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A Place in the Sun (1951) 
I had a fairly good time with this drama; I understand the times in which it was produced and released, but I wish they had gone a little deeper with some of the plot-lines. All in all, a decent watch; I am quickly regaining my love for Elizabeth Taylor. 

 

Harvey (1950) 
Jimmy Stewart is one of the most charismatic and charming people who have ever graced the screen (in my opinion), and this was certainly no exception. There were parts of this that genuinely made me laugh out loud; Jesse White as the male orderly as the hospital, really stood out to me. His jokes were solid and his delivery was great. I believe this is the only thing I've seen Peggy Dow in.... and also who could forget Josephine Hull (of Arsenic and Old Lace fame). She was consistently funny in this as well. 

 

The Lady Eve (1941) 
Barbara Stanwyck is another actress who is quickly rising in my estimations; I love her in screwball/comedic roles as she seems to excel in this particular genre. Henry Fonda was cute, but I was very pleased with Stanwyck's performance in this. 

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11 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

A Place in the Sun (1951) 
I had a fairly good time with this drama; I understand the times in which it was produced and released, but I wish they had gone a little deeper with some of the plot-lines. All in all, a decent watch; I am quickly regaining my love for Elizabeth Taylor. 

 

Not too long before she died, ELIZABETH TAYLOR completely disparaged her acting career (which, I guess was her right) saying she was only good in parts of VIRGINIA WOOLFE and that's it.

This made me a little mad, honestly, because she was a tremendous actress- yes, in many senses of the word- and even when she or the movie (or both) are TERRIBLE, you cannot help BUT WATCH. [see BOOM! NO REALLY, GO NOW AND WATCH IT]

She is magic in A PLACE IN THE SUN, quite frankly, the only damn thing in the entire film that I like- it's a very screwed-up film, one that I kinda think of as a 1950s, ALL-AMERICAN version of TRIUMPH OF THE WILL.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I've been watching episodes of MAUDE on youtube and that show is hilarious!

A great show. They had some big stars as guests on it.  Such as John Wayne, he and Maude are opposite politically but Maude is too star struck to argue. In another episode, Maude wants Henry Fonda to run for president, but he refuses. "Jimmy Stewart put you up to this, didn't he?" he tells her.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

She is magic in A PLACE IN THE SUN, quite frankly, the only damn thing in the entire film that I like- it's a very screwed-up film,

It's some of her best work and probably is Montgomery Clift's best. The whole cautionary tale of what can happen from the classes mingling. 

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51 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

A great show. They had some big stars as guests on it.  Such as John Wayne, he and Maude are opposite politically but Maude is too star struck to argue. In another episode, Maude wants Henry Fonda to run for president, but he refuses. "Jimmy Stewart put you up to this, didn't he?" he tells her.

My favorite episode!

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Not too long before she died, ELIZABETH TAYLOR completely disparaged her acting career (which, I guess was her right) saying she was only good in parts of VIRGINIA WOOLFE and that's it.

This made me a little mad, honestly, because she was a tremendous actress- yes, in many senses of the word- and even when she or the movie (or both) are TERRIBLE, you cannot help BUT WATCH. [see BOOM! NO REALLY, GO NOW AND WATCH IT]

She is magic in A PLACE IN THE SUN, quite frankly, the only damn thing in the entire film that I like- it's a very screwed-up film, one that I kinda think of as a 1950s, ALL-AMERICAN version of TRIUMPH OF THE WILL.

I wish I could see BOOM! again! (I think the ex. point was in the title. LOL) It's never on tv! :(

I wish TCM would schedule a Liz and Dick turkey night. They did so many in the 60s/70s. (together and alone). I hadn't heard this about Liz. Was this on a talk show? I know she never thought she was a great actress, but everything?

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I've been watching episodes of MAUDE on youtube and that show is hilarious!

 

I thought the show lost something when Florida left. Never liked her replacement. The political stuff got old after awhile.

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Liz also reteamed with Monty Clift (and she was supposedly very protective or her gay friends, especially during the time of AiDS) in Suddenly Last Summer.  Her recounting of what happened to Sebastian is harrowing (and, though not graphic, gave me nightmares just imagining it).  She held her own with Hepburn.

I wish TCM could get The Lucy Show episode where she put on that humongous ring Burton gave her.  They were a perfect example of couples who love each other but our volatile when put together (both had addiction problems).  Poor Liz made several bad choices, especially that motorcycle? dude, Larry Fortensky.

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Maude was the typical example of Norman Lear's audacity (which, in many ways was a good thing).  He broached topics, such as Maude getting an abortion and Edith going through menopause that other series wouldn't touch.  One of my favorite All in the Family episodes is when the original Lionel (Mike Evans?) told Meathead (Rob Reiner) that he was a reverse racist.  He was the typical example of a white liberal thinking that a black man needed his help in order to achieve everything Civil Rights promised.  So relevant today. 

Maude co-stars Bea and Rue went on to star in The Golden Girls (don't understand why it is considered a favorite among gay individuals - sounds like stereotyping).

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10 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Liz also reteamed with Monty Clift (and she was supposedly very protective or her gay friends, especially during the time of AiDS) in Suddenly Last Summer.  Her recounting of what happened to Sebastian is harrowing (and, though not graphic, gave me nightmares just imagining it).  She held her own with Hepburn.

I wish TCM could get The Lucy Show episode where she put on that humongous ring Burton gave her.  They were a perfect example of couples who love each other but our volatile when put together (both had addiction problems).  Poor Liz made several bad choices, especially that motorcycle? dude, Larry Fortensky.

One of her best performances imo. Clift and Liz were supposed to co-star in Reflections In A Golden Eye (and Liz put up her salary to insure him) but he died before filming began and Brando replaced him.

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12 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Liz also reteamed with Monty Clift (and she was supposedly very protective or her gay friends, especially during the time of AiDS) in Suddenly Last Summer.  Her recounting of what happened to Sebastian is harrowing (and, though not graphic, gave me nightmares just imagining it).  She held her own with Hepburn.

I wish TCM could get The Lucy Show episode where she put on that humongous ring Burton gave her.  They were a perfect example of couples who love each other but our volatile when put together (both had addiction problems).  Poor Liz made several bad choices, especially that motorcycle? dude, Larry Fortensky.

I never saw that Lucy episode. Would love to see it.

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Liz was pretty funny in the Lucy episode.  She showed a sense of humor you usually don't see in her films.

In the documentary  "England's Other Elizabeth" she is quite engaging and often amusing during interviews. 

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7 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

That's what Liz said, I still remember reading it and being taken aback.

Wow.

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On 7/7/2021 at 4:41 AM, TikiSoo said:

A fellow forumer had suggested a book THE MAKING OF THE SEARCHERS so I read that first.

Could you double check that title. There's a couple of books I'm finding. One from 2004 The Searchers: Essays and Reflections on John Ford’s Classic Western 

and the one I suspect you might be talking about The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend. Both look interesting.

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19 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Wow.

AT THAT TIME IN HER LIFE THOUGH, LIZ had been through, Hell, what? EIGHT MARRIAGES, legally died once,  had multiple stays in REHAB, several new faces, and had God only knows HOW MANY mind-altering substances pumped into her both willingly and not

so...you know, grain of salt with WHATEVER she was saying.

 

ps- this was also YEARS after the whole "GLAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAADIATOR!" incident at THE GOLDEN GLOBES, so use that as a point of reference as well.

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In that documentary Liz discusses how much she hated rehearsals.  She says she had to "save it all up" for when the cameras were really rolling. 

During Cat rehearsals she recalls Paul Newman went to Richard Brooks and asked "Is that it?  Is that all Lizard is going to do?"

He was told....just wait.

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Just now, Mr. Gorman said:

Remember the 1972 film HAMMERSMITH IS OUT with Liz, Dick and Beau Bridges?   I wonder if TCM has ever aired it? 

 

X, Y, AND ZEE is one I am *sorta* curious about.

but they don't tend to show many of LIZ's post VIRGINIA WOLFE films besides maybe NIGHT WATCH (which I can only remember airing a couple of times)

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37 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Could you double check that title. There's a couple of books I'm finding. One from 2004 The Searchers: Essays and Reflections on John Ford’s Classic Western 

and the one I suspect you might be talking about The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend. Both look interesting.

The second book is outstanding, and I found Frankel's discussion of the history behind the incidents in the film as fascinating as his discussion of the film itself.

 

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On 7/7/2021 at 7:41 AM, TikiSoo said:

These are both great films if you love the JD genre. I find it interesting that kids were expected to behave within an adult world until after WW2 and then  progressively less mature as the decades have passed. Now, the bar is so low we don't even expect adults to "grow up" by their 20's.

I just finished watching THE SEARCHERS '56. I had several great prejudices about this film and had no desire to ever see it: I dislike John Ford as director, dislike John Wayne as an actor, can't handle violence/horse crashes, find movies about "savage Indians" racist.

A fellow forumer had suggested a book THE MAKING OF THE SEARCHERS so I read that first. Great book & it was perfect to set me up to watch the movie. I viewed all Amerindians as peaceful naturalists, since I live within Iroquois territory. Apparently, the Comanches of the West were a wholly different tribe- very violent. The book also told of the original real story The Searchers was based upon, very much clearing up some of the plot "holes" like why the Comanche Chief  Scar,  had blue eyes.

Everyone else knows this movie, so I'll only mention my impressions which vary widely from love to hate.

I absolutely LOVED the photography. The entire setting of Monument Valley was spectacular & the settler's ranches looked lonely & isolated. The opening shot of the Monuments seen through the cottage door opening and the matching end shot of Wayne walking out the door to the Monuments was beautiful. I loved the several scenes of riding through the wilderness, river, snow were all immense & gorgeous. Interior cottage scenes filmed in a studio worked fine,  but all outdoor scenes shot on the soundstage took you right out of the story.

I absolutely HATED the incidental "comedy" bits thrown in, almost all misogynistic. The man thought he was buying a blanket that really bought a "squaw"? Pretty similarly offensive as in CALL OF THE WILD.  Poor woman was treated like an idiot/slave/object.

I do think comedy could help the gravity of the story, but could have been more subtle...like personality flaws that make the charactor more well rounded, less one note. Ford more often chose more physical & insulting type comedy. The feelings between Ethan & his sister-in-law were subtly depicted.

Thankfully, not much gore was shown, although they hammer in the point that once a woman has s e x with an Indian, she might as well be dead. The scenes of the "recovered captive women" as babbling idiots almost resulted in throwing an entire bowl of popcorn at the screen. But, knowing this Settler's sentiment made Ethan's final acceptance of the rescued Debbie all the more touching. When Ethan  swept her up in his arms & said, "Let's go home, Debbie" I cried like a baby. I'm tearing up just writing it.

On an emotional level obviously the movie works. I hope someday to see it on the big screen. And boy, do I want to go horseback riding in Monument Valley.

392px-SearchersPoster-BillGold.jpg

Terrific discussion of this film.  I, too, read Frankel's books, actually on a trip to Monument Valley, which I had never visited.  The film evokes the same ambivalent response in me, and I must admit, visiting the Valley,   I felt somewhat awash in the emotions of the film.  It is truly one of the most stark and beautiful places in the U.S.

 

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@LORNA:  I've seen X, Y and ZEE multiple times.  Years ago I bought the Columbia VHS release of "X,Y and Zee" -- back in the mid-1990s, I should say -- and I rather enjoyed it or I'd only have watched it once.  A British soap opera of sorts.  Michael Caine plays an architect.  Liz is his wife.  Susannah becomes his mistress.  And a crazy time is had by all.  Also a groovy theme song by Three Dog Night called "Running In Circles" or some such.  (This song may have been eliminated from the DVD release due to music rights issues, but it's on the Columbia tape).   

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THE SOPRANOS

Of course I've  heard a lot about this   - dare I say "iconic"? - television series,  one of the first of that kind of  movie-quality tv shows  (along with "The Wire" and "Mad Men"). I'd always been a bit curious to see it,  but never really sought it out. Recently someone lent me their DVD set of the entire series, complete with an entire book and lots of fancy accessories.  I only mention this to explain why I finally started watching it.

Anyway,  I have watched 4 episodes from season one so far.  I'm not sure if I want to continue.  There's no question it's a great show,  really high quality in every way - production standards,  acting,  attention to detail, soundtrack,  characterizations,  etc.   But I'm not sure I can take all the violence !   Now, usually I can handle violence, including the exceptionally nasty kind of violence peculiar to gangster stories.  But that's because I normally see this in a movie.  Goodfellas is filled with horrific violence, but aside from the fact that it's a great film,  it's  just shy of 2 1/2 hours long.  When that 2 1/2 hours is over, the film is over,  and I'm released from watching any more face-covering-worthy violence.

But The Sopranos  is 6 seasons long,  and each episode is about an hour long, and each episode contains at least one scene of gut-wrenching (literally ) violence.  At least so far,  there may be episodes that contain none,  but somehow I doubt it.

So I'm trying to decide whether to continue with it, or bail out while I'm still only at season one.  I just don't  know if I can take watching an hour of this every night  (ok, nobody says I have to watch it every night, but at least,  on an ongoing basis for quite a while....)

Has anybody else watched The Sopranos all the way through,  and if so,  would they recommend that I stick with it?   (and yes,  I have heard about the totally unexpected and possibly dissatisfying ending.  )

 

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24 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Has anybody else watched The Sopranos all the way through

Multiple times. Season two is the best, the first episode being an especially great episode. It's starts to go from great to good by five but by then you're committed. Thing to do is watch season one episode one after you get to the end. The transformation of the characters is amazing.

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