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22 hours ago, Fausterlitz said:

Not having seen it, I'm curious to know how this casting works, since in the original play, Frankie is supposed to be "frumpy, fat, and emotionally defined by her unattractiveness."  (In the original production, she was played by Kathy Bates.)  At least on paper, Michelle Pfeiffer as Frankie sounds a bit like casting Angie Dickinson as the lonely Clara in Marty (a role for which Betsy Blair was in some ways already a bit too attractive, at least compared to the original TV version's Nancy Marchand).

I don't remember the film too clearly. I think it was OK, with Pacino well cast, and decent chemistry with the leads. It becomes more of a two lonely people in the big city film. The concept of an unattractive woman, or a woman who feels she isn't attractive, gets lost. Michelle Pfeiffer is less glamorous than usual, which in Hollywood terms is more like instead of looking like Miss Universe, she's only the fourth runner-up.

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

[author's note, I apologize if I get colorful in my review of the below film, i just am in one of those moods today.]

Jesus Christ, I finally finished REMEMBER MY NAME (1978)

Remember My Name (1978) DVDRip [1.46GB] - Free Download | Cinema of the  World

(IRONICALLY I have the hardest time remembering the name of this film)

i STARTED WATCHING IT when it first aired some months ago on TCM UNDERGROUND and quit twenty minutes in. it encored on Saturday night and showed up ON DEMAND and  I proceeded to watch and quit watching it three times before pausing to see how much longer I had to go, Upon seeing there were 12 minutes left, i ended up fast forwarding to the end;  [SUE ME. life is short and we live in troubled times. ]

GOOD GOD THIS MOVIE IS A LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONG HOUR AND THIRTY THREE MINUTES.

 

Oh, and A DIFFERENT DIRECTOR because- at this point- I HATE ALAN RUDOLPH. I HATE AFTERGLOW. I HATE MRS PARKER AND... AND (more or less) I hate this movie.

I haven't seen any of those Alan Rudolph movies, but I have seen others. Roadie is like a made-for-TV movie with Kris Kristofferson, nothing special. Made for Each Other (I think that's the title) with Timothy Hutton and Kelly McGillis is awful; individual scenes are fine, but the movie has no rhythm, doesn't make a whole lot of sense, and seems LOOOONG. I have a couple of friends who really liked The Moderns, but I was less fond of it. Linda Fiorentino seems to be from the Troy Donahue Academy of Acting, though I understand she is good in other movies.

But there's good news, too. Some people hate Welcome to L.A., but I liked the movie a lot. It's like Nashville (where Rudolph was an assistant director) but without the "This is a metaphor for America" pretentiousness. Choose Me is one of my favorite films from the 1980s. As with Welcome to L.A., the characters keep meeting in odd and unexpected ways. Lesley Ann Warren has her best role ever as a woman who falls for a guy (Keith Carradine, in one of his best roles) who is an outrageous liar, or is he? Genevieve Bujold (love her) gets to play a radio version of Dr. Ruth.

Trouble in Mind is a little more problematic than the other two--Divine as a male gangster is an interesting idea that doesn't quite work. I would never have cast Genevieve Bujold as a diner owner named Wanda, but I would have been wrong. Wanda is the ex-lover of Kris Kristofferson, who, instead of begging her to take him back, goes after a girl (Lori Singer) who's younger than Wanda and has lots more long curly-permed hair. Bujold handles this with far more maturity and objectivity and kindness than I would have, and the film is worth seeing for her great performance.

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Blade Runner: The Final Cut (2007)
 

 

A retired policeman is brought back to the force to locate four illegal immigrants.

The gutters of Hollywood are filled with misfires when a great director with a great story and a great cast created a mediocre movie. This is not one of them.

Ridley Scott creates immersive and intense realities for the viewer to become lost in for hours. This is perhaps his best. You do not watch this movie. You are in that world with all its glitter and grime. Bright neon and manufactured owls and people as cheap commodities. 

Harrison Ford becomes consuming and conflicted characters. He can not afford to be as free and easy here as he is as Indiana Jones. His Deckard has learned well that only the cold and calculating survive and he is totally dedicated to self-survival.

Every noir needs a femme fatale. Sean Young fills that role perfectly. She is inhumanly icy and aloof. A rock against which men crash themselves.

The story is based on a novel by Philip K. Dick. He was not as prolific as Asimov, Clarke or Heinlein but he will be forever remembered for the depth of his stories and how they questioned perception, human nature and identity. 

Rutger Hauer was constructed for combat but has the mind of a philosopher and the soul of a poet. The entire movie is worth watching simply for his eloquent and deeply moving soliloquy.  

William Sanderson, Daryl Hannah, Joe Turkel, Joanna Cassidy, Brion James and Edward James Olmos are all at their best in this movie.

Many movies have sequels. The vision in this movie is so complex and expansive that seven versions have been created by re-editing and minor refinements. "The Final Cut" is the director's last word.

9.6/10

I watched this on DVD but it is schedule to soon appear on TCM.

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7 versions of BLADE RUNNER . . . I knew there were a lot of different versions of "Blade Runner" extant. 

Just like STAR WARS.  I've lost count of how many different versions of Star Wars (1977) are floating around in the Cosmos.  

I noted director ALAN RUDOLPH was mentioned above; I liked Welcome to L.A. (1977), but Afterglow I found unsatisfying -- I didn't hate it or anything that bad, but I wasn't pleased and have not re-visited it since.  Those are the only two Alan Rudolph-directed movies I've seen.   

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On 7/9/2021 at 9:54 PM, HoldenIsHere said:

A few years ago I happened to catch BOOM!  playing on some channel (It wasn't TCM). I think Alan Cumming was discussing it.  From the dialogue I could tell that it was adapted from the Tennessee Williams play THE MILK TRAIN DOESN'T STOP HERE ANYMORE.  Elizabeth Taylor was too young for the role she played and Richard Burton was too old  for his role,  but I was very impressed with Taylor's performance.  Those lines are not easy ones make sound real and I think she succeeded in doing that. 

The name of Noël Coward's character was The Witch of Capri.

And, yes the exclamation point was part of the title!

BOOM!

c82a2a6a00070015ed65e24d68f65408.jpg

 

LMREO!!! They actually wanted K. Hepburn for the witch. She turned them down.

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

LMREO!!! They actually wanted K. Hepburn for the witch. She turned them down.

Hibi, maybe they could have traded roles. Katherine Hepburn in Boom! and Noel Coward in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.

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Why didn't the makers of BOOM! hire Margaret Hamilton to play 'The Witch'?  Seems logical enough to me if Katharine Hepburn turned them down. 

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15 hours ago, kingrat said:

I haven't seen any of those Alan Rudolph movies, but I have seen others. Roadie is like a made-for-TV movie with Kris Kristofferson, nothing special. Made for Each Other (I think that's the title) with Timothy Hutton and Kelly McGillis is awful; individual scenes are fine, but the movie has no rhythm, doesn't make a whole lot of sense, and seems LOOOONG. I have a couple of friends who really liked The Moderns, but I was less fond of it. Linda Fiorentino seems to be from the Troy Donahue Academy of Acting, though I understand she is good in other movies.

But there's good news, too. Some people hate Welcome to L.A., but I liked the movie a lot. It's like Nashville (where Rudolph was an assistant director) but without the "This is a metaphor for America" pretentiousness. Choose Me is one of my favorite films from the 1980s. As with Welcome to L.A., the characters keep meeting in odd and unexpected ways. Lesley Ann Warren has her best role ever as a woman who falls for a guy (Keith Carradine, in one of his best roles) who is an outrageous liar, or is he? Genevieve Bujold (love her) gets to play a radio version of Dr. Ruth.

Trouble in Mind is a little more problematic than the other two--Divine as a male gangster is an interesting idea that doesn't quite work. I would never have cast Genevieve Bujold as a diner owner named Wanda, but I would have been wrong. Wanda is the ex-lover of Kris Kristofferson, who, instead of begging her to take him back, goes after a girl (Lori Singer) who's younger than Wanda and has lots more long curly-permed hair. Bujold handles this with far more maturity and objectivity and kindness than I would have, and the film is worth seeing for her great performance.

I haven't seen Remember My Name in a long time, but I liked it. One of the few Rudolph films I did like. Great score by Alberta Hunter.

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On 7/10/2021 at 12:36 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I just watched OBSESSION (1976)- the image above was SO GIANT, I figured I should just let it have its own space.

I really liked this movie a lot more than I expected to- although I don't quite see why BERNARD HERRMAN got an Oscar nomination for re-heating his score for VERTIGO, maybe his dying helped push him over the hump that year.

warning spoilers possible

as you watch this movie, you will inevitably more or less guess the ending, BUT there are a couple of really well-done surprises at the reveal- which was marred for me by the fact THAT THE SOUND WENT OUT ON MY TELEVISION during the denoument  (I thought for a long time it was just DePalma being "arty" before I realized "no.")

thankfully it was just a glitch and i resumed watching after turning the tv off and back on.

I'm always going to be a little standoffish with CLIFF ROBERTSON over the SHAME episodes of the BATMAN tv series, but I respect the talent that is there. question: was this the film where he discovered the head of Columbia was stealing money on?

GENEVIEVE BUJOLD is a fascinator- even with a bad haircut- and she has a particularly standout scene where she handles some complicated dialogue about restoring a fresco on the wall of a church in Italy and discovering an original artwork underneath that is pivotal.

If I liked DON'T LOOK BACK at all I would suggest it as a double feature with this film, but I really don't.

quite well filmed and photgraphed, I didn't mind the constant Vaseline on the camera, but I couldn't help but wonder if the shooting of this movie and MAME in the same year didn't perhaps jump-start the petroleum crisis of the 1970s.

there was only one thing that I did NOT like in this movie and that is JOHN LITHGOW. He is dreadful. Some actors are just utterly incapable of subtlety. They compulsively overract.

I have never liked JOHN LITHGOW- with the exception of the time that he admonished the audience upon winning his third inexplicable Emmy in a row for THIRD ROCK FROM THE SUN for honoring him for work that he thought was AWFUL. 

THANK GOD I wasn't in the audience because I would have instantly done one of these:

R.48eea96edc0657392205773d0744d072?rik=p

Would think MAME would've caused a vaseline shortage for other films!

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On 7/10/2021 at 7:13 PM, kingrat said:

Lorna, about X, Y, & Zee: Susannah York very earnestly does all the "creating a character" things one might do in an ordinary movie, but you'd think Michael Caine would have taken her aside and said, "Darling, this is a piece of caca and all you have to do is show up and take the money the way Liz and I are doing." So much of Elizabeth Taylor's later career seems to consist of variations on her aging, shrewish, and drunken character in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, but she's no longer getting dialogue by Edward Albee, direction by Mike Nichols, etc.

And to follow up on the interesting discussion of Jane Fonda: Fonda strikes me as having no real center to her personality, so she goes through phases to find meaning in her life: Sex Kitten Jane, Political Jane, Serious Actress Jane, Fitness Jane, Born-Again Jane, Philanthropist Jane, and so on. Some of us have known people like that (especially if we were around during the 1960s), but not many have the money and celebrity that Fonda has had.

Yes, Liz, did variations of Martha in many of her post Woolf films.  (To very diminishing box office returns). Need a shrew, call Taylor!

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Hibi, maybe they could have traded roles. Katherine Hepburn in Boom! and Noel Coward in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.

i would watch the everliving sh*t out of every last minute of either or both of those.

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On 7/11/2021 at 11:38 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Oh, and A DIFFERENT DIRECTOR because- at this point- I HATE ALAN RUDOLPH.

I...sort of liked Made in Heaven (1987), as Rudolph has fun Quirkily playing around with an otherwise screenwriter-concept fantasy premise and throwing a little visual and story imagination into the details.  

Casting Debra Winger in male drag as a quirky version of James Mason from "Heaven Can Wait" because...why not?...did seem a bit like why you shouldn't give Alan Rudolph TOO many mainstream movies, though.   🤨

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8 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

7 versions of BLADE RUNNER . . . I knew there were a lot of different versions of "Blade Runner" extant. 

Just like STAR WARS.  I've lost count of how many different versions of Star Wars (1977) are floating around in the Cosmos.  

I noted director ALAN RUDOLPH was mentioned above; I liked Welcome to L.A. (1977), but Afterglow I found unsatisfying -- I didn't hate it or anything that bad, but I wasn't pleased and have not re-visited it since.  Those are the only two Alan Rudolph-directed movies I've seen.   

IMO there's still only one REAL version of Star Wars, the original.  It keeps getting worse with each additional tweak.  Still have the original on VHS.

Is there a definitive version of Blade Runner? I've seen one version, don't know the name of it- it's just the one I rented when I was in high school.  Aren't there multiple endings out there?  Did the sequel validate one of the versions and being the one that was continued from?

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I just watched a sad little movie about an insufferably argumentative woman who gets left by her husband after 29 years of marriage.

The left wife is played by Annette Bening and the long-suffering husband by Bill Nighy. The movie is titled Hope Gap (2019).

It's very well acted by both leads, although Bening has the larger role and it's her show for the most part.

It's with mixed emotions for me when watching a formerly delectable woman like Bening (remember how hot she was in stuff like The Grifters - nude! - and Bugsy) as she ages into matronliness.

She still has a cute quality to her look, though - thanks to her chipmunky facial symmetry.

My rating 7 out of 10 for the skilled acting and entertaining dialogue.

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27 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

Is there a definitive version of Blade Runner? I've seen one version, don't know the name of it- it's just the one I rented when I was in high school.  Aren't there multiple endings out there?  Did the sequel validate one of the versions and being the one that was continued from?

It is my considered opinion that: Blade Runner: The Final Cut (2007) is the definitive version as it is the only one over which the director had total creative control. All others had major decisions made by others.

Which version that you saw would depend on the year and the format. I believe that: "International theatrical release" version was the only one available on VHS.

A more-or-less complete breakdown is available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Versions_of_Blade_Runner

 

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Julius Caesar (1953) Just to say that I enjoyed watching this and without getting into where it stands in the pantheon of Shakespeare endeavor, stage or screen, I just want to say that it was good seeing these Hollywood stars hammering out Shakespearean speeches, showing off their chops for this sort of thing, that is if they have any. I think they did or at least I enjoyed them. James Mason was well cast as Brutus fulfilling the need for gravitas and without the look of stark villainy though as we know he was no angel. Brando delivered those wonderful Mark Antony speeches with appropriate outrage. I wonder if they had to tell him, no slurring here, Marlon, this is Shakespeare. I didn't detect any. Louis Calhern looked a little goofy in the title role but the best thing about him was his largess. You have to be a big guy in that scene when he surrounded by seven or eight guys who take turns  stabbing him to death. Well, it helped a little with scene composition. Sir John Guilgud is the only bona fide Shakespearean actor in the whole cast. He played Cassius who is the main villain and has a lot of fiery, angry speeches. A little too much IMO. It's as if he was thinking, I am the real Shakespeare here and I must show these Americans how to do it. But he overdid it. Being nasty, or any other quality for that matter, is augmented by not being that way all the time. I was a little worried about Edmund O'Brien (who played Casca) as he seemed decidedly un-Shakespearean to me but he did okay. Good job, Ed.  Women get short shrift here, in fact, they are hardly visible. Greer Garson and Deborah Kerr have about one speech each. All in all, an entertaining watch. It wasn't a movie with a lot of Hollywood crap in it, it's pretty pure Shakespeare at it's "stuffy" best.

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, laffite said:

Julius Caesar (1953) Just to say that I enjoyed watching this and without getting into where it stands in the pantheon of Shakespeare endeavor, stage or screen, I just want to say that it was good seeing these Hollywood stars hammering out Shakespearean speeches, showing off their chops for this sort of thing, that is if they have any. I think they did or at least I enjoyed them. James Mason was well cast as Brutus fulfilling the need for gravitas and without the look of stark villainy though as we know he was no angel. Brando delivered those wonderful Mark Antony speeches with appropriate outrage. I wonder if they had to tell him, no slurring here, Marlon, this is Shakespeare. I didn't detect any.

 

 

 

I have a theory that John Gielgud helped Brando prepare his speeches. It's by far Brando's best-spoken role. Gielgud urged Brando to come to England and play Shakespeare.

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@Shank Asu:  I have a 1982 '20th Century Fox Video' release of STAR WARS on VHS.  That's the only version I'll watch.  Obviously not in W/S, but that's the way it went back then.  I don't know of any W/S VHS releases from back that far. 

@Sans Fin:  I like your 'considered opinion'.  Makes sense to me.  👍

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2 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Is there a definitive version of Blade Runner? I've seen one version, don't know the name of it- it's just the one I rented when I was in high school.  Aren't there multiple endings out there?  Did the sequel validate one of the versions and being the one that was continued from?

The fans seem to agree on the Final Cut as the, well, final one.  No film-noir narration for mainstream viewers' benefit, but also a minimum of artsy shots of unicorns, which were running through Ridley Scott's head while he was working on Legend.  I'm sure the significance was explained somewhere, but I missed it.

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10 minutes ago, kingrat said:

I have a theory that John Gielgud helped Brando prepare his speeches. It's by far Brando's best-spoken role. Gielgud urged Brando to come to England and play Shakespeare.

Interesting. The first thought to jump to mind is the role of Hamlet. He would be excellent in the Queen's closet scene where he can get rough and exhibit anger. The contemplative side of Hamlet is another story, but who knows? Personally, I think Shakespeare would have bored him. at least in the long run.

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1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@Shank Asu:  I have a 1982 '20th Century Fox Video' release of STAR WARS on VHS.  That's the only version I'll watch.  Obviously not in W/S, but that's the way it went back then.  I don't know of any W/S VHS releases from back that far. 

If you hurry NOW, you can still get the 2005 "Limited Edition" DVD's of the OT, 2-disk editions with the second disk as upgrades of the unsullied 80's W/S  laserdisc release of the Theatrical OT.  (There are one or two left going for $45 on Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/Star-Wars-Episode-IV-Limited/dp/B000FQJAIW )

Fans still argue and nag Disney about why we didn't get anything better than that, and more realistic fans already know why.  😔

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10 hours ago, Hibi said:

LMREO!!! They actually wanted K. Hepburn for the witch. She turned them down.

Yeah, John Waters mentioned at a screening of BOOM! about Katherine Hepburn turning down the role of the Witch of Capri. She was insulted that she was asked! (Kind of reminds me of Mary Pickford's reaction when she was approached about playing Norma Desmond in SUNSET BOULVEVARD.)

BOOM!  is a a favorite of John Waters  and he has said that it personifies his taste and influenced his aesthetics .  He also said that Elizabeth Taylor's performance as Mrs. Goforth in BOOM! was big  influence on Divine.  Waters and Divine watched BOOM! many times when they were young.  There's a part of PINK FLAMINGOS that was cut from the final version that was a direct homage to BOOM!  

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Speaking of DIVINE (Harris Glenn Milstead) . . . I've saved a newspaper article for over 33 years now.  From the 'ACCENT' Section of The Palm Beach Post, Wednesday, March 9, 1988. 

The headline read:  Divine's career was 'ready to take off'. 

And then underneath the headline in smaller print it read:  'Hairspray' actor's death comes at brink of success. 

There was also a black-and-white picture of Divine (as himself) with a caption underneath that read:  "Divine was most disturbed by being labeled a transvestite.  The word refers to someone who lives in drag.  "I'm not a transvestite" he said.  "It's part of the act . . . many of the different characters I do are women".  

I had seen LUST IN THE DUST on cable not long before Divine died and I'd never heard of him/her --  I didn't know who Divine was at the time.  Shortly thereafter I read he died when I looked at the 'ACCENT' Section of the Post that day.  The article mentioned "HAIRSPRAY is scheduled to open locally Friday" (which would have been March 11, 1988-- Divine died March 7 at 42). 

I noted the paper also said "the Baltimore-born actor, who died Monday of apparent asphyxiation, had spent nearly three decades on the fringes of the entertainment industry".   There was also a telephone interview in the article Divine had done just before leaving for Los Angeles to appear in "Married . . . With Children". 

Divine had begun making inroads in "mainstream" entertainment . . . and then it was over.  Just like that due to sleep apnea. 

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

I have a theory that John Gielgud helped Brando prepare his speeches. It's by far Brando's best-spoken role. Gielgud urged Brando to come to England and play Shakespeare.

Here's a quote from a letter from John Gielgud to his mother, 9 August 1952:

"Brando is a funny, intense, egocentric boy of 27, with a flat nose and bullet head, huge arms and shoulders, and yet giving the effect of a lean Greenwich Village college boy. He is very nervous indeed and mutters his lines and rehearses by himself all day long. Very deferential to me, and dragged me off to record two speeches of Antony on his machine, where he listens to his own voice and studies records of Larry, Barrymore, Maurice Evans, etc. to improve his diction. I think his sincerity may bring him to an interesting performance -- his English is not at all bad, and he is obviously very clever and ambitious. He tells me he owns a cattle ranch, and after two more years filming, will be secure financially altogether!! He belongs to a students theatre in New York and is desperately serious about acting, but I think he has very little humour and seems quite unaware of anything except the development of his own evident talents. It will be rather fun to watch him."

-- from Sir John Gielgud, A Life in Letters

 

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