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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

this is a HOLLYWOOD REPORTER interview with SHELLEY DUVALL. It starts out with unnecessary descriptions of how she looks now, but gets interesting after that.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/searching-for-shelley-duvall-the-reclusive-icon-on-fleeing-hollywood-and-the-scars-of-making-the-shining-4130256/

 

Thank you, Lorna. It's an interesting, thoughtful, respectful article. Shelley has beautiful eyes and a beautiful smile.

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First Cow

Director: Kelly Reichardt /   Starring  John Magaro  and Orion Lee   

This oddball little thing came out in March 2020. I think the intention was to show it in theatres, but the pandemic hit the very week it was released.  I believe you can stream it off of Hulu or Apple or something.  Maybe even Youtube.

Anyway, I'm not sure if it would have taken off  even if it had done a theatre run.  It is extremely non-commercial,  a very quiet, gentle,  and VERY slow-paced movie.  There's not much action til you're about half an hour into it.  In fact,  there's not much action at all, it's not really what you'd call an action -oriented film.   I kept thinking, "So, where's this cow?"

Oh, not really.  I don't mind this kind of movie, in fact, if it's well-done,  I really like them.  So, what's it about, other than a cow?  Well, it's set in Oregon, sometime in the 19th century  ( I think before the Civil War).  There's a mish-mash of what we now call "settlers",  fur trappers, miners  (I think), Indigenous people, and  immigrants from everywhere.  One of the immigrants,  a Chinese man with impeccable English, King-Lu,   befriends a young man who's made his way from the East  ( Boston, I think). The young Easterner is an excellent cook and baker, in fact,   his name is "Cookie", or so everyone calls him.  The two start hanging out together and talking about various ideas to make a success of their venture into the West .

The richest man in the territory happens to live just a short walk away from Cookie and King-Lu's shack in the Oregon forest,  and he just happens to own the first and only cow in the region.   Cookie and King-Lu conceive the idea of sneaking out at night ,  milking the cow,  and selling the baked treats  Cookie makes from the milk  (mainly "oily cakes", they look like doughnuts, the fritter kind) in the nearby settlement.  

Cookie's biscuits and oily cakes are a huge hit  (you find out he was apprenticed to a baker in Boston,  and learned the trade well.)  He purloins the milk and bakes the treats,  and King-Lu manages the business side of things.  They're doing wonderfully,  literally selling hot cakes, and over a few weeks  (I think it's weeks, the time-line is a little vague), they've made enough money to go to San Francisco and set up a bakery there.  Well, almost enough.  King -Lu wants to sell one more batch of cakes.

In the middle of their plans,  the rich man who owns the cow invites Cookie to bake him a "clafoutis",  a variety of fancy flan , to serve to a visiting guest he wants to show off to.  It is during a scene between the rich man and his guest that we are shown that the man is extremely cruel and heartless.  You realize that if he finds out Cookie and King-Lu are plundering his treasured cow's milk,  it will not go well for them.

The rest of the tale unfolds as one might expect.   Although this is definitely not the kind of movie where you need worry about giving away spoilers,  I'll leave the rest of the plot untold.  In any case,  the fate of Cookie and King-Lu is indicated in the first five minutes of the movie.

I'm afraid I've concentrated too much on the plot here, which is beside the point, since it's not really a very plot-oriented film.  It takes its time, as I said,   it is exceptionally slow-moving,  so if you lose patience with that sort of aesthetic,  First Cow is probably not for you.  What First Cow does well is show us, with I suspect an admirable degree of historical accuracy, what Oregon was like in the early 1800s.  It 's beautifully shot on location in the Oregon wilderness, and it's full of interesting details about how people lived  then,  why they would go to an undeveloped place like that, and what sort of dreams and ambitions people had then. Perhaps most of all it shows the development of a gentle friendship between Cookie and King-Lu.

Again, First Cow is not for all tastes, and some might find the slow pace downright boring.  But it's such a strange little story,  so unusual and so well-acted and well-produced,  I don't think I'll forget it.  And it's certainly not like anything else out there.

 

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12 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i was just thinking of this movie (the upcoming remake) the other day- wondering where it was going to land in the post COVID SHUFFLE.

DICAPRIO has surprised me with the passage of time.

I'm hard-pressed to think of another performer who has curated a career of such interesting films over the years all while remaining such a fundamentally bad actor.

DiCaprio has since been dropped from the project (or he left he project).  Bradley Cooper will now be playing Stanton Carlisle.  According to Wikipedia, Del Toro's re-adaptation is scheduled for a Dec 3 release.

Lol. I think DiCaprio lucks out in getting good projects.  Maybe he has a really good agent and/or DiCaprio himself is good at reading and choosing scripts.  I actually really liked DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

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44 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I actually really liked DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Agree on both. And I add The Aviator, What's Eating Gilbert Grape, Body of Lies, and Wolf of Wall street. 

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The Train (1964)
 

 

An interesting roundtrip train ride through the picturesque French countryside. An overwhelming number of boche tourists interfere with the serenity.

Burt Lancaster is at his conflicted and adventuresome best. Paul Scofield is ideal as an obsessed foil. Jeanne Moreau carries well as the dour female interest.

This is a John Frankenheimer movie through and through. It carries his distinct cinematography to a pinnacle.

8.1/10

I am sorry to say that this appeared in my lists as a selection that was disappearing from: Amazon Prime Video within hours and so I grabbed the opportunity to watch it. I do not know when or on what other streaming services it might soon appear.

 

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7 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

First Cow

Director: Kelly Reichardt /   Starring  John Magaro  and Orion Lee   

This oddball little thing came out in March 2020. I think the intention was to show it in theatres, but the pandemic hit the very week it was released.  I believe you can stream it off of Hulu or Apple or something.  Maybe even Youtube.

Anyway, I'm not sure if it would have taken off  even if it had done a theatre run.  It is extremely non-commercial,  a very quiet, gentle,  and VERY slow-paced movie.  There's not much action til you're about half an hour into it.  In fact,  there's not much action at all, it's not really what you'd call an action -oriented film.   I kept thinking, "So, where's this cow?"

Oh, not really.  I don't mind this kind of movie, in fact, if it's well-done,  I really like them.  So, what's it about, other than a cow?  Well, it's set in Oregon, sometime in the 19th century  ( I think before the Civil War).  There's a mish-mash of what we now call "settlers",  fur trappers, miners  (I think), Indigenous people, and  immigrants from everywhere.  One of the immigrants,  a Chinese man with impeccable English, King-Lu,   befriends a young man who's made his way from the East  ( Boston, I think). The young Easterner is an excellent cook and baker, in fact,   his name is "Cookie", or so everyone calls him.  The two start hanging out together and talking about various ideas to make a success of their venture into the West .

The richest man in the territory happens to live just a short walk away from Cookie and King-Lu's shack in the Oregon forest,  and he just happens to own the first and only cow in the region.   Cookie and King-Lu conceive the idea of sneaking out at night ,  milking the cow,  and selling the baked treats  Cookie makes from the milk  (mainly "oily cakes", they look like doughnuts, the fritter kind) in the nearby settlement.  

Cookie's biscuits and oily cakes are a huge hit  (you find out he was apprenticed to a baker in Boston,  and learned the trade well.)  He purloins the milk and bakes the treats,  and King-Lu manages the business side of things.  They're doing wonderfully,  literally selling hot cakes, and over a few weeks  (I think it's weeks, the time-line is a little vague), they've made enough money to go to San Francisco and set up a bakery there.  Well, almost enough.  King -Lu wants to sell one more batch of cakes.

In the middle of their plans,  the rich man who owns the cow invites Cookie to bake him a "clafoutis",  a variety of fancy flan , to serve to a visiting guest he wants to show off to.  It is during a scene between the rich man and his guest that we are shown that the man is extremely cruel and heartless.  You realize that if he finds out Cookie and King-Lu are plundering his treasured cow's milk,  it will not go well for them.

The rest of the tale unfolds as one might expect.   Although this is definitely not the kind of movie where you need worry about giving away spoilers,  I'll leave the rest of the plot untold.  In any case,  the fate of Cookie and King-Lu is indicated in the first five minutes of the movie.

I'm afraid I've concentrated too much on the plot here, which is beside the point, since it's not really a very plot-oriented film.  It takes its time, as I said,   it is exceptionally slow-moving,  so if you lose patience with that sort of aesthetic,  First Cow is probably not for you.  What First Cow does well is show us, with I suspect an admirable degree of historical accuracy, what Oregon was like in the early 1800s.  It 's beautifully shot on location in the Oregon wilderness, and it's full of interesting details about how people lived  then,  why they would go to an undeveloped place like that, and what sort of dreams and ambitions people had then. Perhaps most of all it shows the development of a gentle friendship between Cookie and King-Lu.

Again, First Cow is not for all tastes, and some might find the slow pace downright boring.  But it's such a strange little story,  so unusual and so well-acted and well-produced,  I don't think I'll forget it.  And it's certainly not like anything else out there.

 

Maybe this is an overstatement.. ..probably IS; Since Theyve Also Had the occasional Dud, Here and There..

 

 

..but A24's a Veritable Cinema Soaked Miracle...

(Have Zola,. ..Circled on my to-see list for this holiday weekend...

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10 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

First Cow

Director: Kelly Reichardt /   Starring  John Magaro  and Orion Lee   

This oddball little thing came out in March 2020. I think the intention was to show it in theatres, but the pandemic hit the very week it was released.  I believe you can stream it off of Hulu or Apple or something.  Maybe even Youtube.

Anyway, I'm not sure if it would have taken off  even if it had done a theatre run.  It is extremely non-commercial,  a very quiet, gentle,  and VERY slow-paced movie.  There's not much action til you're about half an hour into it.  In fact,  there's not much action at all, it's not really what you'd call an action -oriented film.   I kept thinking, "So, where's this cow?"

Oh, not really.  I don't mind this kind of movie, in fact, if it's well-done,  I really like them.  So, what's it about, other than a cow?  Well, it's set in Oregon, sometime in the 19th century  ( I think before the Civil War).  There's a mish-mash of what we now call "settlers",  fur trappers, miners  (I think), Indigenous people, and  immigrants from everywhere.  One of the immigrants,  a Chinese man with impeccable English, King-Lu,   befriends a young man who's made his way from the East  ( Boston, I think). The young Easterner is an excellent cook and baker, in fact,   his name is "Cookie", or so everyone calls him.  The two start hanging out together and talking about various ideas to make a success of their venture into the West .

The richest man in the territory happens to live just a short walk away from Cookie and King-Lu's shack in the Oregon forest,  and he just happens to own the first and only cow in the region.   Cookie and King-Lu conceive the idea of sneaking out at night ,  milking the cow,  and selling the baked treats  Cookie makes from the milk  (mainly "oily cakes", they look like doughnuts, the fritter kind) in the nearby settlement.  

Cookie's biscuits and oily cakes are a huge hit  (you find out he was apprenticed to a baker in Boston,  and learned the trade well.)  He purloins the milk and bakes the treats,  and King-Lu manages the business side of things.  They're doing wonderfully,  literally selling hot cakes, and over a few weeks  (I think it's weeks, the time-line is a little vague), they've made enough money to go to San Francisco and set up a bakery there.  Well, almost enough.  King -Lu wants to sell one more batch of cakes.

In the middle of their plans,  the rich man who owns the cow invites Cookie to bake him a "clafoutis",  a variety of fancy flan , to serve to a visiting guest he wants to show off to.  It is during a scene between the rich man and his guest that we are shown that the man is extremely cruel and heartless.  You realize that if he finds out Cookie and King-Lu are plundering his treasured cow's milk,  it will not go well for them.

The rest of the tale unfolds as one might expect.   Although this is definitely not the kind of movie where you need worry about giving away spoilers,  I'll leave the rest of the plot untold.  In any case,  the fate of Cookie and King-Lu is indicated in the first five minutes of the movie.

I'm afraid I've concentrated too much on the plot here, which is beside the point, since it's not really a very plot-oriented film.  It takes its time, as I said,   it is exceptionally slow-moving,  so if you lose patience with that sort of aesthetic,  First Cow is probably not for you.  What First Cow does well is show us, with I suspect an admirable degree of historical accuracy, what Oregon was like in the early 1800s.  It 's beautifully shot on location in the Oregon wilderness, and it's full of interesting details about how people lived  then,  why they would go to an undeveloped place like that, and what sort of dreams and ambitions people had then. Perhaps most of all it shows the development of a gentle friendship between Cookie and King-Lu.

Again, First Cow is not for all tastes, and some might find the slow pace downright boring.  But it's such a strange little story,  so unusual and so well-acted and well-produced,  I don't think I'll forget it.  And it's certainly not like anything else out there.

 

This was the last movie (along with Emma.) that I saw before the pandemic shutdowns. It is a modern revisionist Western; as such it drastically cuts back on action in order to try to show everyday life on the frontier.

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11 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

DiCaprio has since been dropped from the project (or he left he project).  Bradley Cooper will now be playing Stanton Carlisle.  According to Wikipedia, Del Toro's re-adaptation is scheduled for a Dec 3 release.

Lol. I think DiCaprio lucks out in getting good projects.  Maybe he has a really good agent and/or DiCaprio himself is good at reading and choosing scripts.  I actually really liked DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

HA!

Shows you how well I keep up with the modern movies.

I suppose you could say of me, it is admirable how I write so many reviews after all this time while still  consistently getting my facts wrong!\

(I've gotten too lazy to google.)

ps- thanks for the correction!

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The Buster Keaton Story Poster

The Buster Keaton Story (1957) Youtube 4/10

A biography of the famous silent screen comedian.

This was an often deadly dull fictionalized film of a comedy legend. Donald O'Connor plays the title role. It only comes to life in a few recreations of some of his routines. O'Connor's physical prowess helps in these scenes and  they are pretty funny. "Guest Star" Rhonda Fleming plays a diva movie star who leads Buster on. Ann Blyth is a casting director who becomes his wife. The real reason I wanted to see it was for Peter Lorre, it is one of the few films of his I had not yet seen. But that was a disappointment as well, he plays a film director and barely has 10 minutes of screen time. He gives a very listless performance, so it is obvious he was bored with the role.

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Speaking of Leo, Quentin T. has made a pulp novel based upon Once Upon.  Does anyone here (stupid question -- I'm sure a lot of people do) remember Sam Peckinpah?  Long before Quentin and his affinity for gore (Kill Bill movies were extremely gory), there was S.P. (e.g. The Wild Bunch and did he do the original Straw Dogs (gave me nightmares).

Last night, I watched A Place in the Sun and listened to what Dave K. and Andrew McCarthy (he was the guest programmer) had to say about it.  I read the book and Shelley Winters' performance was fantastic.  Liz Taylor was fine (she has been better in other films); Montgomery C.  did an excellent job (as he did in From Here to Eternity).  M.C. lost his good looks after a horrible accident.  After the accident, he acted in Judgment at Nuremburg and The Misfits (the last completed film for Gable, Clift and Marilyn?).  I wonder if having to stay closeted lead to his drug and alcohol abuse.    As for Liz, she was much more tolerable than the character in the book (who used baby talk when talking to adults).  The other two films I've seen before (i.e., the ones chosen by Andrew M.:  The Philadelphia Story and East of Eden.  He praised Jimmy Stewart while I prefer Cary Grant.

 

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On 6/26/2021 at 7:15 AM, TikiSoo said:

Ok, I've kept quiet for 4 pages worth of SNL trashing. I was prime age (18) when SNL started and  always rushed home from a night out to catch it. Of course it was revolutionary sketch comedy in the first few seasons, but when revisiting the "golden years" doesn't hold up well for me. I have been pleasantly surprised in the past few years at how much I have enjoyed both the writing & cast. I love Baldwin's Drumpf and think it was brilliant. Many sketches have me laughing out loud & I find the present cast excellent.

Drumpf is a big crybaby & needs to grow up & realize: elect a clown, expect a circus.

But obviously we are different camps, possibly a generational thing as I would never watch a show called FEAR THY NEIGHBOR - just tawdry. Knowing that "true life reality" shows can so easily skew perspectives, I don't waste a moment's consideration. Remember-I was approached with an offer to "star" in one a few years ago.

But I am glad all of you voiced your opinions, otherwise I'd never know there's people out there who feel that way. Reading your opinions really helps broaden my own view of what's popular/not popular & why. I'm going to chalk up our differences to being an old lady hippie.

beautiful-senior-boho-stylish-woman-pict

Drumpf?  Is this a politics thread?

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Buster Keaton Story Poster

The Buster Keaton Story (1957) Youtube 4/10

A biography of the famous silent screen comedian.

This was an often deadly dull fictionalized film of a comedy legend. Donald O'Connor plays the title role. It only comes to life in a few recreations of some of his routines. O'Connor's physical prowess helps in these scenes and  they are pretty funny. "Guest Star" Rhonda Fleming plays a diva movie star who leads Buster on. Ann Blyth is a casting director who becomes his wife. The real reason I wanted to see it was for Peter Lorre, it is one of the few films of his I had not yet seen. But that was a disappointment as well, he plays a film director and barely has 10 minutes of screen time. He gives a very listless performance, so it is obvious he was bored with the role.

Huge Keaton fan but I haven't bothered with this as I've read it isn't an accurate story on Keaton's life but just something he sold the rights to in order to get money.  Is there any reason you see in a Keaton fan watching this?

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On 6/25/2021 at 2:44 PM, EricJ said:

Christmas was originally going to be "Ski Vacation" when it was first announced, but long comic highlights of Clark careening downhill were reduced to just one scene in the movie.

By that point in the 80's, though, we were already drowning in bad drive-in ski-lodge comedies.

I never knew that before about Ski Vacation.  I do know that Chase and Eric Idle wrote a script for an Australian Vacation that never went anywhere.  I know he get a lot os sh** these days, but I'm a Chase fan.

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A Raisin in the Sun (1961)  From my long-time film queue.   Thought it was based off a Tennessee Williams play at first with all of the shouting, so I was surprised it wasn't.  I liked the film and thought it was a damn good performance by Poitier and Claudia McNeil.  I see that Louis Gossett Jr. is in it, but I didn't recognize him in the film.

The 47 Ronin Pt.1 (1941)  Kind of boring which I know some samurai films can be (couldn't bear Kagemusha) .  Hoping there's some action in the second part.

Palm Springs (2020) Basically a Groundhog Day knock-off.  If you like Andy Samberg you'll probably like this film but personally I'd skip.

The Long, Long Trailer (1954) Loved it.  Will watch this again.

The Out of Towners (1970) Probably my least favorite Neil Simon film that I've seen, but it was still fun to watch.

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On 6/29/2021 at 11:00 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

(whom he is denigrating by not allowing her to be called the Mayor-elect). 

She's not the Mayor-elect, since she hasn't won the general election.

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9 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

This was the last movie (along with Emma.) that I saw before the pandemic shutdowns. It is a modern revisionist Western; as such it drastically cuts back on action in order to try to show everyday life on the frontier.

I'm glad you got to see  First Cow, Polly, and in an actual cinema, at that.  I think it's one of those films that is best viewed on the big screen,  the cinematography is so important, due to all those long shots of the Oregon wilderness, plus there are so many scenes shot at night.  

I do want to clarify something:  I don't mind  "slow-paced" films at all, some of my favourite movies are very slow,  and have very little  "action".  And it's part of the charm and beauty of First Cow that it does take its time to unfold.  There are so many things to observe along the way,  the quiet tenor of the film is well-suited to both its mood and its look .

I may have put undue emphasis on the "slow" nature of First Cow ,   and the lack of action as  most people understand the word when applied to movies.  This was only because I imagined, fairly or unfairly, that a lot of posters would find the film difficult to focus on because it takes its time so much.  I was thinking of them, not really speaking from my own point of view. I realize now this was an injustice to the people who read these forums,  most of whom, I'm sure,  can appreciate slow-paced films.

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1 hour ago, Shank Asu said:

Huge Keaton fan but I haven't bothered with this as I've read it isn't an accurate story on Keaton's life but just something he sold the rights to in order to get money.  Is there any reason you see in a Keaton fan watching this?

Even Buster Keaton was still alive at the time to claim it was a crock, but that he needed a few house payments.  
As for "worth it", it basically concentrates on his drinking, invents some Hollywood-sanitized spending and philandering, and mostly serves to remind people in the 50's that Silent Movies existed, as everyone had pretty much forgotten by then, and it was cute to do imitations.

A more accurate fall-and-rise-of-Buster Keaton roman a clef would be Dick Van Dyke in Carl Reiner's The Comic (1969), although Van Dyke thought he was doing his favorite Stan Laurel impersonation.

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5 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Buster Keaton Story Poster

The Buster Keaton Story (1957) Youtube 4/10

A biography of the famous silent screen comedian.

This was an often deadly dull fictionalized film of a comedy legend. Donald O'Connor plays the title role. It only comes to life in a few recreations of some of his routines. O'Connor's physical prowess helps in these scenes and  they are pretty funny. "Guest Star" Rhonda Fleming plays a diva movie star who leads Buster on. Ann Blyth is a casting director who becomes his wife. The real reason I wanted to see it was for Peter Lorre, it is one of the few films of his I had not yet seen. But that was a disappointment as well, he plays a film director and barely has 10 minutes of screen time. He gives a very listless performance, so it is obvious he was bored with the role.

Wasn't Keaton married to one of the Talmadge sisters? I don't think she was a casting director.....

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28 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

My two cents:

If the word “Cow” is in the title, chances are the audience isn’t expecting something with breakneck pacing. 

What about Apocalypse Cow ?

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