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I'm not a fan of the cookie-cutter Elvis movies with ludicrous plots and forgettable music, but Loving You, 1957,  is an early exception to that formula.  Elvis is very young (21) and basically plays himself and how he got started.   His name here is "Deke Rivers",  a local delivery truck driver who sings and plays a little guitar on the side.  One of my favorite noir dames, Lizabeth Scott, is the manager for Wendell Corey's country band.  Whenever "Deke" sits in, the girls go nuts for his singing, dance moves, and animal magnetism, which she's quick to exploit, booking them into smaller venues all over and building a fan base.   When town councils try to ban Deke as obscene, Liz fights for rock 'n roll as a 1st amendment issue.

Songs include Loving You, Teddy Bear, Hot Dog, Mean Woman Blues, etc.

elvis2.jpg.4cfbc90e242394e890c4dd6ef73e910d.jpg

 

 

 

Sadly Liz lost her lawsuit against Confidential magazine for outing her as gay and turned her back on Hollywood after this film.

Dolores Hart would quit Hollywood as well by joining a convent.

Wendell Corey became a raging alcoholic and died of a pickled liver at 54.

Gladys Presley (an extra) would be dead in couple of years.

Elvis would be dead on his bathroom floor at 42.

 

I guess celebrity isn't always what it's cracked up to be.

 

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1 hour ago, King Rat said:

I saw most of The VIPs on Margaret Rutherford day. This was retro even in 1963--it's basically Grand Hotel in an airport--but well-made. Terence Rattigan's script construction is old-fashioned and predictable, but he understands how to get the most value out of dramatically familiar situations, like the subplot about the boss who doesn't appreciate the quietly efficient secretary who's in love with him. Of course, having Rod Taylor and Maggie Smith in those roles helps a lot! I found Orson Welles' scenes to be fast-forward material, but otherwise the cast, the views of London Heathrow Airport, and Elizabeth Taylor's fur coat and cap held my attention.

THE V.I.P.s is a dumb movie... was ORSON WELLES in need of a paycheck to play Max Buda...  Yes.  "Max Buda"... yuk yuk .  I think it was a big financial success.  LOUIS JORDAN as Mark Champselle (what was that?  what was that noise...?) goes into the "mod" room nodding his head approvingly..."very nice...very nice..."

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10 hours ago, Katie_G said:

I'm not a fan of the cookie-cutter Elvis movies with ludicrous plots and forgettable music, but Loving You, 1957,  is an early exception to that formula. 

Thanks for that succinct observation. I enjoyed your impressions of the movie but the personal info wasn't really necessary.

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11 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

was ORSON WELLES in need of a paycheck to play Max Buda...  Yes.

Obviously looking to fund one of his other projects as a director.  The TrialChimes at Midnight?

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I find THE V.I.P.S watchable, though certainly not up there with WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINA WOOLF? I admit.

Margaret Rutherford was the best thing about the movie for me, but I have to confess I don't think it was an Oscar worthy performance.  

Orson's scenes bore me as well. But Rod Taylor did make good eye candy.

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I think Margaret Rutherford's best performance is in Blithe Spirit as the psychic/medium.

Didn't realize the film was based on Vivian Leigh trying to leave Olivier for Peter Finch?

Last night, aside from two very funny Dick Van Dyke episode (especially the one where he winds up at a party in Redhood, NJ and thinks he is a character named Antonio Stradivarius), used TCM on Demand to catch up with two George Segal Films:  Fun with Dick and Jane (He had good chemistry with Jane Fonda - and it is much funnier than the remake - plus Ed McMahon as the bad guy is a plus).  Alicia Malone gave such a lovely speech about how wonderful a person Segal was that I realized how much I am saddened that he was no longer with us.  After that, watched The Owl and the Pussycat.  Does anyone know how Streisand and George Segal got along.  I found her character very annoying and Segal is lucky her super-long nails didn't scratch his eyes/face.

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I watched Lightning Strikes Twice (1951),  last night on MOVIES-TV Sunday night noir.    More of a drama than a noir,  this Ruth Roman \ Richard Todd film also cast the crazy good at being crazy Mercedes McCambridge.   

SPOILER ALERT:

The film has Darryl Hickman as Mercedes younger brother.     This guy appears to have issue with his relatives.    If it isn't a sister-in-law in Leave Her to Heaven its his own sister in Lightning Strikes Twice!

Lightning Strikes Twice (1951) | OldMoviesaregreat

 

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The film has Darryl Hickman as Mercedes younger brother.     This guy appears to have issue with his relatives.    If it isn't a sister-in-law in Leave Her to Heaven its it own sister in Lightning Strikes Twice!

I haven't seen that, though you're right, MERCEDES is good at crazy... her specialty! 

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8 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Thanks for that succinct observation. I enjoyed your impressions of the movie but the personal info wasn't really necessary.

Thanks for your comments.  I don't know if TCM has ever showed Loving You, but since they include personal info on just about every film they air, I may have learned some of that from them and thought it was appropriate if not expected.

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8 minutes ago, Katie_G said:

Thanks for your comments.  I don't know if TCM has ever showed Loving You, but since they include personal info on just about every film they air, I may have learned some of that from them and thought it was appropriate if not expected.

I like learning the "whatever happened to ..." information about people. You just happened to have found yourself with a group that included sadder ends than most. The director, I discovered, lived to be 92! So that's something positive.

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As usual, I'm enjoying Summer Under The Stars.  Even if I don't find a particular actor or actress appealing to me, I can usually find a film or two of theirs that I enjoy because of the co-stars or a particular scene in one of their movies.  I was happy to catch "Moby Dick" on Gregory Peck's day.  It's a film that doesn't make TCM's rotation very often, despite being from Warner Brothers.  After watching it, I recalled a program one of the radio stations I worked at used to play.  It was called '10-Minute Classics', as read by the fast-talking John Moschitta (of the old Federal Express commercials).  I found this on YouTube, and was embroiled with laughter.  I had to listen to the other 9 classics too...brought back some great memories!

 

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I've seen THE V.I.P.'s and I've seen WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? and while I reckon "Virginia Woolf" is a better movie it's also *exhausting* so I don't turn it on every time it airs on TCM.  But I do like THE V.I.P.'s enough to flick it on whenever it should air.   My 2¢ worth. 

Speaking of movies where some of the stars didn't have happy endings I think Rebel Without a Cause is the granddaddy of all flicks where various stars and co-stars didn't meet 'natural endings' at a ripe old age.  

Then there's Hangover Square (1945) starring Laird Cregar (already deceased by the end of '44), Linda Darnell and George Sanders.  (Good movie, I thought). 

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On 8/15/2021 at 1:03 PM, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Sterile Cuckoo (1969) DVD 8/10

A kooky girl (Liza Minnelli) falls for a shy straight arrow student (Wendell Burton) while at college for the first time.

There is a lot to enjoy in this one. Minnelli gives her best performance by far in this one, she is funny, quirky and very touching. She was nominated for her first Oscar, if Maggie Smith had not been around that year, Liza should have won it. This is very effective look at young love in all it's awkwardness and heartbreak. It was beautifully filmed on location in Clinton, NY with many great Autumn scenes. I also love the wistful song "Come Saturday Morning" sung by The Sandpipers.

Liza Minnelli also recorded a version of the song "Come Saturday Morning."  It was the title track of her second studio album for A&M.

Liza's recording includes some of her dialogue from The Sterile Cuckoo.

 

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THE DAY MARS INVADED EARTH (1963) last night on TBS I think starting at 3am it ran until 4:15am but I conked out at about 3:45... I've seen it before, it's dreadfully dull... yet, I have become interested in the "estate" it was filmed at (fascinating... with a BRICK pool...?)  but most of all I hadn't realized I had been looking at MARIE WINDSOR the first time or two I'd seen this fascinating BORE. 

DayMarsInvadedEarth.jpg

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@AllHallowsDay:  May I recommend the 1972 movie DEATH BED:  The Bed That Eats.  It wasn't fully completed for decades after it was made . . . but it was filmed at an estate in Michigan, I believe.  

DEATH BED:  The Bed That Eats!  Mmm . . . good human cracker!  An' crunchy, too! 

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Showdown (1973) A buddy-buddy Western, each with graying sideburns. Rock Hudson and Dean Martin grew up together but now are at opposite sides of the tracks. They are great together. Their banter sustains a gently comic tone, like a Bret Maverick talking to himself (though not one says, "As my pappy used to say ...") As might be expected, it comes down to Friendship versus Duty. Winsome Susan Clark is married to one of them. The three of them are great in an interior scene sitting at a table colluding, my favorite scene in the film. Not a great film nor was meant to be. But entertaining.

///

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On 8/16/2021 at 11:22 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

I think Margaret Rutherford's best performance is in Blithe Spirit as the psychic/medium.

Didn't realize the film was based on Vivian Leigh trying to leave Olivier for Peter Finch?

 

? ?  I thought the film was based on a play by Noel Coward.  I have heard that all three of them  (Noel Coward,  Vivien Leigh,  and Lawrence Olivier ) were friends,  but I did not know Blithe Spirit was written with Leigh and Olivier in mind.  Actually,  since Leigh did not meet Peter Finch until 1948, and the play was written in 1941,  I do wonder if there is a connection between the play  - even the filmed version of the play -- and the incident you allude to.  I sort of doubt it, but what do I know?

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*Monte Hellman (unintentional) Double Feature* 
The Shooting and Ride in the Whirlwind (both 1966) 

I had a yen for some short Westerns last night after work, and I stumbled on these two on the Criterion Channel. Both featured a 28/29 year old Jack Nicholson. He was alright in these, nothing to write home about. I think these were both fairly obscure releases at the time, but overall I had a pretty decent time watching them. The plots of both were incredibly simple and straight-forward (which is sometimes a blessing in disguise), and the acting was decent. Diary of Anne Frank (1959) star Millie Perkins also made appearances in both pictures, as did Cameron Mitchell (I only know him from How to Marry a Millionaire) in the latter. 

Existential Westerns: Criterion Editions of "The Shooting," "Ride in the  Whirlwind" | TV/Streaming | Roger Ebert

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Gambit (1966)

 

A man has a foolproof criminal plan. Then Shirley MacLaine happens.

This has long been one of my favorite movies of all time. It is wonderfully understated humor and an interesting little caper. It has Michael Caine as a bit of a rogue and shows how beautiful Shirley MacLaine truly is. I consider it one of Ronald Neame's best.

I hesitate to speak of the best parts because it would be spoilers and I would hate very much to taint any person's first viewing.

All I can say is that it is glorious and that all should watch it.

8.6/10

I am sorry to say that I can find it on streaming services only by rental or purchase. I purchased it on: Amazon Prime Video because we had promotional credits which were soon to expire and I could think of no higher purpose for them.

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On 8/15/2021 at 5:46 PM, Katie_G said:

I'm not a fan of the cookie-cutter Elvis movies with ludicrous plots and forgettable music, but Loving You, 1957,  is an early exception to that formula.  Elvis is very young (21) and basically plays himself and how he got started.   His name here is "Deke Rivers",  a local delivery truck driver who sings and plays a little guitar on the side.  One of my favorite noir dames, Lizabeth Scott, is the manager for Wendell Corey's country band.  Whenever "Deke" sits in, the girls go nuts for his singing, dance moves, and animal magnetism, which she's quick to exploit, booking them into smaller venues all over and building a fan base.   When town councils try to ban Deke as obscene, Liz fights for rock 'n roll as a 1st amendment issue.

Songs include Loving You, Teddy Bear, Hot Dog, Mean Woman Blues, etc.

elvis2.jpg.4cfbc90e242394e890c4dd6ef73e910d.jpg

Elvis1.jpg.6c860db932ce48e211d5bc9c6bd8cc99.jpg

Elvis1bb.jpg.4cdbdea3dfc2c1825f542813aa54f378.jpg

elvis2b.jpg.71d91d3c6624a8d634b0c889eb31ca02.jpg

Sadly Liz lost her lawsuit against Confidential magazine for outing her as gay and turned her back on Hollywood after this film.

Dolores Hart would quit Hollywood as well by joining a convent.

Wendell Corey became a raging alcoholic and died of a pickled liver at 54.

Gladys Presley (an extra) would be dead in couple of years.

Elvis would be dead on his bathroom floor at 42.

 

I guess celebrity isn't always what it's cracked up to be.

 

Loving You ws the first Elvis film I watched (when I was 12) and it is still my favorite.  It's the film of his that Elvis could never watch again after his mother passed due to her role as an extra.

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Movies from the last 10 days or so:

The Reader (2008) Didn't really care for it.  Feels like Oscar-bait, which i guess it was successful at, but i was expecting better.

Crossfire (1947) Good.  Watched it while working at home- wish i'd watched it with more attention.

Andy Hardy Meets Debutant (1940)

Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938)  Enjoyed both.  Slowly working through the Hardy series (seen 11 of them now).  Might have to buy the collection to see the early ones I haven't seen on TCM yet.

Let's Make Love (1960) Was hoping for more.

The World of Apu (1959) Finally finished the Apu trilogy.  This was my least favorite one.  I said after watching the first two that it was starting to feel unbelievable how everyone close to Apu ends up dying (sorry- spoilers), and this film continues that trend.

Buck Privates (1941) Starting to dive into the A&C films and watched this as I heard it was one of the best.  Thought i was decent.  Might watch some of the Monster A&C films next.

Return of the Living Dead (1985) Watched this back when I was 14.  Thought it was okay.  I'll skip the sequels.

The Life and Death of Col. Blimp (1943) A few questions, who is Col. Blimp and where was the death?  From wikipedia i read this was based on a famous comic strip but i don't know how closely related the film is to that character.  Was a bit disappointed that film that covers The Boer War, WW1 and WW2 didn't 'really' have much of them included in the film.  I think there was one shot of the ditches from WW1.  Disappointed in the end although the story around the duel was good.

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9 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Movies from the last 10 days or so:

The Reader (2008) Didn't really care for it.  Feels like Oscar-bait, which i guess it was successful at, but i was expecting better.

Crossfire (1947) Good.  Watched it while working at home- wish i'd watched it with more attention.

Andy Hardy Meets Debutant (1940)

Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938)  Enjoyed both.  Slowly working through the Hardy series (seen 11 of them now).  Might have to buy the collection to see the early ones I haven't seen on TCM yet.

Let's Make Love (1960) Was hoping for more.

 

Kate Winslet did win Best Actress for THE READER. I personally liked it, thought she was great and it was really something to see Ralph Fiennes play a sympathetic character in sharp contrast to trigger-happy Nazi Amon Goeth in SCHINDLER'S LIST.

CROSSFIRE is a great one without a doubt, with excellent performances from all three Roberts, Ryan, Mitchum and Young.

I skip the Andy Hardy movies. Never liked any of the Andy Hardy series, mainly because I'm not crazy about Mickey Rooney anyway.

LET'S MAKE LOVE wasn't bad but not one of Marilyn's best I admit.

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12 hours ago, SansFin said:

Gambit (1966)

TCM premiered this awhile back. I was thrilled since I own the full sheet poster but never saw the film! It was great but so full of tricks you cannot describe it, must be seen.

9 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

The Life and Death of Col. Blimp (1943)

I didn't get that movie at all. It's one of those movies I'll give a second chance to when in the right mood.

17 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

? ?  I thought the film was based on a play by Noel Coward. 

This is the kind of misunderstanding that happens when posts are unclear from those writing stream-of-consciously. I believe the poster was saying BLITHE SPIRIT was the better Rutherford role and the plot line of THE V.I.P.'s is based upon Olivier/Leigh/Finch personal relationship. But what do I know?🤡

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