Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I Just Watched...


speedracer5
 Share

Recommended Posts

Woke up at some ungodly hour yesterday with the t.v. on and appearing before me was a film I had never seen nor heard of before -- THE PRIVATE FILES OF J. EDGAR HOOVER.   I had fallen asleep in my faux chaise lounge when what sounded like the familiar strains of a Miklos Rozsa score wafted through my ears.   When the old Boomer eyes finally adjusted to the screen, they were greeted -- if that is the right word -- with Broderick Crawford, apparently essaying the title role.   Then in what seemed  like some '70's made-for-tv movie, up popped hearty Jose Ferrer, not-long-for-the-nursing home Lloyd Nolan, a dessicated Dan Dailey, two actors desperately trying to sound like JFK and Bobby Kennedy, June Havoc as Hoover's domineering mama, Jack Cassidy (portraying Damon Runyan) doing his John Barrymore-on-the-decline schtick, Lyndon Johnson by way of Andrew Duggan, Celeste Holm (garbed in some Ginger Rogers getting ready to dance with Fred Astaire flouncy outfit) as a Washingtonian society hostess, and in the most deliciously awful miscasting -- get ready -- Howard Da Silva as President Franklin Roosevelt!   

We see John Edgar as a controlling, eccentric ****-retentive, sexually repressed, mean-spirited piece of work who, when hearing a fly buzzing about, shouts to his secretary "SOMEONE GET A FLYSWATTER, QUICK!"    The offending insect lands on Hoover's shoulder, whereupon a terrified staff member quickly dispatches it with one good whack.

Unfortunately I conked out before this masterful biography came screeching to its inevitable conclusion.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Re: Gambit (1966):

TCM premiered this awhile back. I was thrilled since I own the full sheet poster but never saw the film! It was great but so full of tricks you cannot describe it, must be seen.

 

I wonder at all times how many people are terribly unimpressed during the first one-fourth of the movie and stop watching because it is so very prosaic.

I do not wish to give a spoiler but I am forever torn in my guess as to whether Harry knew of the twist of the last scene or if that was a secret which Emile kept from him. Whether or not Harry knew It changes substantially the magnitude of his final action. I would like to think that he did not know of it but he was sufficiently a rogue that I would not put it past him to have worked it into his calculations.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

By the way, Vivian Leigh made a couple of movies of Rex Harrison - they had good chemistry.

There is great value in proofreading/editing if you prefer being understood. 

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/17/2021 at 12:02 AM, Mr. Gorman said:

@AllHallowsDay:  May I recommend the 1972 movie DEATH BED:  The Bed That Eats.  It wasn't fully completed for decades after it was made . . . but it was filmed at an estate in Michigan, I believe.  

DEATH BED:  The Bed That Eats!  Mmm . . . good human cracker!  An' crunchy, too! 

I haven't seen it that I recall, but being a BAD movie fan, I am well aware of it.  Can't claim to be much interested, but if'n I ever do get the chance, I'll remember it's filmed at an "estate"...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:
15 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

The Life and Death of Col. Blimp (1943)

I didn't get that movie at all. It's one of those movies I'll give a second chance to when in the right mood.

That's the film that made me love ROGER LIVESEY.  I was already a fan of MICHAEL POWELL's films.   Definitely give it another chance.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sappy Alert

I am the more Romantic temperament these gray days of my life. I like it when old blues eye pops one of the most quixotic of all marriage proposals to an utterly flabbergasted Shirley. She can't believe it and neither can we.  [I couldn't find it on youtube]

"Well, what did you like about the book," says Frank, meaning the book he wrote and she allegedly read. "All of it."  "Like what?" "The characters." "What characters did you like best?"  "All of them." I think it was about this time those blue eyes grew dark. "You don't anything about the book!"  She then shows what might happen when one is truly honest. "I don't know why I like it. I just like it. I'm not smart like you. I like it because you wrote it and I love you."

Shirley MacLaine really happened.

[approximate quotes above]

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Woke up at some ungodly hour yesterday with the t.v. on and appearing before me was a film I had never seen nor heard of before -- THE PRIVATE FILES OF J. EDGAR HOOVER.   I had fallen asleep in my faux chaise lounge when what sounded like the familiar strains of a Miklos Rozsa score wafted through my ears.   When the old Boomer eyes finally adjusted to the screen, they were greeted -- if that is the right word -- with Broderick Crawford, apparently essaying the title role.   Then in what seemed  like some '70's made-for-tv movie, up popped hearty Jose Ferrer, not-long-for-the-nursing home Lloyd Nolan, a dessicated Dan Dailey, two actors desperately trying to sound like JFK and Bobby Kennedy, June Havoc as Hoover's domineering mama, Jack Cassidy (portraying Damon Runyan) doing his John Barrymore-on-the-decline schtick, Lyndon Johnson by way of Andrew Duggan, Celeste Holm (garbed in some Ginger Rogers getting ready to dance with Fred Astaire flouncy outfit) as a Washingtonian society hostess, and in the most deliciously awful miscasting -- get ready -- Howard Da Silva as President Franklin Roosevelt!   

We see John Edgar as a controlling, eccentric ****-retentive, sexually repressed, mean-spirited piece of work who, when hearing a fly buzzing about, shouts to his secretary "SOMEONE GET A FLYSWATTER, QUICK!"    The offending insect lands on Hoover's shoulder, whereupon a terrified staff member quickly dispatches it with one good whack.

Unfortunately I conked out before this masterful biography came screeching to its inevitable conclusion.

You didn't miss much! LOL. I saw it once, maybe last year.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Martha Hyer pales in comparison.

But then, she always does.

Right. That was part of the decision to fly to the unlikely one.  As well perhaps of the Rat Race in general.

"Why are going to marry her," says Dean. "She's a pig!"

"Oh, I don't know. She loves me, I've never had anybody love me before. And besides, maybe I can help her."

Oh, man, Frankie, don't let the rest of the Rat Pack hearing you talk like that. They'll throw you out of the pool room.

:lol:

[approximate quotes above]

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Martha Hyer pales in comparison.

But then, she always does.

She plays a bad girl in The Big Fisherman and is actually pretty good! Maybe they were just casting her wrong. It's like Hart Bochner, who seemed like the most wooden actor on TV until he played a killer on a mini-series called And the Sea Will Tell.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, laffite said:

Right. That was part of the decision to fly to the unlikely one.  As well perhaps of the Rat Race in general.

"Why are going to marry her," says Dean. "She's a pig!"

"Oh, I don't know. She loves me, I've never had anybody love me before. And besides, maybe I can help her."

Oh, man, Frankie, don't let the rest of the Rat Pack hearing you talk like that. They'll throw you out of the pool room.

:lol:

[approximate quotes above]

I'm confused as to what you really think about the decision of the Dave Hirsh to agree to marry Ginny Moorehead.    

Such a one-sided marriage would have never worked and Dave would have been stepping out on Ginny after a few months.

PS:  Gwen French is clearly the women with more issues so ending that relationship was wise,  but that doesn't mean one takes up with someone they don't love just because they are the lesser-evil.      Marrying anyone would have put Dave more squarely into the Rat Race. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

'm confused as to what you really think about the decision of the Dave Hirsh to agree to marry Ginny Moorehead.   

I think we see it the same. I was hamming it up.

My comments are more about Shirley than Frank.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Woke up at some ungodly hour yesterday with the t.v. on and appearing before me was a film I had never seen nor heard of before -- THE PRIVATE FILES OF J. EDGAR HOOVER.

Darn!  I'd just been searching for that one, out of Larry Cohen completism! 😡  Finally had to go scrounging on YouTube, with success.

(You generally know you're going to be thrown a few clever curveballs with Cohen on the script or direction...Can't get enough of his stuff.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bet you all didn't know that Meester Hoover was into the hobby of building fireplaces?  In fact, Larry Cohen made a movie about it . . . but it went sadly *unreleased*. 

THE PRIVATE FLUES OF J. EDGAR HOOVER (!)

(I'm sorry.  I just couldn't help myself). 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

That's the film that made me love ROGER LIVESEY.  I was already a fan of MICHAEL POWELL's films.   Definitely give it another chance.

Have you seen Roger Livesey in one of his final wonderful roles, as the Duke of St. Bungay in 18 episodes of the miniseries The Pallisers? If not, you may enjoy this brief scene.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...