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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Are they in the same cemeteries? Where was Garland moved to?

Garland & Lorne (& Cab Calloway, Ed Sullivan & many others) were/are in Ferncliff in the Hudson Valley, just north of NYC. It must have been farmland back then, the country. Garland was recently moved by her children to Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Also had the great Reta Shaw for a few episodes.

The show won a Peabody award in its first season.   It was originally just a summer replacement series (remember those?)

I adore Reta Shaw, my Mother would be horrified to know it's because she reminds me of her! MrPeepers was before my time too, but like The Betty White Show, I'm aware of it. I definitely am familiar with Wally Cox's schtick.

Haha, replacement series.

One of the things I lament about our a la carte TV viewing is that there was something wonderful knowing a million other people around the country were seeing & experiencing the same thing you were. It was second only to the theater experience - I am SO LOOKING FORWARD to seeing a movie in a theater with hundreds of others!

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Wally Cox was on Hollywood Squares.  I was too young for Mr. Peepers (before my time and don't remember seeing repeats, like I Love Lucy).  Paul Lynde (Uncle Arthur on Bewitched and the father in Bye Bye Birdie) was hilarious in the center square.  Charlie Weaver AKA Cliff Arquette.  Great show to see some old-time veterans.

Last night, until it got to the ridiculous ending, I watched The Witches of Eastwick.  I don't know whose idea it was to tamper with the plot.  In the movie, they are portrayed as smart women who basically use their magical abilities for good.  In the book (which I read - John Updike), there are lesbian overtones and the (spoilers ahead) women do something cruel to the daughter of one of the characters because they are jealous of Daryl's attention to her.

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4 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Wally Cox was on Hollywood Squares.  I was too young for Mr. Peepers (before my time and don't remember seeing repeats, like I Love Lucy).  Paul Lynde (Uncle Arthur on Bewitched and the father in Bye Bye Birdie) was hilarious in the center square.  Charlie Weaver AKA Cliff Arquette.  Great show to see some old-time veterans.

Last night, until it got to the ridiculous ending, I watched The Witches of Eastwick.  I don't know whose idea it was to tamper with the plot.  In the movie, they are portrayed as smart women who basically use their magical abilities for good.  In the book (which I read - John Updike), there are lesbian overtones and the (spoilers ahead) women do something cruel to the daughter of one of the characters because they are jealous of Daryl's attention to her.

Yes, I read the book also and hated the film version.

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1 minute ago, TikiSoo said:

One of the things I lament about our a la carte TV viewing is that there was something wonderful knowing a million other people around the country were seeing & experiencing the same thing you were. It was second only to the theater experience - I am SO LOOKING FORWARD to seeing a movie in a theater with hundreds of others!

One of the reasons, I think, coupled with the rise of media platforms (social and otherwise) that tailor your media diet for you algorithmically,  things seem so fractious today in society and politics.  Everyone is off in their own silos, consuming media in their own echo chambers.  There's no real broadcasting anymore, where large proportions of the population are reached at the same time.

 

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25 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

I adore Reta Shaw, my Mother would be horrified to know it's because she reminds me of her! MrPeepers was before my time too, but like The Betty White Show, I'm aware of it. I definitely am familiar with Wally Cox's schtick.

We've all had Reta Shaw characters in our lives!

Reta Shaw (with Ernest Truex) appeared on the first nine episodes of The Ann Sothern Show, but the network tweaked the show at that point and replaced them with Don Porter as Ann's boss. (The Ann Sothern Show was Ann's second show, 1958-1961. Her first was Private Secretary, 1953-1957. 

 

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42 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

 I definitely am familiar with Wally Cox's schtick.

Wally was Marlon Brando's closest friend. And vice-versa. They were BFFs.

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39 minutes ago, Swithin said:

We've all had Reta Shaw characters in our lives!

One of my favorites was as the leader of the Psychic Occult Society in The Ghost And Mr Chicken

image.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

One of my favorites was as the leader of the Psychic Occult Society in The Ghost And Mr Chicken

image.jpeg

All the actors in that movie are so good, I watched it recently, thinking I would just check out five minutes and turn it off and the whole damn thing is pretty hilarious.

“ATTA BOY LUTHER!!!”

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

One of my favorites was as the leader of the Psychic Occult Society in The Ghost And Mr Chicken

Apart from TG&MC, I only know Reta Shaw as the Banks' cook from Mary Poppins:

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(As chimney sweeps cavort in the living room:)  "Ahh!  They're at it again!"

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Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970) 
*Number 1/26 for Criterion Neo-Noir Collection* 

I had never heard of this film before a few days ago, upon checking the new additions to the Criterion Channel website, but this was more fun than I had previously anticipated. The film  follows a duo of detectives who are searching for a cotton bale in which a large sum of stolen money is hidden. These two detectives are great; I really enjoyed the two of them. There were a couple shootouts, some comedic moments, and some.... shall we say... bare necessities on display (not that I mind; I just don't think I'm used to the seventies yet and how vastly different they were than the sixties). All in all, not a bad way to begin my neo-noir quest. 
Cotton Comes to Harlem · SFMOMA

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Girl Interrupted (1999) A setting almost exclusively within the walls of a mental institution for young girls.  When Winona Ryder❤️ asks the authorities for a diagnosis, she is told that she has "Borderline Personality."  I laughed at that. Surely that is as crock of hooey. After the movie, I looked it up and right there it is. Borderline personality, never hoid of it. In seems like an incomplete diagnosis. Borderline what? Angelina Jolie, a name which means "pretty angel," is anything but in this one. I did not know that she had the acting chops to do what she does here. I thought she was just another pretty face with a sweetie-pie name who made a movie now and then.  In this one, she is a precocious wildcat from hell with a sharp tongue, so sharp in fact that she is adept of doing extensive damage to the psyche of others, just by blabbing. I believe she earned an award for it and I think Winona should get one too. Winona doesn't seem all that far gone (for the most part, or at least at first) and that works because it helps us to identify with her. At one point I thought this was going to be about a sane girl trapped in an institutional. She does, however, try to talk her way out by saying, "I did NOT commit suicide." This sets up a favorite line. When this strapping young fellow tries to convince her to go to Canada with him (he if fleeing military service) she declines. When he insists that she is all right, she says, "Well, I tried to commit suicide," (now we know she is getting better).  He tries to laugh it off, only a few pills ... she says, "I swallowed a whole bottle." This exchange is not an especially dramatic moment or anything but i was moved by it. It reminded me of Kearce wanting Joe Clay to have, "just a few drinks." This is near the end when Kearcy is still far gone and Joe is in tenuous sobriety living in a dump with a kid in the back room. "We don't have just a few drinks" he says, "WE GET DRUNK!!!." Sometimes you just have tell it like it is.  As might be expected with a realistically gritty treatment that GI gets , there is a particularly wrenching scene (okay, more than one).

///

 

 

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On 7/8/2021 at 9:57 AM, Hibi said:

I wish I could see BOOM! again! (I think the ex. point was in the title. LOL) It's never on tv! :(

A few years ago I happened to catch BOOM!  playing on some channel (It wasn't TCM). I think Alan Cumming was discussing it.  From the dialogue I could tell that it was adapted from the Tennessee Williams play THE MILK TRAIN DOESN'T STOP HERE ANYMORE.  Elizabeth Taylor was too young for the role she played and Richard Burton was too old  for his role,  but I was very impressed with Taylor's performance.  Those lines are not easy ones make sound real and I think she succeeded in doing that. 

The name of Noël Coward's character was The Witch of Capri.

And, yes the exclamation point was part of the title!

BOOM!

c82a2a6a00070015ed65e24d68f65408.jpg

 

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12 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I adore Reta Shaw

One of my favorite Reta Shaw moments is her duet in The Pajama Game with Eddie Foy, Jr., "I'll Never Be Jealous Again."  I love her authoritativeness, her immaculate diction, and especially her unexpected delicacy in the delightful softshoe routine Bob Fosse choreographed for the two of them:

 

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8 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

And, yes the exclamation point was part of the title!

BOOM!

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Looks like the big BOOM! is from Liz's head exploding. ^^^

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Wow. 
 

Watching THE CHAPMAN REPORT For the first time after reading a lot about it.

At absolutely no time watching this would you ever guess in your wildest dreams that Jane Fonda would go on to be a two time Oscar winner.
 

HOO BOY, SHE IS BAD!!!!!!!!
 

Just murders every scene she’s in with her bare hands.

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32 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

At absolutely no time watching this would you ever guess in your wildest dreams that Jane Fonda would go on to be a two time Oscar winner.

Well, she clearly became a more skilled actress later on, but that was partly facilitated by finally being cast in less fluffy roles.  I'll admit, though, that even at her best (e.g., Klute or The China Syndrome) I often find myself admiring her alert intelligence and "acting choices" rather than being fully convinced by her embodiment of a character.  I'm conscious of the wheels turning in her head, as if some part of her were always standing outside the character rather simply relaxing into it. 

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1 hour ago, Fausterlitz said:

Well, she clearly became a more skilled actress later on, but that was partly facilitated by finally being cast in less fluffy roles.  I'll admit, though, that even at her best (e.g., Klute or The China Syndrome) I often find myself admiring her alert intelligence and "acting choices" rather than being fully convinced by her embodiment of a character.  I'm conscious of the wheels turning in her head, as if some part of her were always standing outside the character rather simply relaxing into it. 

Yes!!!

For the record, FONDA did improve infinitely as an actress, but there is always something slightly mechanical about her.

I was stunned to read Pauline Kael’s review of CHAPMAN Where is she praises JANE being such a “light comedienne.”

On what planet deprived completely of oxygen would this be, Pauline?

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1 minute ago, Moe Howard said:

A real stinker-oo. WTH was that accent supposed to be?

I was quite surprised at how natural and restrained Shelley Winters was though. And Glynnis Johns is always worth watching.

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18 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Glynnis Johns

She is a hoot. Just beside herself from ogling Ty on the beach.  Runs home and feels up her husband for comparison. "You ever think about going to the gym dear?"

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Jane, Hanoi Jane to many people who were around during Viet Nam.  And you have to own up to both the good and the bad in your past.  H.J. has failed on many accounts.  The first time I saw Hanoi Jane was in Cat Ballou; but, then again, Lee Marvin as lookalikes (I think he won an Oscar for it) stole the show.

Last night, I watched Only The Lonely with John Candy (died too young), Ally Sheedy and Maureen O'Hara. A really cute movie with a good supporting cast (Jim Blueshi, Milo O'Shea, Bill Murray and Anthony Quinn).  The three leads have good chemistry and I liked watching an overweight man fall in love with a svelte, beautiful woman.  I believe this was O'Hara's last film.  He is a proud Irish woman who is extremely prejudiced  She uses some offensive racial slurs.  What I found funny was that, when I press my Spectrum info to give me the actors/cast, they don't list Quinn.  Quinn is in love with O'Hara - so I was thinking, "Hey the Duke or John Wayne isn't here, so now I can get the "girl.".

After that, I watched Anne Bancroft, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Sigourney Weaver , and exhibiting some real flair for comedy, Ray Liotta.  If you haven't seen a film, the women are scammers.  Sigourney and her daughter, Love Hewitt, plot to marry men who can't keep it in their pants, and, therefore, are forced to be granted huge settlements.  Anne Bancroft had a flair for both comedy and drama, and even though she has limited screen time, she does make an impact.  Gene Hackman also has a great bit part as a potential mate for Weaver.  So do Carrie Fischer (sp?) and Sarah Silverman.

After that, went to Some Kind of Wonderful but I fell asleep while watching it.  Cute film directed by John Hughes.  Nice to see GH's Jane Elliot as Eric Stoltz's Mom. Leah Thompson plays against type as a high school "****,." while Mary Stuart Masterson plays a tomboyish girl.  Nice plot line about living up to your parents' expectations.

 

Re: Pajama Game.  Isn't that where Shirley MacLaine got her big break?

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MoeHoward (I always though the Stoogies were a male thing), did you see the beautiful Glynnis (daughter of Mervyn) did you see her in The Court Jester?  One of the films I wish TCM or some other film network would run again.  Also, if you are a Glynnis fan, Sondheim wrote Send in the Clowns for her (from A Little Night Music) because she wasn't really a singer.  As for her Dad, usually on Halloween, TCM runs Dead of Night, which I believe he is in.

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33 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

For the record, FONDA did improve infinitely as an actress, but there is always something slightly mechanical about her.

I couldn't help thinking (possibly overthinking) about this a bit more, and my prevailing theory is that Jane Fonda has such a "wide-awake" quality in real life--she's so used to speaking her mind without hesitation, without apparent concern for the possible consequences, that perhaps she's less familiar with the cognitive dissonance most of the rest of us mere mortals routinely experience, as we notice the frequent gap between what we intend to say and what actually comes out of our mouths.  Most of us are not as comfortable being relentlessly forthright or blunt; we often have conflicting emotions that we're either consciously or unconsciously trying to suppress or mask when we speak.  And most well-written believable movie dialogue reflects this reality, which is why actors spend so much time worrying about "subtext": what is being implied, but left unsaid, by these words? What other things might I secretly be feeling, remembering, or thinking about when saying them?

So maybe that's part of what creates this slightly mechanical quality: a certain lack of inner tension, uncertainty or complexity, rather than the impression of words emerging organically from a naturally messy, imperfect mixture of thought, intention, and emotion.

(Just for the record, I don't mean anything political or particularly judgmental by the first paragraph--"speaking one's mind without hesitation" can be either admirable or problematic, depending on the context.)

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