Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

3 Women (1977); dir. Robert Altman (4/5 stars) 

*starring Shelley Duvall, Sissy Spacek, Janice Rule. 

Words are practically escaping me at the moment; I enjoyed all the performances in this and am glad to have liked yet another Altman film. I really like Janice Rule also; I think she was definitely an underrated actress (I recently saw her in "The Chase" with Brando, and Bell Book and Candle 1958). 
 

3 Women (1977) | The Criterion Collection

The Twilight Zone on Twitter: "Janice Rule, whose character in Twilight  Zone's "Nightmare as a Child" had repressed memories of a murder, later  earned a Ph.D in psychoanalysis. #ZoneFacts #S1E29… https://t.co/sixLHOZWfv"

^^Here is a still of Rule in the Twilight Zone episode entitled "Nightmare as a Child." ^^ 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/23/2021 at 8:46 AM, Moe Howard said:

The Searchers has to be the most beautifully shot film. Too bad it's gotten all this stink on it, usually from well intentioned types who haven't looked deeply enough into those problematic topics

One need not look too deeply for some problematic topics, like John Wayne, for instance. One need not look to deep at all. He's right there in front of us.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

THE  MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH  Original version,  1934

First  I want to say that I really like the more famous version of this story, the 1956 remake starring James Stewart and Doris Day.  Who wouldn't? But this write-up is about the original Man Who Knew Too Much, made 22 years earlier.

Of course both versions are made by the same director,  Alfred Hitchcock, and it's interesting to ponder why he decided to make the film again.  I'm not sure he ever did this with any other movie he made.

The 1934 version is undeservedly much less famous than its 1956 successor. But it deserves to be better-known. It's very good in its own right. It's very quirky, it's suspenseful and actually quite funny -- funnier than the remake.  

For one thing,  it's got a lot of odd little details,  such as the main character attaching the knitting needles of a scarf his wife is knitting to the man she's dancing with.  We see the scarf gradually unravelling as the couple dances.  It's a beautiful combination of suspense and humour.     SPOILER    At first we laugh,  seeing the woman's dance partner move around the floor as the knitting threads snarl around him and others on the floor.  ( The husband is mildly jealous of his wife's dance partner, and wants to thwart the mood between his wife and this upstart dancer.)  But then something quite unexpected, and not funny at all happens:  the dance partner is shot.  It happens so unspectacularly, so quietly, nobody even notices at first.  So Hitchcock takes us from laughing to gasping in about five minutes.

That's just one example of the memorable scenes in this film.  Another one is the dentist's office where the father of the kidnapped child  ( in this version a young  adolescent girl,  not a little boy) and his friend go to seek the daughter, based on a clue the father's found.  It's so bizarre !  The dentist's business features an enormous set of teeth displayed over the door of his office. There's something surreal about the thing.  And when the father (played by a British actor called Leslie Banks)  submits to a dental exam by the dentist  (who's also clearly working for the bad guys who kidnapped his daughter),  you don't know whether to laugh or cringe as the dentist tries to subdue him with dentist's gas  ( was it called "laughing gas" back then?) and the father overpowers him and ends up giving the sleeping gas to the dentist.

Another memorable setting is the crazy "church" where the girl is being held by the kidnappers-- It's called "the Tabernacle of the Seventh Sun" or something nutty like that.  It's a really funny scene,  funny and at the same time very dramatic.  There's a bit where the hero tries to leave,  only to be detained by some old biddy who sticks a gun in his back.  It's so incongruous,  this chubby old lady,  surely a washer woman or something like that in her everyday life,  threatening this man with a gun.  

But possibly the best part of the 1934 Man Who Knew Too Much is the always watchable Peter Lorre as the head villain.  He's so silky smooooth, he's always smiling and being polite to the hero  (who at some point is taken prisoner), offering him cigars and celery  (yes !  there's a jar of celery sticks in the room where the hero's being detained,  and he  (the hero) keeps crunching away on them !)  Lorre sports a peculiar hairdo, there's a skunk-like white streak running through it.  He achieves a perfect combination of weary sophistication and false solicitude for the man and his daughter,   and ruthless determination and cruelty.

Anyway,  I enjoy this earlier version of The Man Who Knew Too Much at least as much as the more famous 1956 remake,  and in some ways, more. It's just quirkier and funnier. You can really see where Hitchcock's going by this time in this film.

I actually really like just about all of Hitchcock's British era movies.  I think they deserve to be more well-known.  And The Man Who Knew Too Much is a great example why.

  • Like 11
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never liked the '56 version of THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH in comparison with the meagre-budgeted '34 original.  What Hitchcock was able to do in 75 minutes in 1934 took 120 minutes in 1956 and, to me, was unnecessarily l-o-n-g.  I could understand the 1956 version being longer than 1 hr 15m; I don't know of any major studio films in '56 that were so short . . . but 90-95 minutes would have been quite enough.  Instead, it's 2 hours and it drags in Albert Hall not to mention the kid isn't all that interesting.  It was a girl in the '34 and a boy in the '56 and the girl was more interesting.  I actually cared that she was rescued.   → Plus, that song -- you KNOW the one -- didn't clutter up the proceedings in 1934 like it did in '56.  That a definite +plus+ for the low-budget original not having that infernal song as part of the plot.  To my mind, ANY technical shortcomings in '34 are negated by not having to pay heed to "Que Sera Sera".  And, besides, with Peter Lorre as the main villain in the earlier version it's much more fun to watch. 

'nuff said. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

Violating the director's artistic visions??? RELEASE THE BUTT CUT!

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/23/2021 at 10:32 PM, Mr. Gorman said:

In regards to EL DORADO I view it as "Rio Bravo With Older People"; the stars are now older and less mobile!  I like EL DORADO better than RIO BRAVO.  (I think Charlene Holt was only 21 years younger than John Wayne, tho, and not 31). 

I like THE WAR WAGON, too, but I only watch it on my 1983-issue VHS tape.  It's not in W/S, as you'd expect, but I don't need Hi•Def to watch a 1967 Western and see all the shortcomings in regards to the 'backgrounds'.  I'm surprised at how well that old tape plays.  → Even has the 'Visit Universal Studios' promo at the end with the picture of the old-time tram car.  If anyone reading this has watched old MCA or MCA/Universal tapes you'll know the promo I'm referring to. 

(ALSO:  Note there are no Kirk Buns on display on the 1st VHS release of "War Wagon".  You can tell where you'd see the 'Kirk Buns' on display but the scene cuts out right as Kirk is walking away sans robe). 

 

According to IMDB Wayne was born in May 1907 while Charlene came along in April, 1938.

So Kirk's butt shot was cut off even back in VHS days, was it? I was surprised that they were missing from the War Wagon DVD, not only because plenty of men's buns appear on DVDs but it spoiled a funny visual joke. Perhaps the edited version of War Wagon is the only one that exists today thus that is the print they had to go with when the DVD was produced. It's been a long time since I saw the film at the show in 1967 but, for the historical record, I don't believe either of Kirk's cheeks had a dimple in them.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought Charlene Holt was born in 1928.  That's the reference to her I saw on 'glamourgirlsofthesilverscreen.com'.   I reckon it was '38 after all.  Although I think the best way to be sure is to find out what year she graduated high school. 

ALSO:  In regards to "The War Wagon" I reckon it's entirely possible the version of the movie featuring 'Kirk Buns' may no longer exist.  Or maybe it's buried in a salt mine somewhere.  Buns from anyone were not allowed on U.S. television at the time "The War Wagon" would have premiered on TV so I'll guess Universal didn't duplicate the print with Kirk Buns after its theatrical run.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of comments on the above.  3 Women was an excellent film and I just looked up Janice Rule's acting husband (Ben Gazarra).

I prefer the original Man Who Knew Too Much - Doris Day seemed miscast - didn't see any chemistry between her and James Stewart (and she kept singing Que Sera Que Sera).

As for what I watched last night and this a.m...

On Demand (HBO) watched (fell asleep during part of) Broadcast News.  Three leads (Holly Hunter, Albert Brooks and John Hurt) are all great.    If you haven't seen the film (slight spoiler)... you see the three as youngsters.  Hurt, as a boy, has looks but is fairly stupid.  Brooks, as he graduates high school gets beat up but yells that the bullies will never make more than $19,000 a year (which the bullies think is great).  Holly Hunter seems to be raised by a single parent (her Dad).  She uses complicated words as she types away.  At one point she screams because her father says something (then she uses the esoteric word he uses).  As she grows up, she always has these cathartic cries.  James Brooks directed and it is an excellent story about broadcast news, newspapers, cutting costs by firing individuals, and love triangles.  Hurt becomes a sportscaster who later becomes a news anchor.  Brooks and Hunter are great friends but he has a wealth of knowledge in his head that continually amazes her.  One of the many reasons I like this movie is because Hunter is not a quintessential beauty (unlike Lois Chiles). Hurt is dependent on Hunter to mentor him, while Brooks gets off some great jokes at Hurt's expense.  I woke up in time to see the ending and one of the reasons I admire Brooks is because he doesn't go for the conventional.

This morning I watched CBS this morning.  Lots of great stories and a fairly decent interview with Geena Davis (she won her Oscar for being in a movie with one of the stars of Broadcast News and with both stars of Body Heat - William Hurt (both movies) and Kathleen Turner).  Saw the movie.  But maybe Davis (who looked like she had some work done) should take a job on a TV series instead of whining about no more roles for aging women.  She had her own show years ago.  And I thought the end of Thelma and Louise was a cop out.

Tonight, the only thing I will try to watch is B&W episodes of the Dick Van Dyke Show.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Don't forget her role in the final Matt Helm film, The Ambushers.. 

The+Ambushers+473.jpg

I was reading online that Janice Rule was initially supposed to be in "On the Waterfront" with Brando, but didn't due to not wanting to split her time between the stage play she was currently in and filming of the movie. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Carnage (2011)  Ouch! Okay, maybe not that bad. But not that good either. Excellent credentials. Kate Winslet, Christopher Waltz (The Inglorious Basterds), Jode Foster, John C Reilly, and directed by Roman Polanski. Welcome to a Bickerfest. A four-pronged ensemble piece, and excellent for an actor to really show his/her stuff. There is a game being played here, a game that might be called The George and Martha game. A conversation that incrementally becomes the more fever pitched. Not all of it works. There are wince-able  moments that that are palpably felt. Jodie Foster has the biggest challenge and she is not all the time up to it. Eve Kate has a bad moment or two. The guys have it easier, especially Christopher who is the most mild-mannered but who can still speak a dagger once in a while and who is excellent with talking on a cell phone ;---). I don’t know John C Reilly that well but he might be the best of the bunch. I don’t mean to disparage these fine actors. But this is difficult material, especially considering the interaction of the group, the ensemble aspect. My feeling is that this would be best done by super-skilled, highly trained, actors of the theater and who do theater more or less exclusively. This is really their forte. The script might be a bit at fault here as well. I’m much less of a judge of that, it’s just a feeling. Some false notes IMO. If anyone should ever rewrite it, please give us an ending.

//

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Your Past is Showing 1957

It's a British black comedy film starring Terry-Thomas, Peter Sellers, Dennis Price. Peggy Mount, and Shirley Eaton. 

10598733%5D&call=url%5Bfile:product.chai

Price plays the publisher of a scandal rag called The Naked Truth (which is the alternate British title of the film) who is blackmailing half of London. Thomas, Sellers, Mount, and Eaton have had enough and after a series missteps join forces to rid the world of Price. 

The comedy is very British and if you like the style, very funny. Everyone is very good but Sellers is at his best as the host of a variety show geared toward geriatrics. And it's free on Youtube.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Gene Tierney stars in Dragonwyck (1946)

Dragonwyck (1946) TCM 6/10

A wealthy land owner (Vincent Price) invites a distant cousin (Gene Tierney) to be governess to his daughter.

I had seen this years ago but had mostly forgotten it. It was a good Gothic melodrama, sort of a small scale Rebecca. Price fans (like myself) will enjoy it, even though it doesn't really get interesting until the final half hour. Price is excellent and this seems like a warm up for his Poe films of the 1960s. Tierney is good as always as the naïve farm girl who at first loves living in the beautiful mansion but soon sinister things start to happen. Good supporting cast with Walter Huston as Tierney's strict religious father, Jessica Tandy as lame Irish maid and Harry Morgan as an angry farmer. One thing I was puzzled about was the abrupt disappearance of Price's daughter, I don't believe it was ever explained, does anyone know for sure?

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/24/2021 at 10:38 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

3 Women (1977); dir. Robert Altman (4/5 stars) 

*starring Shelley Duvall, Sissy Spacek, Janice Rule. 

Words are practically escaping me at the moment; I enjoyed all the performances in this and am glad to have liked yet another Altman film.
 

I always feel the same way when I like an ALTMAN FILM.

I say this because as a director, he has a real "peaks and valleys" type of output- at the high end are THE LONG GOODBYE, BREWSTER McCLOUD, THE PLAYER, and GOSFORD PARK and on the low FOOL FOR LOVE, READY TO WEAR, NASHVILLE and I remember really not liking M*A*S*H* but it's been 30 years since i saw it.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

NIGHTMARE IN CHICAGO (1964-Tvm) is a pretty good early Altman film.  I don't know how readily available it is to watch . . . but I used to have a VHS tape of it.  Not a 'legal' video release -- someone had made a copy from a grainy old television airing and sent a tape to me.  I watched it once and enjoyed it.  Then I managed to store the tape in a damp place and it got mouldy.  I should've known better; very stupid of me.  But at least I got to watch it.  A far cry from his later films, to be sure.  Runs 80 minutes. 

I do like Robert Altman's 1978 ensemble comedy/drama "A WEDDING" even tho it is admittedly not a great movie.  But I've seen it 4 times.  (I've not seen "Nashville" before, btw).  

NIGHTMARE IN CHICAGO is a wintry movie that takes place in Illinois just before Christmas.  Police hunt a killer who has been nicknamed "Georgie Porgie" and who preys on blondes.   How to stop him before he kills again? 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

 (I've not seen "Nashville" before, btw).  

 

THANK YOU FOR ALL THE INFO!

Not too long ago, I purchased a copy of 5001 NIGHTS AT THE MOVIES by PAULINE KAEL wherein she looses her s*** over NASHVILLE to SUCH a degree that I BOUGHT IT FOR $7.99 on AMAZON PRIME because renting was not an option.

while there are some things I liked, and it was worth seeing for the cars, [some of] the actors, and the POWERFUL 1970sness of it, it is a condescending, ELITIST, downright RUDE film, the music sucks and the line "THIS AIN'T DALLAS! THIS IS NASHVILLE" is one of the 10 WORST in the HISTORY OF CINEMA.

also LILY TOMLIN is no great shakes in it, nor is RONEE BLAKELY.

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saw Hot Summer Nights and at the very end in the crowd scene snapped a pic of this actress-was this Shirley MacLaine? Seems odd she would appear in a B picture in 1957. 

ECA9CC70-C88E-4222-8582-BD51A369DA38.jpeg

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Paul M said:

Just saw Hot Summer Nights and at the very end in the crowd scene snapped a pic of this actress-was this Shirley MacLaine? Seems odd she would appear in a B picture in 1957. 

ECA9CC70-C88E-4222-8582-BD51A369DA38.jpeg

Definitely not MacLaine...but sure looks just like her! Nice Sony set there Mr.M.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, among other things, watched Guarding Tess (that was Shirley MacClaine).  Nicholas Cage and supporting cast did a pretty good job.  Started to watch Dragonwyck, but got bored quickly (even though I've seen it before).  Watched the end of an old Carol Burnett Show with Steve Lawrence playing a Lt. Columbo type figure.  It led into the 2 Dick Van Dyke shows I watched.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/24/2021 at 7:52 PM, laffite said:

One need not look too deeply for some problematic topics, like John Wayne, for instance. One need not look to deep at all. He's right there in front of us.

Why's Wayne problematic?  Or The Searchers? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

From the weekend:

Cutter's Way (1981) Thought it was alright, but i was getting tired of listening to John Heard's schtick.  Was nice to see him in a leading role though.

Woodstock 99 documentary (2021) Liked it, although i heard way too many stereotypical comments made about white males.  But it is an HBO film.  Othrewise it is tough to believe that there was a time that Limp Bizkit was the biggest band in the world. As someone who has been to Glastonbury and Coachella multiple times, it isn't that hard to have a large music festival without it turning into chaos.  The people who ran the three Woodstock events never quite figured it out.  Even the original one which people hold in legendary stature, was declared a national disaster.

Cause for Alarm! (1951) Thought it was kind of silly.  And I agree with some of the other comments i saw and don't see how this is noir.

Night Moves (1975) Liked it.  James Woods wasn't very attractive in his youth, was he. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/25/2021 at 11:24 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

A couple of comments on the above.  3 Women was an excellent film and I just looked up Janice Rule's acting husband (Ben Gazarra).

I prefer the original Man Who Knew Too Much - Doris Day seemed miscast - didn't see any chemistry between her and James Stewart (and she kept singing Que Sera Que Sera).

As for what I watched last night and this a.m...

On Demand (HBO) watched (fell asleep during part of) Broadcast News.  Three leads (Holly Hunter, Albert Brooks and John Hurt) are all great.    If you haven't seen the film (slight spoiler)... you see the three as youngsters.  Hurt, as a boy, has looks but is fairly stupid.  Brooks, as he graduates high school gets beat up but yells that the bullies will never make more than $19,000 a year (which the bullies think is great).  Holly Hunter seems to be raised by a single parent (her Dad).  She uses complicated words as she types away.  At one point she screams because her father says something (then she uses the esoteric word he uses).  As she grows up, she always has these cathartic cries.  James Brooks directed and it is an excellent story about broadcast news, newspapers, cutting costs by firing individuals, and love triangles.  Hurt becomes a sportscaster who later becomes a news anchor.  Brooks and Hunter are great friends but he has a wealth of knowledge in his head that continually amazes her.  One of the many reasons I like this movie is because Hunter is not a quintessential beauty (unlike Lois Chiles). Hurt is dependent on Hunter to mentor him, while Brooks gets off some great jokes at Hurt's expense.  I woke up in time to see the ending and one of the reasons I admire Brooks is because he doesn't go for the conventional.

This morning I watched CBS this morning.  Lots of great stories and a fairly decent interview with Geena Davis (she won her Oscar for being in a movie with one of the stars of Broadcast News and with both stars of Body Heat - William Hurt (both movies) and Kathleen Turner).  Saw the movie.  But maybe Davis (who looked like she had some work done) should take a job on a TV series instead of whining about no more roles for aging women.  She had her own show years ago.  And I thought the end of Thelma and Louise was a cop out.

Tonight, the only thing I will try to watch is B&W episodes of the Dick Van Dyke Show.

Okay, I believe you did correct yourself.  It was not John Hurt but William Hurt who starred in Broadcast News.  Of the three leads, I think Albert Brooks was robbed of a Supporting Oscar win.  And, of course, Geena Davis won her Supporting Oscar for another favorite of mine, The Accidental Tourist.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The 1971 Playboy interview is viewed by some as problematic.

 

I never read it but i think i've heard the gist.  I take exception with it but i don't agree with cancelling someone's career for a single quote in an interview when they're no longer around to defend themselves.  I know some people hold him up with high regard as an icon for America.  I just think he was in a lot of great Westerns and i enjoy his movies and don't give him much else thought.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Definitely not MacLaine...but sure looks just like her! Nice Sony set there Mr.M.

Thanks. Could have been her double. Wonder who she was. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...