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10 hours ago, SansFin said:

The Killing (1956)

 

An ex-convict plans a perfect robbery. 

 I find the title inappropriate because it is not an assassination and no person was to be killed during the robbery. 

 

But SansFin,  as you are an intelligent and well-informed person, and I'm sure aware of American vernacular in the 1950s,  I am surprised that you wouldn't have known that the term  "killing"  back then had another meaning  (as opposed to the taking of a life), viz.,   getting a lot of money.  Although often used in a criminal context  ( as in the Stanley Kubrick film),  it was also spoken to refer to bringing in a load of cash, as in    " The ice cream vendor sold a special  version of strawberry ice cream that day at the fair, it was so popular, he made a killing."   

I suspect you're already aware of this and are messing with us.   B)

So, while yes,  Sterling and his gang are planning to commit a crime,  they have no intention or desire to kill anyone   (except a horse -- NOT a cow !  )  and they do expect to get away with a huge amount of cash from their endeavour--in other words,  they hope to make a killing from their heist.

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10 hours ago, SansFin said:

I can never truly associate the title with the action

After killing a horse, they hope to make a killing monetarily.

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If it means anything to anyone, the novel on which the film THE KILLING is based is called CLEAN BREAK, And I actually kind a like that title better. But at the same time, I also prefer the book to the movie or at least I did when I read it a long long time ago.

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12 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I love this movie though. I enjoyed the way the heist was set-up and the eventual execution. Elisha Cook Jr and Marie Windsor were fantastic, as was Sterling Hayden. I enjoyed the non-linear narrative. I know Stanley Kubrick didn’t like the narration, but I liked it. It helped me keep the events of the movie straight in my mind. 

Apart from the cynicism of the robbery being upended by greedy members out for themselves, I watched the first half thinking, it doesn't FEEL like a sardonic, emotionally-removed later-Kubrick film.   And then, in the second half,  where little real-world things start going wrong with the perfect on-paper plan...  😅

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

If it means anything to anyone, the novel on which the film THE KILLING is based is called CLEAN BREAK, And I actually kind a like that title better. But at the same time, I also prefer the book to the movie or at least I did when I read it a long long time ago.

And here I always thought an even better title for this movie (and maybe the book) would have been, How Not To Pack Your Checked Baggage !

(...of course and then again, having been an airline baggage handled myself at one time, I would probably think so, huh)

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15 hours ago, Dargo said:

And here I always thought an even better title for this movie (and maybe the book) would have been, How Not To Pack Your Checked Baggage !

(...of course and then again, having been an airline baggage handled myself at one time, I would probably think so, huh)

That reminds me of the time I was with a friend who saw a ten dollar bill blowing across a plaza parking lot. She was after it faster than a jet. Car wheels were squealing to a halt as she pursued that bill, impervious to all physical harm that could occur from a mere encounter with a chrome and steel vehicle moving twenty miles an hour her way. She came back smiling with the bill clutched in her happy fingers. I was shaking my head but figured she had earned it. Other people standing nearby were laughing.

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

And here I always thought an even better title for this movie (and maybe the book) would have been, How Not To Pack Your Checked Baggage !

(...of course and then again, having been an airline baggage handled myself at one time, I would probably think so, huh)

I hate hate HATE that ending!!!!

It’s like having THE ASPHALT JUNGLE end with an appearance by “The Three Stooges.“

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5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

[...] I am surprised that you wouldn't have known that the term  "killing"  back then had another meaning  (as opposed to the taking of a life), viz.,   getting a lot of money.  Although often used in a criminal context  ( as in the Stanley Kubrick film),  it was also spoken to refer to bringing in a load of cash, as in    " The ice cream vendor sold a special  version of strawberry ice cream that day at the fair, it was so popular, he made a killing."   

 

I thank you for your kind words.

I know intellectually that the word is used in that context. I do not know it instinctually. I mean by this that I it would come into my mind if I wished to express an exceptionally large return on an investment but I can not come to it when thinking of the keywords: "heist" or "robbery" or "caper". 

My only recourse is to search for the stars. I remember well: Sterling Hayden. I am at a loss to remember the name of the little guy so I must search through Humphrey Bogart movies because I knew they appeared together in two movies. I am at a loss also to remember the name of the amoral flouncey vixen and so must search the credits of: The Thin Man series of movies because I know that she appeared in one of those. The same is true with other members of the cast. It is only when I have found a second name can I pair it with: Sterling Hayden to pinpoint the movie. 

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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I hate hate HATE that ending!!!!

It’s like having THE ASPHALT JUNGLE end with an appearance by “The Three Stooges.“

Sounds like heaven to me.

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

And here I always thought an even better title for this movie (and maybe the book) would have been, How Not To Pack Your Checked Baggage !

(...of course and then again, having been an airline baggage handled myself at one time, I would probably think so, huh)

You might reflect on how it is a blessing that you left the industry when you did. It seems now to be a common complaint that passengers do not remove the batteries from their sex toys before checking their baggage and the jostling of it results in it being activated. The noise and vibration must then be investigated as a possible bomb. 

I must wonder how many of those incidents you would have to handle before you could no longer maintain a professional façade while telling a passenger that their **** triggered a partial shut-down of the airport and delayed a dozen or more flights. 

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31 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I hate hate HATE that ending!!!!

It’s like having THE ASPHALT JUNGLE end with an appearance by “The Three Stooges.“

I simply took it to mean that he was ill-fated from the beginning. 

It is much like when you fall to your knees and look up into the sky and say: "Why me, Lord?" and the clouds part and a thunderous voice replies: "Some people just pi.ss me off."

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Minions (2015)
 

 

A tribe of little yellow mutants seek to serve the world's greatest evil villains but inadvertently destroy every master they find.

This is a prequel to: Despicable Me (2010) and shows the minions being lovable little screw-ups since the dawn of time.

I seriously doubt that any child would understand the references which make this movie so splendidly funny. 

7.8/10

I watched this as part of a project to ensure that birthday gifts for my little fuzzy's granddaughters are appropriate and suitable. We purchased the DVD for five dollars from: Amazon but I saw it in the five-dollar-bin at Wal-Mart the same day that it arrived.

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23 minutes ago, SansFin said:

I simply took it to mean that he was ill-fated from the beginning. 

The entire robbery, perfect on paper, was spoiled by the real world, that was the point--

Like the sniper being annoyed by that helpful parking-lot attendant--and getting a blowout on that "lucky" horseshoe--long before Sterling's airport escape was being spoiled by customers in the ticket line.

Quote

It is much like when you fall to your knees and look up into the sky and say: "Why me, Lord?" and the clouds part and a thunderous voice replies: "Some people just pi.ss me off."

Charlie Brown:  "Some nights I lie awake in bed and ask 'Why me?'...And then I seem to hear a voice saying 'Nothing personal, kid, your name just came up.'"

- Charles M. Schulz

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

Apart from the cynicism of the robbery being upended by greedy members out for themselves, I watched the first half thinking, it doesn't FEEL like a sardonic, emotionally-removed later-Kubrick film.   And then, in the second half,  where little real-world things start going wrong with the perfect on-paper plan...  😅

I thought that The Killing was the perfect example of the idea that you could meticulously plan plan plan for something (e.g. a heist), but you can never account for people. 

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3 hours ago, Dargo said:

And here I always thought an even better title for this movie (and maybe the book) would have been, How Not To Pack Your Checked Baggage !

(...of course and then again, having been an airline baggage handled myself at one time, I would probably think so, huh)

I love The Killing, but when Sterling Hayden puts the money in the suitcase, I'm always yelling at him: Don't take the money out of the bag! Just put the bag in the suitcase!  Alas, he never listens to me. 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I hate hate HATE that ending!!!!

It’s like having THE ASPHALT JUNGLE end with an appearance by “The Three Stooges.“

The ending is similar to that of Treasure of Sierra Madre,  which I'm assuming you're familiar with.

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I love The Killing, but when Sterling Hayden puts the money in the suitcase, I'm always yelling at him: Don't take the money out of the bag! Just put the bag in the suitcase!  Alas, he never listens to me. 

What I noticed during this watching is that the money was mostly in stacked bundles when it was put into the sack but was all loose when he put it into the suitcase.

I am sorry to say that I am one of those people also who are affected by apparent discrepancies. Both the bag and the suitcase seem to weigh less than fifty pounds. This is based on their swing patterns and the ease with which they are picked up and are carried. Two million dollars in fifty pounds requires an average bill to be eighty-eight dollars. This suggests a mix of only fifty and one-hundred dollar bills with slight emphasis on the latter. A racetrack with that volume of high-value bills would need forklift access to their money room to accommodate the handling of pallet-loads of ones, fives and tens. 

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20 minutes ago, SansFin said:

What I noticed during this watching is that the money was mostly in stacked bundles when it was put into the sack but was all loose when he put it into the suitcase.

I am sorry to say that I am one of those people also who are affected by apparent discrepancies. Both the bag and the suitcase seem to weigh less than fifty pounds. This is based on their swing patterns and the ease with which they are picked up and are carried. Two million dollars in fifty pounds requires an average bill to be eighty-eight dollars. This suggests a mix of only fifty and one-hundred dollar bills with slight emphasis on the latter. A racetrack with that volume of high-value bills would need forklift access to their money room to accommodate the handling of pallet-loads of ones, fives and tens. 

Yes. Sterling Hayden didn't seem to need to pay extra for going over the weight limit when he was forced to check his bag.  I would have never thought about the weight of the money, but that's an interesting detail.

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Speaking of "weight of the money" . . . you just have to overlook some things like that in films and television to glean more enjoyment from it.  →  Like the weight of gold in KELLY'S HEROES when Kelly & Co. pack it on the pick-up truck and the end and the '64 Bond movie "GOLDFINGER".  I just do the "suspend my disbelief" thing and take it as "this movie I'm watching takes place in a slightly altered Universe where gold doesn't weigh as much as it does in Real Life".  :) 

It's similar to watching MANNIX and CANNON on MeTv late at night.  Joe Mannix gets beat up and/or shot at in every episode, it seems, and there's no way a single human being could withstand that kind of physical punishment without being in a nursing home and fed through a straw.  Or dead already.   Goes for William Conrad as overweight detective Frank Cannon.  He gets beat up an awful lot + he gets poisoned with fatal stuff at least once (see the 1975 CANNON episode "A Touch of Venom"). 

It's not the same with "Barnaby Jones" because he's already 65 years old when the series starts so he can't get beat up like MANNIX or CANNON cos he'd be dead.    

 

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5 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

a slightly altered Universe where gold doesn't weigh as much as it does in Real Life

Gold doesn't always weigh 50+ lbs. I keep thousands of dollars of gold in my toolbox that weighs practically nothing. Gold leaf comes as fine as a human hair.

A book of 25 3x3" sheets costs about $300 (tripled in the last decade) with the tissue paper's weight exceeding the gold's weight. Even large amounts are super easy to steal & hide anywhere undetected.

I always wondered why anyone would bother stealing heavy solid gold bars when gold leaf is so much easier to hide & distribute. No, you don't get a million dollars, but you also don't get caught so easily. Blind greed.

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Crimeschool.jpg

Crime School (1938) TCM On Demand-6/10

A newly appointed deputy commissioner of corrections (Humphrey Bogart) tries to help out some slum kids (The Dead End Kids) sent to reform school.

A Dead End Kids film that came in between the excellent Dead End and Angels With Dirty Faces. It's not as good as those but still worth seeing. It starts out pretty tough and gritty but has a bit of a pat and comical ending. It's a treat seeing Bogart on the right side of the law for a change. The early scenes in the reform school are quite brutal. The Kids are still in their early stages, keeping to their usual characters-BIlly Halop is once again the leader and main character, Leo Gorcey plays the loose cannon who gets in the most trouble, Huntz Hall is again the comic relief (his character is named Goofy). I liked them this way before they became a comedy team as The East Side Kids and Bowery Boys.

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14 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

The ending is similar to that of Treasure of Sierra Madre,  which I'm assuming you're familiar with.

I’ve never thought of that. But yeah, I see it. 
 

However, I highly recommend to you or anyone who is interested in great works of American pulp fiction checking out the novel CLEAN BREAK by LIONEL WHITE, Certain editions have been re-titled as THE KILLING To capitalize on the fact that it is the source novel. I read it about 25 years ago and I remember absolutely loving it, although it is very very different from the movie especially the ending which is 100 times better. 
 

There’s absolutely nothing at all redeeming about anybody in the novel, no glimpses of humanity to be found at all. And the Marie Windsor character is even more evil.

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11 hours ago, SansFin said:

Two million dollars in fifty pounds requires an average bill to be eighty-eight dollars.

Or 44 lbs in hundreds that would fit in two standard briefcases. Which means it's possible and that's the important part. We aren't required to completely ignore math basics to accept the concept.

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