a separate thread about it.

 

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24 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

 Like Finola Hughes of GH, and Sly Stallone directed 2nd one. 

aka STAYING ALIVE (1980)- one of the greatest film comedies of all time, intentional or otherwise.

I adore it.

See the source image

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

In the Bee Gees documentary, did they talk about their late brother, Andy Gibb (once involved with Olivia Newton John)? 

Yes, they did cover his coming to America and his instant rise to fame. Although they often performed together, it was pointed out they were even more successful dividing & conquering their slightly different genres-Andy being more a teen heart throb. I thought too Andy's great love was Victoria Principal not ONJ. I always had great empathy for her, even without being in the public eye, it's a horrible position to be in. But it was stated at the end Andy died at 30 from a heart attack most likely caused by chronic drug use.

It's funny, growing up in the 60's the bulk of my experience with The BeeGees was their earlier work, which is just beautiful. I put them right up there with The Carpenters-didn't like the music, but have complete respect for their talent.

The BeeGees and Barry Gibb in particular, was brought up a few notches finding out he wrote most all their hits. An impressive accomplishment.

I understand the same filmmaker has just released a documentary of one of my fave bands SPARKS! I bet few of you have ever heard of them, but I was a record store hangout (& groupie) & they were a hit with me.

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24 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

 

I understand the same filmmaker has just released a documentary of one of my fave bands SPARKS! I bet few of you have ever heard of them, but I was a record store hangout (& groupie) & they were a hit with me.

I saw them twice in 1975-76 in MontreaI.I liked them then but after it is a different story for me.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

aka STAYING ALIVE (198*)- one of the greatest film comedies of all time, intentional or otherwise.

I adore it.

1983, btw:  There were a lot of minor Fame-knockoff "Dancers on Broadway" movies in the late 70's, all hoping to beat the inevitable A Chorus Line movie to the punch, and none of them did well--

And while we know that Tony Manero settled down with the uptown dancer for a career, the supposed quote-fingers "Saturday Night Fever sequel" is so FAR removed from the gritty Brooklyn original, I'm guessing it may have started life as a generic Broadway-dancer movie that Paramount decided to spice up with a little corporate movie-franchise self-reference.  Just a theory, but the evidence has to be out there.

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1 hour ago, Roy Cronin said:

I didn't know Andy had a relationship with Olivia.

i forgot someone mentioned NEWTON-JOHN a few posts ago and for a good while after reading this, all I could think to myself was "DeHAVILLAND???!!!!"

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14 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i forgot someone mentioned NEWTON-JOHN a few posts ago and for a good while after reading this, all I could think to myself was "DeHAVILLAND???!!!!"

Olivia had only one boyfriend.

Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies Host, Dies at 84 - The New York Times

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Oh! The intersection of Olivia NJ and Staying Alive: released the same year as "Two of a Kind", a Travolta dud....

But two glorious ONJ late recording career hits:  Strange Twist of Fate and Livin in Desperate Times.  The MTV videos are fabulous!

The early 80s were just sublime.

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7 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

Oh! The intersection of Olivia NJ and Staying Alive: released the same year as "Two of a Kind", a Travolta dud....

But two glorious ONJ late recording career hits:  Strange Twist of Fate and Livin in Desperate Times.  The MTV videos are fabulous!

The early 80s were just sublime.

Believe it or not, STAYING ALIVE didn't do too badly at the box office! (it made nowhere near as much as SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, but earned a pretty respectable haul considering it's such a....unique film.)

 

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Watched over a long weekend (some reason I took Friday off work to watch a boring match between England and Scotland):


Four Boys and a Gun (1957) Delinquent youth crime noir.  Mostly silly but fun.

See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989) Would be a a good set-up for a comedy skit, but gets old for a full length feature.  Skip.

True Romance (1993) Top 100 for me- love it.   Only film I have a reference to tattooed on my body.

The Blue Gardenia (1953) LA noir featuring a performance of the title song by Nat King Cole.  Recommend.

On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) Had to re-watch after finishing the book.  Think it is top 5 Bond film and the first time there's some legitimately great action sequences in the series.

Jacob's Ladder (1990)  First time watching this and surprised that the twist ending was really a twist.  I felt through the whole movie that the ending was obvious.  Not a good as some people think but it did create a lot of new horror tropes that would be copied forever more.

Saboteur (1942) Early Hitchcock.  Loved it- although the blind man character seemed a bit hokey.  Surprised more people don't know about this Hitchcock film (outside of classic film lovers).  Recommend.

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Growing up in NY, Saboteur was shown often on tv. I would think it must have been shown other places too. Not sure why you think it's not a known film? The scene of Norman Lloyd falling from the Statue of Liberty is iconic in film history., I don't think Saboteur is one of Hitchcock's lesser known films. If I had to guess, I'd probably guess Stage Fright is not as well known as some of his other films.

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8 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Growing up in NY, Saboteur was shown often on tv. I would think it must have been shown other places too. Not sure why you think it's not a known film? The scene of Norman Lloyd falling from the Statue of Liberty is iconic in film history., I don't think Saboteur is one of Hitchcock's lesser known films. If I had to guess, I'd probably guess Stage Fright is not as well known as some of his other films.

It was my first time watching it.  I've never heard any of my film friends (either from film school or those working in the industry) talk about.  I'm surprised that i had never even seen the clip of Lloyd falling from the Statue of Liberty because it does seem like an iconic shot (although i do recall a similar scene with the statue of liberty in a cheesy 80's action film).  Can only speak of my experience and Saboteur was an unknown film for me and while not huge on Hitchcock, i've still seen probably half of his lengthy filmography.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

1983, btw:  There were a lot of minor Fame-knockoff "Dancers on Broadway" movies in the late 70's, all hoping to beat the inevitable A Chorus Line movie to the punch, and none of them did well--

And while we know that Tony Manero settled down with the uptown dancer for a career, the supposed quote-fingers "Saturday Night Fever sequel" is so FAR removed from the gritty Brooklyn original, I'm guessing it may have started life as a generic Broadway-dancer movie that Paramount decided to spice up with a little corporate movie-franchise self-reference.  Just a theory, but the evidence has to be out there.

Oh shoot!!!

im so sorry!!! 

genuinely, it’s a great movie (of its own kind), it deserves to have an accurate date!!!

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Really 1/2? Considering how many early films there are, that's impressive. I think Saboteur was probably one of the first Hitchcock films I've seen, probably watched it a dozen times when I was a young girl. Weird that your film school friends wouldn't know that film and shot of Norman Lloyd falling from the Stautue of Liberty. Well, it's good you now know the film.

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Yes, they did cover his coming to America and his instant rise to fame. Although they often performed together, it was pointed out they were even more successful dividing & conquering their slightly different genres-Andy being more a teen heart throb. I thought too Andy's great love was Victoria Principal not ONJ. I always had great empathy for her, even without being in the public eye, it's a horrible position to be in. But it was stated at the end Andy died at 30 from a heart attack most likely caused by chronic drug use.

It's funny, growing up in the 60's the bulk of my experience with The BeeGees was their earlier work, which is just beautiful. I put them right up there with The Carpenters-didn't like the music, but have complete respect for their talent.

The BeeGees and Barry Gibb in particular, was brought up a few notches finding out he wrote most all their hits. An impressive accomplishment.

I understand the same filmmaker has just released a documentary of one of my fave bands SPARKS! I bet few of you have ever heard of them, but I was a record store hangout (& groupie) & they were a hit with me.

I remember Sparks well! First discovered them in '82 hanging out , like you, at the local record store flipping through the racks trying to find some new punk records. Came across Angst in My Pants and wondered why Hitler was in a wedding dress. Got it home and wore that sucker out! Drove my local album rock station deejays to drink calling every hour harping on them to play Mickey Mouse at least once for God's sake.

Started looking into their previous stuff after that. Really a shame they never got over here in the states. Too literate.

The Mael Bros are still going strong from what I've heard. Working on a new release.

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2 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Watched over a long weekend (some reason I took Friday off work to watch a boring match between England and Scotland):


Four Boys and a Gun (1957) Delinquent youth crime noir.  Mostly silly but fun.

See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989) Would be a a good set-up for a comedy skit, but gets old for a full length feature.  Skip.

True Romance (1993) Top 100 for me- love it.   Only film I have a reference to tattooed on my body.

The Blue Gardenia (1953) LA noir featuring a performance of the title song by Nat King Cole.  Recommend.

On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) Had to re-watch after finishing the book.  Think it is top 5 Bond film and the first time there's some legitimately great action sequences in the series.

Jacob's Ladder (1990)  First time watching this and surprised that the twist ending was really a twist.  I felt through the whole movie that the ending was obvious.  Not a good as some people think but it did create a lot of new horror tropes that would be copied forever more.

Saboteur (1942) Early Hitchcock.  Loved it- although the blind man character seemed a bit hokey.  Surprised more people don't know about this Hitchcock film (outside of classic film lovers).  Recommend.

Great Honk! You had a swinging weekend.

True Romance is a major favorite in my family. Love Gary Oldman's racially confused drug kingpin Drexel. "He musta thought it was white boy day. . . "

And Jacob's Ladder a personal favorite. Love Saboteur too. Next time watch Lifeboat!

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

If OLIVIA had in fact dated one of the GIBBS, one can only IMAGINE what JOAN FONTAINE would have done to compensate/compete

maybe she and TITO JACKSON could have a fling?

Joan would have gone after either Bobby Sherman or Donny Osmond.

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Last night, one of the stations was running a Mr. Mom marathon.  Watched it again.  I first saw Teri Garr on a Star Trek episode (with Robert Lansing).  She used to appear on Letterman when he had the show on CBS.  She was stricken with a form of MS.  She was in Tootsie (Dustin Hoffman behaves like a **** to her), Young Frankenstein (just watched her again in that), Close Encounters (Richard D.'s wife?).  Just Googled her and found out she danced in a number of films.

Lifeboat is a great movie and it is fun to see how Hitchcock made his cameo appearance in that film.

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16 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Joan would have gone after either Bobby Sherman or Donny Osmond.

I dunno, I was thinking of ISLAND IN THE SUN, JOANS blockbuster interracial romantic film with HARRY BELAFONTE. (Which coincidentally never gets shown.)

Plus you’re never going to one up anybody by dating Donny Osmond.

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17 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Lifeboat is a great movie and it is fun to see how Hitchcock made his cameo appearance in that film.

That's a Trivial Pursuit question.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Believe it or not, STAYING ALIVE didn't do too badly at the box office! (it made nowhere near as much as SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, but earned a pretty respectable haul considering it's such a....unique film.)

 

Staying Alive was the 8th highest grossing film of 1983, following (in order), Return of the Jedi, Terms of Endearment, Flashdance, Trading Places, WarGames, Octopussy, and Sudden Impact, and just barely ahead of Mr Mom and Risky Business. Travolta's other 1983 film, Two of a Kind, was in 30th place. 

1983 was a very bizarre year though for films with a subliminal full-frontal shot in a PG rated Disney film (actually a good film, but that had to be a shock for family audiences), the whole gory deadly substory of Twilight Zone the movie, all the nuclear movies (and yes one was my top film for the year), lots of teen sex films, and some very unwelcome sequels. There were budget caps on many films that year, and I think it shows....... but there were some very good films that year.... I am including all of the 39 films i have seen from the year, ranked....


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THE EIGHTH HIGHEST GROSSER!!!!!!!??????

****, cocaine was insane in the 80s! 
 

STAYING ALIVE was- for a time at least- available on Amazon prime, I’m not sure if it still is, but I watched it one evening and nearly passed out from laughing. 

It is everything you would think a musical directed by Sylvester Stallone would be....And more.

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