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11 hours ago, Fausterlitz said:

One of my favorite Reta Shaw moments is her duet in The Pajama Game with Eddie Foy, Jr., "I'll Never Be Jealous Again."  I love her authoritativeness, her immaculate diction, and especially her unexpected delicacy in the delightful softshoe routine Bob Fosse choreographed for the two of them:

 

My favorite Reta Shaw role is from a TV series, not a film:

As Big Maude Tyler, alias Clarice Tyler, Maude Clarice Tyler, Annabelle Tyler and Ralph Henderson  from The Andy Griffith Show

 

Pollyanna (1960) – My Live Action Disney Project

 

 

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I just watched OBSESSION (1976)- the image above was SO GIANT, I figured I should just let it have its own space.

I really liked this movie a lot more than I expected to- although I don't quite see why BERNARD HERRMAN got an Oscar nomination for re-heating his score for VERTIGO, maybe his dying helped push him over the hump that year.

warning spoilers possible

as you watch this movie, you will inevitably more or less guess the ending, BUT there are a couple of really well-done surprises at the reveal- which was marred for me by the fact THAT THE SOUND WENT OUT ON MY TELEVISION during the denoument  (I thought for a long time it was just DePalma being "arty" before I realized "no.")

thankfully it was just a glitch and i resumed watching after turning the tv off and back on.

I'm always going to be a little standoffish with CLIFF ROBERTSON over the SHAME episodes of the BATMAN tv series, but I respect the talent that is there. question: was this the film where he discovered the head of Columbia was stealing money on?

GENEVIEVE BUJOLD is a fascinator- even with a bad haircut- and she has a particularly standout scene where she handles some complicated dialogue about restoring a fresco on the wall of a church in Italy and discovering an original artwork underneath that is pivotal.

If I liked DON'T LOOK BACK at all I would suggest it as a double feature with this film, but I really don't.

quite well filmed and photgraphed, I didn't mind the constant Vaseline on the camera, but I couldn't help but wonder if the shooting of this movie and MAME in the same year didn't perhaps jump-start the petroleum crisis of the 1970s.

there was only one thing that I did NOT like in this movie and that is JOHN LITHGOW. He is dreadful. Some actors are just utterly incapable of subtlety. They compulsively overract.

I have never liked JOHN LITHGOW- with the exception of the time that he admonished the audience upon winning his third inexplicable Emmy in a row for THIRD ROCK FROM THE SUN for honoring him for work that he thought was AWFUL. 

THANK GOD I wasn't in the audience because I would have instantly done one of these:

R.48eea96edc0657392205773d0744d072?rik=p

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25 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I really liked this movie a lot more than I expected to- although I don't quite see why BERNARD HERRMAN got an Oscar nomination for re-heating his score for VERTIGO, maybe his dying helped push him over the hump that year.

These De Palma efforts with Bernard Herrmann scores and plots that rehash Hitchcock, I don't know, it's just too much Hitchcok-ery. 

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

actually, I remembered just now that JOHN LITHGOW is pretty good in TERMS OF ENDEARMENT.

He's good in This is 40 too.  One of my favorite scenes he's not in below.

 

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Just now, Moe Howard said:

These De Palma efforts with Bernard Herrmann scores and plots that rehash Hitchcock, I don't know, it's just too much Hitchcok-ery. 

If he had JUST STOPPED after OBSESSION there would not have been this problem. But for some reason he was just COMPELLED to return to the well time and again.

really though, from someone who HATES DRESSED TO KILL and is "eh" on BODY DOUBLE, I thought OBSESSION was good.

(He pulls some tricks at the end that make it unique.)

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(He pulls some tricks at the end that make it unique.)

Unique like Chinatown unique?

Agree Obsession is the better of those three. I liked both Dressed to Kill because I had a thing for Nancy Allen for a little bit and Body Double because of the landmarks around my neighborhood at the time.  Barney's Beanery!!!! before they remodeled it. *sniff*

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1 minute ago, Moe Howard said:

Unique like Chinatown unique?

Agree Obsession is the better of those three. I liked both Dressed to Kill because I had a thing for Nancy Allen for a little bit and Body Double because of the landmarks around my neighborhood at the time.  Barney's Beanery!!!! before the remodeled it. *sniff*

OH GOD DAMN, I COULD GO FOR SOME BARNEY'S BEANERY RIGHT NOW.........!!!!!!!!!!!

(also lived in LA for a bit)

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spoiler in re: OBSESSION (1975)

 

 

 

The biggest surprise for me was the happy ending, and there was genuine tension in the airport scene....the spinning at the end went on for too long, but the rest I was okay with.

 

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and call me nuts, but I also found the premise of the movie to be pretty viable and believable, not just for a DePalma movie (it's his most grounded movie that I have seen) but for a movie period.

it made sense, i bought it, I don't really have questions.

can't say the same for, um, everything else I've ever seen by Brian DePalma.

 

**I still haven't seen SCARFACE though

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The Court Jester is Danny Kaye (along with Basil Rathbone and Angela Lansbury).  Another of Kaye is mistaken from someone else.  Also, a takeoff on Robin Hood.  Known for such clever lines as the Flagon with the Dragon having the brew that is true.  Good fencing action (Rathbone was in the Errol F. version) between Rathbone & Kaye.

As for Lithgow, good in some things (he was in Garp also).

I like Al Pacino and Michelle P. when they paired in the movie version of Frankie & Johnnie (not the Presley one).  Scarface is not a remake of the original (and it is fairly bad).

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I just watched OBSESSION (1976)- the image above was SO GIANT, I figured I should just let it have its own space.

I really liked this movie a lot more than I expected to- although I don't quite see why BERNARD HERRMAN got an Oscar nomination for re-heating his score for VERTIGO, maybe his dying helped push him over the hump that year.

warning spoilers possible

as you watch this movie, you will inevitably more or less guess the ending, BUT there are a couple of really well-done surprises at the reveal- which was marred for me by the fact THAT THE SOUND WENT OUT ON MY TELEVISION during the denoument  (I thought for a long time it was just DePalma being "arty" before I realized "no.")

thankfully it was just a glitch and i resumed watching after turning the tv off and back on.

I'm always going to be a little standoffish with CLIFF ROBERTSON over the SHAME episodes of the BATMAN tv series, but I respect the talent that is there. question: was this the film where he discovered the head of Columbia was stealing money on?

GENEVIEVE BUJOLD is a fascinator- even with a bad haircut- and she has a particularly standout scene where she handles some complicated dialogue about restoring a fresco on the wall of a church in Italy and discovering an original artwork underneath that is pivotal.

If I liked DON'T LOOK BACK at all I would suggest it as a double feature with this film, but I really don't.

quite well filmed and photgraphed, I didn't mind the constant Vaseline on the camera, but I couldn't help but wonder if the shooting of this movie and MAME in the same year didn't perhaps jump-start the petroleum crisis of the 1970s.

there was only one thing that I did NOT like in this movie and that is JOHN LITHGOW. He is dreadful. Some actors are just utterly incapable of subtlety. They compulsively overract.

I have never liked JOHN LITHGOW- with the exception of the time that he admonished the audience upon winning his third inexplicable Emmy in a row for THIRD ROCK FROM THE SUN for honoring him for work that he thought was AWFUL. 

THANK GOD I wasn't in the audience because I would have instantly done one of these:

R.48eea96edc0657392205773d0744d072?rik=p

Yes, this was the film where Robertson revealed about the financial scandal at Columbia. I do feel it was the best of the De Palma films I saw, more subtle, less overheated, classier, and very effective, especially Bujold's performance. I thought though that Bernard Herrmann's score was excellent, and even if it is a bit like Vertigo's score, it takes off to its own dimension. I think he should have won the Oscar for it, but he split his posthumous votes with his score for Taxi Driver, propelling Jerry Goldsmith to the only win of his career with The Omen. The other 2 nominated scores were The Outlaw Josey Wales and Voyage of the Damned (the five that just missed a musical score  nomination that year were King Kong, Logan's Run, Rocky [!?!], The Pink Panther Strikes Again, and Silent Movie)

As for Lithgow at the Emmys, its worth noting he didn't win another Emmy after he revealed what he thought about the show he was on, but it seems that prior to that the category was in a funk alternating between Lithgow and Kelsey Grammer on Frasier (the better show). 

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

and call me nuts, but I also found the premise of the movie to be pretty viable and believable, not just for a DePalma movie (it's his most grounded movie that I have seen) but for a movie period.

it made sense, i bought it, I don't really have questions.

can't say the same for, um, everything else I've ever seen by Brian DePalma.

 

**I still haven't seen SCARFACE though

Lorna, about X, Y, & Zee: Susannah York very earnestly does all the "creating a character" things one might do in an ordinary movie, but you'd think Michael Caine would have taken her aside and said, "Darling, this is a piece of caca and all you have to do is show up and take the money the way Liz and I are doing." So much of Elizabeth Taylor's later career seems to consist of variations on her aging, shrewish, and drunken character in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, but she's no longer getting dialogue by Edward Albee, direction by Mike Nichols, etc.

And to follow up on the interesting discussion of Jane Fonda: Fonda strikes me as having no real center to her personality, so she goes through phases to find meaning in her life: Sex Kitten Jane, Political Jane, Serious Actress Jane, Fitness Jane, Born-Again Jane, Philanthropist Jane, and so on. Some of us have known people like that (especially if we were around during the 1960s), but not many have the money and celebrity that Fonda has had.

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4 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I like Al Pacino and Michelle P. when they paired in the movie version of Frankie & Johnnie

Not having seen it, I'm curious to know how this casting works, since in the original play, Frankie is supposed to be "frumpy, fat, and emotionally defined by her unattractiveness."  (In the original production, she was played by Kathy Bates.)  At least on paper, Michelle Pfeiffer as Frankie sounds a bit like casting Angie Dickinson as the lonely Clara in Marty (a role for which Betsy Blair was in some ways already a bit too attractive, at least compared to the original TV version's Nancy Marchand).

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And Kathy Bates lost her " 'night Mother" stage role to Sissy Spacek for the film version. 

I remember reading an article where she threw some shade at the industry about being passed over for the parts.

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1 hour ago, Roy Cronin said:

I remember reading an article where she threw some shade at the industry about being passed over for the parts.

And it's not like she's actively unattractive or anything--she's just (God forbid) a regular-looking person with major acting chops. Which is precisely what both roles required.

At least Pfeiffer and Spacek are both fine actresses, and their casting may have been partly intended to increase the marketability of what were likely seen as commercially risky projects.  But since Bates had already received a Tony nomination for 'night, Mother and an Obie Award for Frankie and Johnny, her attitude is totally understandable.

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Finally watched "The Road to Hong Kong" on my DVR.  Very little about Hong Kong and a lot about outer space nonsense, with Joan Collins as the romance object for both Crosby and Hope.

What a stinker.

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In Hollywood, if you are a woman, it is a sin to be fat.  Also, people on Broadway also lose out when the film is cast (the most "infamous" being My Fair Lady - nice that Julie later expressed having no problem with it - and Eliza is a much more difficult part than Mary Poppins (although, that same year, Julie was in The Americanization of Emily and Emily was a very complex character).  It reminds me of when Diane Keaton won for Annie Hall (I believe she made Looking for Mr. Goodbar the same year). 

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Last night, I watched early SVU episodes and didn't remember one of my favorite actress, Elizabeth Ashley (who is still with us) played her mother who was raped (Olivia Benson was the result of that rape).  I like the earlier episodes of SVU.  And Ice-T is now with Jennifer Espisito (sp?) who was on an early episode where she played a rape victim.  She didn't last long on Blue Bloods or NCIS. Has anyone heard whether she is difficult to work with?  I remember something about her saying she lost her job because celiac disease prevented her from working numerous hours.

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8 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Last night, I watched early SVU episodes and didn't remember one of my favorite actress, Elizabeth Ashley (who is still with us) played her mother who was raped (Olivia Benson was the result of that rape).  I like the earlier episodes of SVU.  And Ice-T is now with Jennifer Espisito (sp?) who was on an early episode where she played a rape victim.  She didn't last long on Blue Bloods or NCIS. Has anyone heard whether she is difficult to work with?  I remember something about her saying she lost her job because celiac disease prevented her from working numerous hours.

DICK WOLF who produces all the LAW AND ORDER shows is a pretty notorious mysogonistic hole.

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[author's note, I apologize if I get colorful in my review of the below film, i just am in one of those moods today.]

Jesus Christ, I finally finished REMEMBER MY NAME (1978)

Remember My Name (1978) DVDRip [1.46GB] - Free Download | Cinema of the  World

(IRONICALLY I have the hardest time remembering the name of this film)

i STARTED WATCHING IT when it first aired some months ago on TCM UNDERGROUND and quit twenty minutes in. it encored on Saturday night and showed up ON DEMAND and  I proceeded to watch and quit watching it three times before pausing to see how much longer I had to go, Upon seeing there were 12 minutes left, i ended up fast forwarding to the end;  [SUE ME. life is short and we live in troubled times. ]

GOOD GOD THIS MOVIE IS A LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONG HOUR AND THIRTY THREE MINUTES.

I'll start with something good: I do think GERALDINE CHAPLIN was terrific in the part (and I haaaaaated her in NASHVILLE), she had a way of LITERALLY HARDENING HER FACE and then SOFTENING IT depending on the mood her mercurial character was in- she literally transformed on screen (and when it came to acting via expression, i think it's safe to say she was obviously a natural thanks to her DNA)

UNFORTUNATELY, this was the one time ANTHONY PERKINS decided to underplay a role, and who wants to see that?

Also, forgive me because I know she died tragically, but omiGAH BERRY BERENSON is SUCH A WHITE BREAD AND MAYO SANDWICH...although I have to say, the potential lesbian locksmith love liaison that is suggested for her character in the end of the film would make a worthwhile story.

really, ALL THE PERIPHERAL CHARACTERS that we meet in this movie seem like THEY WOULD BE FAR MORE INTERESTING if the film were about THEM and not these two drips and the whackjob.

I said this in another thread, but I will say it again- odd as it may sound- I think this story told with an all-Black cast and a different setting could have been spectacular.

Oh, and A DIFFERENT DIRECTOR because- at this point- I HATE ALAN RUDOLPH. I HATE AFTERGLOW. I HATE MRS PARKER AND... AND (more or less) I hate this movie.

Also the music sucks.

There I said it, go ahead and sue me for that too.

I'm sorry I'm so salty lately. I'm going through some stuff....

ps- I want to legally petition the MPAA to change the name of this film to TWO DRIPS AND THE WHACKJOB, it's much more memorable than...REMEMBER MY NAME, which I will let you know is a futile request for a movie this forgettable to make in any manner.

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The Man Who Cheated Himself (1950)

 

A woman finally realizes that her husband is a fortune hunter and decides to divorce him. He realizes that his only hope of keeping his meal ticket is to murder her before she meets with her attorney. Her current lover is present when the attempt is made.

I firmly believe that this might have been a great movie if it had had a larger budget and different leads. The script is reasonably solid, the direction is quite adequate, the editing is deft and the cinematography borders on excellent. It seems to me to be missing atmospheric details which could not be included in a limited budget.

There is no accounting for the human heart but I could not square Lee J. Cobb as a semi-tough cop who would lose his head so completely over a dame. It is my personal preference that a noir have a femme fatale who is actually present and not phoning in the performance from her beachfront condo as Jane Wyatt does here. 

I found John Dall to deliver the best performance which is both a wonderful and a sad indictment of the movie. He is perfect as a boyishly simple honest cop who finds himself in a horrible predicament and forging ahead despite knowing how much it will hurt to reveal the truth.

Alan Wells has only a small role but I found it to be very powerful and more interesting than the two leads'. Lisa Howard plays John Dall's wife quite well.

6.3/10

I watched it on: Amazon Prime Video. I see that it is listed on several streaming services and available for free viewing on: The Film Detective. 

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