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11 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I've seen a still of topless Babs online.  There was nothing out-of-the-ordinary about her upper frontals.  They looked quite nice to me even with the blurry still I saw.  Remember those stills were published in an adult-themed magazine some 9 or 10 years later so the photos of her topless didn't disappear.      

She sued that magazine.  Don't remember the outcome of the lawsuit, though.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

I thought Washington's in-your-face villainy was very effective, a total scoundrel. He must have enjoyed playing a bad guy, for a change. Is this his only villain role? Oh, wait there was also American Gangster.

I've seen most of Denzel's big films but one I particularly enjoy was relatively early in his career, Devil in a Blue Dress, a neo noir told from a 1948 African American perspective. Don Cheadle's psycho gunman stole every scene he was in but Denzel is winning as Easy Rawlins. I wish there could have been a series of Easy Rawlins films with Washington.

It's quite  a contrast in characterizations by this terrific actor, Easy as opposed to the corrupt scumbag cop in Training Day.

Devil in a Blue Dress (1995) - IMDb

I saw this on TCM and enjoyed it. Not great, but worth seeing.

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Juggernaut (1974)

 

A transatlantic cruise which promises to be somewhat boring because bad weather is limiting passengers' activities is enlivened by the discovery of bombs capable of blowing a series of lovely large holes below the waterline.

Star-studded movies are often not considered great viewing because the storyline is fragmented so that each star has a semi-significant role. That is certainly true here because: Richard Harris, Omar Sharif, David Hemmings, Anthony Hopkins, Shirley Knight and Ian Holm each have 'important' scenes with supporting actors. 

I found nothing wrong with this movie. I found little right with it. I checked several different ways but I am still not totally convinced that this was not a made-for-television movie. I support many forms of diversity but the choppy jumps from scene-to-scene of: fear, ennui, lust and erraticism is more random than I can handle. I love most of the actors but this director did not bring out more than a mediocre performance from any of them. The fact that the producer and original writer petitioned to have his name removed from the final product tells all that you need to know.

I believe that this movie would be perfect for people who like thrillers to plod along with many extraneous distractions so that their blood pressure is not raised by any excitement.

4/11.8

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Mr. Gorman said:

I've seen a still of topless Babs online.  There was nothing out-of-the-ordinary about her upper frontals.  They looked quite nice to me even with the blurry still I saw.  Remember those stills were published in an adult-themed magazine some 9 or 10 years later so the photos of her topless didn't disappear.

 

2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

She sued that magazine.  Don't remember the outcome of the lawsuit, though.

 

It was thrown out of court, and with the presiding judge declaring that there were no visible means of support shown to her allegations.

(...don't ya just love these old jokes...I think this one might've belonged to Joan Rivers) 

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On 8/13/2021 at 12:03 AM, 37kitties said:

Wow, Vivian Leigh was so much more beautiful then than she would be just 10 years later (in Streetcar).

Agreed that she looked stunning in That Hamilton Woman--but keep in mind that her hair and makeup in Streetcar were deliberately chosen to make her appear like a middle-aged woman trying too hard (i.e. unsuccessfully) to disguise her true age.  In fact, as a pale echo of the raven-haired beauty we all remembered from earlier films:

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For comparison, here she is onstage two years later in The Sleeping Prince (1953):

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5 hours ago, Fedya said:

Also, if somebody says s'il vous plaît, the correct response is "Et s'il me ne plaît pas?"

It is one of many responses. The one you indicate is rather edgy and perhaps contentious. What are you trying to do, pick a fight? :lol:

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I have seen American Gangster upon release,I did not like it at  all, A  big gangster organization with no visible staff, it was very bad, Ness with no colleages.I like Washington early roles,i.e Carbon Copy and several others-early ones.He is having the De Niro syndrome for several years. American Gangster is the last film i have seen by him and lost all interest in his career.

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Jenny (1970)

Jenny_FilmPoster.jpeg

Directed by George Broomfield

Starring Marlo Thomas, Alan Alda, Marian Hailey, Vincent Gardenia, Elizabeth Wilson, Charlotte Rae, Philip Bruns, Florence Stanley

Released by ABC Pictures/Cinerama Corp.

Jfinu5zh9rKzWSHvGp5bfw64752.jpeg

Source: DVD

As it stands, this was likely the first movie released in the 1970s. [January 2, 1970, to be exact]. It's an odd little film in a way, with a traditional old-fashioned story at the center. Marlo Thomas plays Jenny, a young unmarried woman who is 6 months pregnant following an absent minded encounter with a childhood friend at a screening of A Place in the Sun. Ashamed, she takes off for New York , and bumps into a young filmmaker, played by Alan Alda, who is trying to dodge the Vietnam draft. They become friends and  ultimately decide to enter into a marriage of convenience, to offer her baby a name, and him a potential opportunity not to go to Vietnam. But, as such things usually happen in such films, she falls in love with him, before he falls for her. One of their aims is successful, the other isn't. It's a very simple story, and the film is odd because at 88 minutes, it feels more like an extended short story than a real film. All the characters speak so slowly and there are long pauses to kind of extend the runtime to feature length (several montages, and a weirdly sexualized breastfeeding sequence when the baby arrives for its first meal also cause it to be extended). It feels more like an art film, in both pacing and quietness,  albeit with big name TV stars, than a major studio film. I'm a bit mixed. Marlo Thomas is softly charming here, lightyears away from her famous That Girl characterization, but Alda comes across as a bit of a jerk at many times. A line of Vincent Gardenia's regarding Hitler and the Soviets is jaw-droppingly inappropriate, implying that the Germans should have won the whole war! [shiver] Nice song by Harry Niellson on the soundtrack. Worth a look if you are a Marlo Thomas fan, like me, otherwise, its your call.

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8 hours ago, Hibi said:

I saw this on TCM and enjoyed it. Not great, but worth seeing.

I have many favorite Denzel movies. PHILADELPHIA. THE PELICAN BRIEF, MALCOM X and THE BONE COLLECTOR just to name a few. However, MAN ON FIRE stands out as probably my number one. At the ripe old age of 71 the song "Smiling" from that movie actually brings a tear to my eye.  

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On 8/10/2021 at 11:47 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Blessings to you and your newborn.    Cheers.

Thanks and to the others as well.  Baby is home and doing better but still losing weight after being used to feeding tubes and being reluctant to feedings, but he's a sweetie.  Can't wait to introduce him to Buster KEaton films like i did with my other young guy.

Watched First Man into Space (1959) with him sleeping on my chest yesterday.  Enjoyed it but obviously kind of silly- kind of retro sci-fi films i like. (the first film i watched with my oldest son was Lone Wolf and Cub pt. 6 and i remember my mother-in-law giving me funny looks.)

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7 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Watched First Man into Space (1959) with him sleeping on my chest yesterday. 

Aw that sounds like a perfect way to watch a movie. Congratulations!

Yesterday was my first day at Capitolfest- honoring Constance & Joan Bennett. First movie watched was 1932's THE TRIAL OF VIVIENNE WARE starring Joan & Donald Cook. This was a fun murder mystery with Joan on trial for murdering a rich guy. Typical story of girl wooed away from normal nice guy by rich older man. She finds him at home with another woman & he's killed. Real story unfolds in flashbacks during the trial. A well told tale with funny interludes of "radio commentary" by Skeets Gallagher & Zazu Pitts since the public couldn't follow the dailies of the trial on TV.

Joan was stunningly beautiful as was her nightclub rival played by Lillian Bond. This one holds up very well.

Followed by MADAM SPY a 1942 Universal, which garnered applause at the plane/world logo. This one had Constance playing a charactor named Joan (confusing!) and her whirlwind marriage to Don Porter who is a War Correspondent. We see Connie meeting & trading secrets with Nazis, often info gathered from her unsuspecting husband. This movie rests on his adventure of finding her out while she continues her secret meetings. The high point of this movie is Edward S Brophy as the husband's taxi driver, who always has a wise cracking thing to bring a lighthearted chuckle.

I disliked this movie a lot because once the husband corners her, we find out she's a DOUBLE agent really working for the US. BOO!

The next movie starred fave Alice White in Show Girl 1928. Alice White was GORGEOUS and I loved this movie, the first where she plays Dixie Dugan a charactor later developed as a comic strip. I wasn't fond of the recorded soundtrack for this silent, which included White singing recordings used for the stage numbers.

Then a silly Joe Cook short was shown, the audience went wild "YEA!"

The morning theme of "poor depression girls seeking fortune through marriage" rounded off with Joan Bennett in SHE WANTED A MILLIONAIRE, a 1932 gem. Apparently, this movie was made based on a true story. Similar circumstances of the lead charactor choosing a rich older man over young cutie played by Spencer Tracey. But in this one she's a beauty contestant & we see her in bathing suits as well as gorgeous dresses. Una Merkel plays her friend & personal secretary-she's a favorite of mine & MrTiki fell under her spell as well seeing her for the first time. There is romance, intrigue, mystery & fun in this movie and the principle actors give solid, entertaining performances as always.

Oops gotta go!

POSTER-ON-SCHEDULE-PAGE-r01.jpg

 

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On 8/12/2021 at 4:28 PM, TikiSoo said:

Way back in 2012, someone wrote this post. I've kept it as a quote all these years-LOL

Really, Dark Shadows as a comedy? For effin real? What about Dark Shadows struck you as being funny, Tim Burton? Like "hah-hah" funny? Did Mars Attacks! teach you nothing, Tim Burton?
 
I hate you, Tim Burton.

I actually enjoyed Tim Burton's DARK SHADOWS movie from 2012 with Johnny  Depp as Barnabas Collins and the wonderful  Michelle Pfeiffer as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard.

I think it worked as a comedy because it was done as a 1970s period piece. One of my favorite parts is the montage that is underscored by The Carpenters' "Top Of  The World." I especially love Barnabas's reaction to Karen Carpenter singing on television:  "What sorcery is this? Reveal yourself, tiny songstress!" 

And the sex scene with Barnabas and Angelique is hilarious! . . .and also kinda hot . . .

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41 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I actually enjoyed Tim Burton's DARK SHADOWS movie from 2012 with Johnny  Depp as Barnabas Collins and the wonderful  Michelle Pfeiffer as Elizabeth Collins Stoddard.

I think it worked as a comedy because it was done as a 1970s period piece. One of my favorite parts is the montage that is underscored by The Carpenters' "Top Of  The World." I especially love Barnabas's reaction to Karen Carpenter singing on television:  "What sorcery is this? Reveal yourself, tiny songstress!" 

And the sex scene with Barnabas and Angelique is hilarious! . . .and also kinda hot . . .

Well, you have to have a sense of humor - and you do.

I guess maybe some have less of one.

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On 8/13/2021 at 4:45 PM, nakano said:

I have seen American Gangster upon release,I did not like it at  all, A  big gangster organization with no visible staff, it was very bad, Ness with no colleages.I like Washington early roles,i.e Carbon Copy and several others-early ones.He is having the De Niro syndrome for several years. American Gangster is the last film i have seen by him and lost all interest in his career.

Sorry you didn't like AMERICAN GANGSTER, I found it to be a very excellent film. Denzel was great as always as was Russell Crowe. 

My only gripe is that there wasn't more scenes between their characters in the movie.

I wouldn't write off Denzel off as of yet. If you didn't like AMERICAN GANGSTER, you might want to check out FLIGHT, FENCES, THE GREAT DEBATERS. He turns in really fine work in these films.

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Film Poster for The Sterile Cuckoo.jpg

The Sterile Cuckoo (1969) DVD 8/10

A kooky girl (Liza Minnelli) falls for a shy straight arrow student (Wendell Burton) while at college for the first time.

There is a lot to enjoy in this one. Minnelli gives her best performance by far in this one, she is funny, quirky and very touching. She was nominated for her first Oscar, if Maggie Smith had not been around that year, Liza should have won it. This is very effective look at young love in all it's awkwardness and heartbreak. It was beautifully filmed on location in Clinton, NY with many great Autumn scenes. I also love the wistful song "Come Saturday Morning" sung by The Sandpipers.

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Claudelle Inglish (1961).

Arthur Kennedy and Constance Ford, having been jilted by their respective spouses in A Summer Place, go south to become tenant farmers and raise daughter Claudelle (Diane McBain).  Fellow child of a tenant farmer Chad Everett falls in love with Claudelle and asks for her hand in marriage, said marriage to take place after Chad finishes his hitch in the Army.  But in the Army, he falls in love with another girl and dumps Claudelle, who decides she going to date pretty much every man in the county.

Well, every man with the exception of the family's landlord Crawford (Claude Akins), who watches Baby Doll halfway through the movie and suddenly decides asking to marry barely legal Claudelle would be a tremendous idea.  The movie gets more ridiculous from there.

There's something about late 1950s/early 1960s potboilers that makes them incredibly fun, with the fun being in direct proportion to how bad the movie is.  Claudelle Inglish is pretty fun in that regard, although there are ways it could have been worse (and therefore more fun).  First, it should have been in garish color instead of black and white, and I mean garish in a Torch Song way, not just a color film.  Second, Claudelle should have gotten pregnant by one of her partners, bringing an extra level of ridiculousness seen in films like Susan Slade or The Best of Everything.

7/10 if you want an enjoyably bad movie; 4/10 if you're judging on a more objective basis.

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I saw most of The VIPs on Margaret Rutherford day. This was retro even in 1963--it's basically Grand Hotel in an airport--but well-made. Terence Rattigan's script construction is old-fashioned and predictable, but he understands how to get the most value out of dramatically familiar situations, like the subplot about the boss who doesn't appreciate the quietly efficient secretary who's in love with him. Of course, having Rod Taylor and Maggie Smith in those roles helps a lot! I found Orson Welles' scenes to be fast-forward material, but otherwise the cast, the views of London Heathrow Airport, and Elizabeth Taylor's fur coat and cap held my attention.

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