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20 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Yeah, i thought i recognized the sister but maybe not?

That was Diana Lynn who was a child prodigy as a concert pianist by the age of 12.  She made her film debut playing the piano in They Shall Have Music and There's Magic In Music.  Paramount put her under contract and she supported Ginger Rogers in The Major and the Minor.  After The Miracle of Morgan's Creek she appeared in two Henry Aldrich films and two My Friend Irma films along with one of the last Martin & Lewis movies, You're Never Too Young.  During the 1950s she played Spencer Tracy's daughter in The People Against O'Hara, Ronald Reagan's leading lady in Bedtime for Bonzo and co-starred with Burt Lancaster in The Kentuckian.  After leaving Hollywood and running a travel agency in NYC for a number of years, Paramount offered her a part in Play It As It Lays, and she moved back to L.A.  Before filming began, she suffered a stroke and died in 1971 at age 45.

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1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

Speaking of reading a review or plot synopsis that gives away very important plot points in movies . . .

Years ago I bought the moody 1972 drama MY OLD MAN'S PLACE on 'PRISM Entertainment' and read the plot summary on the back of the video box before watching the movie and  I'll be darned if the box description didn't give away the end of the movie.  The dum (sic) sonsabinches who OK'ed that summary should've had their paychecks docked for a week or a month on account of 'STUPIDITY'.    Sheesh!


Spoilers in re: THE SECRET AGENT by Joseph Conrad

I picked up an edition of this book that (on the back cover) (Pretty much) summarized the story as, “a secret terrorist shopkeeper Enlists his wife’s mentally disabled brother into carrying a bomb into the London exposition.”
 

Like, literally once you know ALL THAT  there’s no gottdamned  point in reading the thing. That’s every single surprise and all 3 acts systematically unloaded on you in one poorly written paragraph. 

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And it’s been 10 or more years now, but I still get p!ssed when I remember that documentary on the EALING COMEDIES that TCM aired. 
 

For some reason that completely escapes me, the makers felt the need to systematically,  one after the other, give away the surprise ending to every. single. one. of their comedy/caper/farce films in *one single sequence,* Before you even know what’s happening!!!
 

And this was before I had seen any of them! 
 

edit- No, I had seen “kind hearts and coronets”, but that was the only one. Seriously ruined them all for me.

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11 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

That was Diana Lynn who was a child prodigy as a concert pianist by the age of 12.  She made her film debut playing the piano in They Shall Have Music and There's Magic In Music.  Paramount put her under contract and she supported Ginger Rogers in The Major and the Minor.  After The Miracle of Morgan's Creek she appeared in two Henry Aldrich films and two My Friend Irma films along with one of the last Martin & Lewis movies, You're Never Too Young.  During the 1950s she played Spencer Tracy's daughter in The People Against O'Hara, Ronald Reagan's leading lady in Bedtime for Bonzo and co-starred with Burt Lancaster in The Kentuckian.  After leaving Hollywood and running a travel agency in NYC for a number of years, Paramount offered her a part in Play It As It Lays, and she moved back to L.A.  Before filming began, she suffered a stroke and died in 1971 at age 45.

 

Thanks for all that info.  Sad ending- way too young to die of a stroke like that.

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28 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

That was Diana Lynn who was a child prodigy as a concert pianist by the age of 12.  She made her film debut playing the piano in They Shall Have Music and There's Magic In Music.  Paramount put her under contract and she supported Ginger Rogers in The Major and the Minor.  After The Miracle of Morgan's Creek she appeared in two Henry Aldrich films and two My Friend Irma films along with one of the last Martin & Lewis movies, You're Never Too Young.  During the 1950s she played Spencer Tracy's daughter in The People Against O'Hara, Ronald Reagan's leading lady in Bedtime for Bonzo and co-starred with Burt Lancaster in The Kentuckian.  After leaving Hollywood and running a travel agency in NYC for a number of years, Paramount offered her a part in Play It As It Lays, and she moved back to L.A.  Before filming began, she suffered a stroke and died in 1971 at age 45.

That's sad. I'd forgotten she died so young.

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55 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

That was Diana Lynn who was a child prodigy as a concert pianist by the age of 12.  She made her film debut playing the piano in They Shall Have Music and There's Magic In Music.  Paramount put her under contract and she supported Ginger Rogers in The Major and the Minor.  After The Miracle of Morgan's Creek she appeared in two Henry Aldrich films and two My Friend Irma films along with one of the last Martin & Lewis movies, You're Never Too Young.  During the 1950s she played Spencer Tracy's daughter in The People Against O'Hara, Ronald Reagan's leading lady in Bedtime for Bonzo and co-starred with Burt Lancaster in The Kentuckian.  After leaving Hollywood and running a travel agency in NYC for a number of years, Paramount offered her a part in Play It As It Lays, and she moved back to L.A.  Before filming began, she suffered a stroke and died in 1971 at age 45.

When I see Diana Lynn mentioned I always think of this photo, with Gail Russell, taken by Peter Stackpole in 1943 (or so says the Tumblr poster I copied this from). A case of having a camera ready at the right place and time. (Or a good fan, as the case may have been.) 

9L9eZiY.jpg

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3 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I don't remember where I post things.  But watched the Space Launch this am. and all I could thing of was Bezos and Bonzo (we did send chimps into space).  Ronald Reagan with his favorite? co-star.  

Like most on the Internet, I was reminded of Flesh Gordon (1974) for some reason...  🤔

400x225_cmsv2_d2ecd1d1-4e0a-5f34-9520-00

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I love this one, but I don't actually think it was intended to be scary at all. I see it as a BLACK COMEDY, a GOTHIC FARCE, a WHIMSICAL GRAND GUIGNOL....

Did I spell GUIGNOL right?

Whale is commonly remembered as a horror director, but he had a knack for drawing-room comedy (see 1933's By Candlelight). The genius of The Old Dark House is the ambiguity as to whether the Femms are just blithely egocentric aristocrats, or monsters.

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2 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

That was Diana Lynn who was a child prodigy as a concert pianist by the age of 12.  She made her film debut playing the piano in They Shall Have Music and There's Magic In Music.  Paramount put her under contract and she supported Ginger Rogers in The Major and the Minor.  After The Miracle of Morgan's Creek she appeared in two Henry Aldrich films and two My Friend Irma films along with one of the last Martin & Lewis movies, You're Never Too Young.  During the 1950s she played Spencer Tracy's daughter in The People Against O'Hara, Ronald Reagan's leading lady in Bedtime for Bonzo and co-starred with Burt Lancaster in The Kentuckian.  After leaving Hollywood and running a travel agency in NYC for a number of years, Paramount offered her a part in Play It As It Lays, and she moved back to L.A.  Before filming began, she suffered a stroke and died in 1971 at age 45.

She was also in a domestic melodrama (a.k.a. "woman's picture") with Lizabeth Scott called Paid in Full. TCM rarely if ever shows it. Diana is mentally unstable, and Lizabeth (her older sister) is in love with Diana's husband. It has one of those far-out plots typical of the genre.

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Just now, kingrat said:

She was also in a domestic melodrama (a.k.a. "woman's picture") with Lizabeth Scott called Paid in Full. TCM rarely if ever shows it. Diana is mentally unstable, and Lizabeth (her older sister) is in love with Diana's husband. It has one of those far-out plots typical of the genre.

Yea,   overbaked domestic melodrama that even Eve Arden couldn't make better.    

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

Like most on the Internet, I was reminded of Flesh Gordon (1974) for some reason...  🤔

400x225_cmsv2_d2ecd1d1-4e0a-5f34-9520-00

For crying' out loud. Bezo's must be hung like a Mudskipper.

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16 hours ago, kingrat said:

She was also in a domestic melodrama (a.k.a. "woman's picture") with Lizabeth Scott called Paid in Full. TCM rarely if ever shows it. Diana is mentally unstable, and Lizabeth (her older sister) is in love with Diana's husband. It has one of those far-out plots typical of the genre.

Yes, I've seen it, but not in a long time. Similar, I think, to the film Scott did with Jane Greer that I can't remember the title. Similar, due to the sappy character Scott plays in both (at least I think so, I've forgotten a lot of the plot) Would like to see this again. Was it Paramount or RKO?

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Today,  there are two ways to take this:  The poster (the one with Marilyn and someone who doesn't look like Lord Olivier) and the poster (Allhallowsday).  Nasty comment forthcoming (not against any of the posters).  The Prince and the Two-Bit Actress (referring to Megan and Harry).  

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Yes, I've seen it, but not in a long time. Similar, I think, to the film Scott did with Jane Greer that I can't remember the title. Similar, due to the sappy character Scott plays in both (at least I think so, I've forgotten a lot of the plot) Would like to see this again. Was it Paramount or RKO?

The Scott\Greer film is The Company She Keeps.    It is a drama and not really a crime\noir film.     I only point this out since I wish those two were in a gritty noir film with at least one playing a femme fatale.   

It is an RKO film,  released in 1951;  (thus TCM should be able to lease it,  unlike a Paramount film).

The Company She Keeps (1951) - IMDb

  

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LOL. Talk about a misleading poster! Yes, I couldnt remember the title, though I've seen it several times. I was asking about Paid in Full. I found it's Paramount, so that explains why TCM rarely shows it.

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13 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL (1957)

I am starting to like this movie.  I did not sit through it, but watched the beginning and end.  TCM shows it often. 

This poster is absurd :

800px-Prince_and_the_showgirl.jpg

I watched this within the last 12 months on TCM.  The poster doesn't seem to do the story any justice.  Apparently Olivier didn't like working with Monroe.  I thought there were some good scenes but overall a mediocre film.

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39 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

I watched this within the last 12 months on TCM.  The poster doesn't seem to do the story any justice.  Apparently Olivier didn't like working with Monroe.  I thought there were some good scenes but overall a mediocre film.

Agreed.  That is the film where I realized what a HAM OLIVIER was...

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The Scott\Greer film is The Company She Keeps.    It is a drama and not really a crime\noir film.     I only point this out since I wish those two were in a gritty noir film with at least one playing a femme fatale.   

It is an RKO film,  released in 1951;  (thus TCM should be able to lease it,  unlike a Paramount film).

The Company She Keeps (1951) - IMDb

  

The baby in Jane Greer's arms is none other than Jeff Bridges making his film debut.

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14 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL (1957)

I am starting to like this movie.  I did not sit through it, but watched the beginning and end.  TCM shows it often. 

This poster is absurd :

800px-Prince_and_the_showgirl.jpg

The guy looks like Yves Montand who starred with Monroe in 1960's Let's Make Love.  Another of her films I don't especially care for.

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40 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

The guy looks like Yves Montand who starred with Monroe in 1960's Let's Make Love.  Another of her films I don't especially care for.

Yves Montand- the French singer?

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49 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

The baby in Jane Greer's arms is none other than Jeff Bridges making his film debut.

OMG!!!!!!!!! He started early.

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1 hour ago, filmnoirguy said:

The baby in Jane Greer's arms is none other than Jeff Bridges making his film debut.

What "baby"?    I don't see no stinking baby!    Jeff Bridges was 2 years old in his film debut.

I only see a poster,  and that young man in the girl's arms (who I assume is  Greer),  is Dennis O'Keefe.    Here is one with Jeff.

Roles of Jeff Bridges - Album on Imgur

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2 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I watched this within the last 12 months on TCM.  The poster doesn't seem to do the story any justice.  Apparently Olivier didn't like working with Monroe.  I thought there were some good scenes but overall a mediocre film.

Nobody liked working with Marilyn Monroe, and you can't blame them. She was always late, she couldn't memorize her lines, many takes, etc. Olivier was very nice to her though, at least in the long run. When filming was done, Marilyn was seen as being very bad. Olivier told her that they could rework the scenes, if she wanted to. She assented. That was a lot of trouble for him but he did it.

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