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I saw most of Saratoga Trunk today and found it even more delightful than I remembered. Ingrid Bergman and Gary Cooper have great chemistry, and this is much more fun than For Whom the Bell Tolls. Florence Bates has a great role as the grande dame of the grandest Saratoga hotel. No one today would cast the role of Bergman's maid, Angelique (yes, Dark Shadows fans, Angelique) with a British actress in blackface, but Flora Robson's performance is fine, and within the parameters of the role, respectful. John Warburton is the rich man Bergman targets for matrimony, and I wish Ethel Griffies had another scene or two as the domineering mother who's on to the phony countess.

Ah, Ingrid Bergman in dark hair. Ingrid Bergman getting tipsy on peaches in champagne. Bergman scheming and flirting. Do you prefer:

1) Ingrid Bergman looking sexy in Saratoga Trunk;

2) Ingrid Bergman looking constipated in Viaggio in Italia.

For all the acclaim heaped on Viaggio in Italia, it's basically a domestic melodrama (a.k.a. a woman's picture) for the arty set. If I'm going to be bored in an unhappy marriage, then let me have enough money like Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders to rent that delightful villa and travel through the scenic beauties of Italy. Unfortunately, Rossellini never makes me care a hoot about the quarreling couple, and as for the ending of that film: is it more dishonest to suggest that 1) a saucy minx could end up with Gary Cooper or that 2) what an unhappily married couple needs is a baby? Which belief is more dangerous in real life?

By the way, Sam Wood isn't given much love as a director, but Saratoga Trunk, like his earlier picture Kings Row, is well-directed. The camera is usually in the right place in the interior scenes without any flashy camera moves, and that's what this film needs.

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8 hours ago, King Rat said:

I saw most of Saratoga Trunk today and found it even more delightful than I remembered. Ingrid Bergman and Gary Cooper have great chemistry, and this is much more fun than For Whom the Bell Tolls. Florence Bates has a great role as the grande dame of the grandest Saratoga hotel. No one today would cast the role of Bergman's maid, Angelique (yes, Dark Shadows fans, Angelique) with a British actress in blackface, but Flora Robson's performance is fine, and within the parameters of the role, respectful. John Warburton is the rich man Bergman targets for matrimony, and I wish Ethel Griffies had another scene or two as the domineering mother who's on to the phony countess.

Ah, Ingrid Bergman in dark hair. Ingrid Bergman getting tipsy on peaches in champagne. Bergman scheming and flirting. Do you prefer:

1) Ingrid Bergman looking sexy in Saratoga Trunk;

2) Ingrid Bergman looking constipated in Viaggio in Italia.

For all the acclaim heaped on Viaggio in Italia, it's basically a domestic melodrama (a.k.a. a woman's picture) for the arty set. If I'm going to be bored in an unhappy marriage, then let me have enough money like Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders to rent that delightful villa and travel through the scenic beauties of Italy. Unfortunately, Rossellini never makes me care a hoot about the quarreling couple, and as for the ending of that film: is it more dishonest to suggest that 1) a saucy minx could end up with Gary Cooper or that 2) what an unhappily married couple needs is a baby? Which belief is more dangerous in real life?

By the way, Sam Wood isn't given much love as a director, but Saratoga Trunk, like his earlier picture Kings Row, is well-directed. The camera is usually in the right place in the interior scenes without any flashy camera moves, and that's what this film needs.

I really like FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS, but SARATOGA TRUNK is another great pairing between them. Yes, you would have to adjust to seeing Flora Robson in blackface, but as you said, there was nothing really offensive about it. She's not mocking the race of the character at all (though I do wonder why they couldn't or wouldn't find a black actress to play the role).

VIAGGIO IN ITALIA is certainly watchable, if only for the scenery and the performances of Ingrid and George Sanders. I would love to travel through Italy myself (along with Switzerland).

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One reason Saratoga Trunk, is so good is that it was written by Edna Ferber.  I was on a Ferber  kick long ago and read about a dozen of her novels through the library.  I checked recently and they now have zero. Just from the ones adapted for movies we had, Giant, So Big, Cimarron, Showboat and a few more.  They're all a little bit soapy but in such a good way!

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Thunder in the East (1952)

An Alan Ladd vehicle from Paramount which continued a studio tradition by casting him as an adventurer or opportunist in exotic Far East settings. Previous film titles of this nature were China, Calcutta and Saigon. This one is set in Ghandahar, a small province in independent India in 1947, as native tribesmen in the hills lead by an ambitious warlord are staking it out for attack. Of course those natives are indigenous to the land, as opposed to the Europeans, primarily British, that seem to largely occupy the province in this film. But I guess we're not supposed to think about that.

Ladd plays a gun runner who lands a plane full of weapons in the province so the local Maharaja can purchase them for defence. His fast buck plans backfire, though, as the Maharaja's Prime Minister right hand, who really runs the province, is an avowed Gandhi-like pacifist who refuses to purchase the weapons but confiscates them so Ladd can't sell them to the tribesmen instead (which he would do).

Distinguishing this film as a cut above other Ladd features are two co-starring performances.  Charles Boyer, serene and dignified in brown face, as the pacifist Indian with a suspiciously French sounding accent, and Deborah Kerr, as a blind English woman with a positive attitude whose upbeat spirit breaks through Ladd's glib, hard shell kindling in him a feeling of concern for her. Kerr is quite affecting in her role, vulnerable, yet never seeming a plucky noble spirit despite her physical affliction stereotype. Ladd's gradual (if predictable) conversion from fast buck opportunist to someone starting to identify with people with finer aspirations is convincingly portrayed by the actor in a role that fits him like a glove. Corrine Calvet, on the other hand, is largely wasted in a fourth billed role as a woman eager to escape from the province before the native attack begins.

The film reaches a peak in interest at its fairly rousing finale which, while perhaps a bit rushed, is still affecting. The final minutes of this production are memorable even if the overall film itself may not be. A better than decent exotic melodrama, it may be short on action, but its three stars and the overall professionalism of the presentation, including Charles Vidor's direction, still manages to maintain the interest.

Thunder in the East, not one of Ladd's better remembered films, was recently released on DVD by Via Vision as part of The Alan Ladd Collection, Volume One. Other titles in the five disc collection are Two Years Before the Mast (1946), Calcutta (1947), Red Mountain (1951) and 13 West Street (1962). By the way this was the second film in Boyer's career with the same title. He had made a British film called The Battle in 1934, renamed Thunder in the East when released in the United States.

Thunder in the East (1952) - IMDb

2.5 out of 4

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There appear to be some Saratoga Trunk fans here.

I have always found this film a slow moving disappointment, with Ingrid Bergman's character increasingly getting on my nerves. And the film seems to go on forever.

On the positive side, though, the film has exceedingly handsome production values (that opening New Orleans street set is an eye popping atmospheric wonder), Bergman and Gary Cooper have genuine chemistry (it's fun watching Coop as Col. Clint Maroon, the closest he ever came to playing a Rhett Butler type) and a lush, romantic musical score by Max Steiner (one of his best).

But the screenplay just drags this film down for me. In the final analysis, I just don't care about Cleo Dulaine and all her duplicitous ploys, and I wish that Col. Clint had found the time to push a cake or pie in her smiling, pretty face. The film sure was big box office, though, when it was released in late 1945 at a time when neither Bergman nor Cooper could do anything wrong as far as the movie going public was concerned. The two stars, by the way, began an affair while making For Whom the Bell Tolls which they continued through this production, as well. I guess that has something to do with all that chemistry between them popping off the screen.

Saratoga Trunk 1945 -Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman, Flora Robson смотреть  онлайн

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whew, had to come up for air from the DARK SHADOWS binge-a-thon I've been on for a while.

All nine seasons of PERRY MASON are on imdb tv, with waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay fewer commercials than there are on PLUTO (which also shows PERRY MASON re-runs, only you can't choose which ones.)

man, TV Producers and writers in the 50s/60s really thought a hell of a lot more of the intelligence of the average viewer than now, these are some LABYRINTHINE, INTRICATE stories that would have, on occasion, I imagine even RAYMOND CHANDLER scratching his head.

For "straight" episodes- I recommend THE CASE OF THE NEBULOUS NEPHEW, which has a great twist at the end not related to the ID of the murderer, and THE CASE OF THE DEADLY VERDICT, which guest stars a surprisingly haggard JULIE ADAMS as a woman whose case Perry loses and who goes on death row.

but the one I think I enjoyed the most was THE CASE OF CONSTANT DOYLE, which was one of FOUR GUEST STAR EPISODES in SEASON SIX (1963) done for the series when RAYMOND BURR was in the hospital for a month.

MISS BETTE DAVIS steps in wearing a mink and a hard-front wig and proceeds to TEAR IT UP as a widowed lady lawyer named CONSTANT DOYLE who is working on a murder case wherein it seems her late husband was involved in a swindle.

in all honesty, this episode could have been expanded into a feature film, and it has some wonderful things to say about being a WOMAN LAWYER.

Sadly, it did not end up turning into a series of its own, although I would wager there was talk of it at the time.

Channing Thomson on Twitter: "In 1963, Raymond Burr, for health reasons,  couldn't work as #PerryMason on a handful of episodes & several guest stars  filled in. For one episode, Bette Davis took

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Last night, I watched (or re-watched) Dirty Rotten Scoundrels with Steve Martin, Michael Caine and Glenne Headly (sp?) (a remake of Bedtime Story with David Niven, Marlon Brando and Shirley Jones).  The basic plot is Martin and Caine are con artists out to one up one another.  Glenne becomes the object of their last bet.  Don't want to spoil the ending.  Excuse typos.

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King of Thieves (2018)

 

An aging crook comes out of retirement for one last big job.

This movie broke new ground for me! I had never before had even a hint of a whisper of a suggestion that a Michael Caine caper movie might be insipid, boring and a complete waste of time. I would likely have laughed at the idea. But here it is.

This movie takes the true story of men with one foot in the grave who stage the most monumental burglary in London history and turns it into an episode of: The Bickersons. The "Afterschool Movie" production values did not help. The editor and director needed a deft hand to present one of the most daring thefts of all time as a plodding exercise with all the tension and thrill of watching the gurgling of a clogged drain.

Michael Caine is a particular favorite of mine but he is here with poor makeup acting as if his underwear is heavily starched and he is in his tenth consecutive day of constipation. The same might be said of his emotional range as it is obvious he can not give a 

The rest of the cast have stellar reputations also but one would never guess it from these performances.

1.6/23
 

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

There appear to be some Saratoga Trunk fans here.

I have always found this film a slow moving disappointment, with Ingrid Bergman's character increasingly getting on my nerves. And the film seems to go on forever.

On the positive side, though, the film has exceedingly handsome production values (that opening New Orleans street set is an eye popping atmospheric wonder), Bergman and Gary Cooper have genuine chemistry (it's fun watching Coop as Col. Clint Maroon, the closest he ever came to playing a Rhett Butler type) and a lush, romantic musical score by Max Steiner (one of his best).

But the screenplay just drags this film down for me. In the final analysis, I just don't care about Cleo Dulaine and all her duplicitous ploys, and I wish that Col. Clint had found the time to push a cake or pie in her smiling, pretty face. The film sure was big box office, though, when it was released in late 1945 at time when neither Bergman nor Cooper could do anything wrong as far as the movie going public was concerned. The two stars, by the way, began an affair while making For Whom the Bell Tolls which they continued through this production, as well. I guess that has something to do with all that chemistry between them popping off the screen.

Saratoga Trunk 1945 -Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman, Flora Robson смотреть  онлайн

Tom, thanks for posting this great still, which captures the characters and their emotions so well.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

whew, had to come up for air from the DARK SHADOWS binge-a-thon I've been on for a while.

All nine seasons of PERRY MASON are on imdb tv, with waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay fewer commercials than there are on PLUTO (which also shows PERRY MASON re-runs, only you can't choose which ones.)

man, TV Producers and writers in the 50s/60s really thought a hell of a lot more of the intelligence of the average viewer than now, these are some LABYRINTHINE, INTRICATE stories that would have, on occasion, I imagine even RAYMOND CHANDLER scratching his head.

For "straight" episodes- I recommend THE CASE OF THE NEBULOUS NEPHEW, which has a great twist at the end not related to the ID of the murderer, and THE CASE OF THE DEADLY VERDICT, which guest stars a surprisingly haggard JULIE ADAMS as a woman whose case Perry loses and who goes on death row.

but the one I think I enjoyed the most was THE CASE OF CONSTANT DOYLE, which was one of FOUR GUEST STAR EPISODES in SEASON SIX (1963) done for the series when RAYMOND BURR was in the hospital for a month.

MISS BETTE DAVIS steps in wearing a mink and a hard-front wig and proceeds to TEAR IT UP as a widowed lady lawyer named CONSTANT DOYLE who is working on a murder case wherein it seems her late husband was involved in a swindle.

in all honesty, this episode could have been expanded into a feature film, and it has some wonderful things to say about being a WOMAN LAWYER.

Sadly, it did not end up turning into a series of its own, although I would wager there was talk of it at the time.

Channing Thomson on Twitter: "In 1963, Raymond Burr, for health reasons,  couldn't work as #PerryMason on a handful of episodes & several guest stars  filled in. For one episode, Bette Davis took

Yes, Bette as a lawyer in a weekly series! I'd tune in to watch that. Too bad nothing came of it. Wasn't Michael Parks her client?

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30 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yes, Bette as a lawyer in a weekly series! I'd tune in to watch that. Too bad nothing came of it. Wasn't Michael Parks her client?

YES HE WAS (oops, caps lack) and FRANCES REID of DAYS OF OUR LIVES fame was also in it, A LOT of FAMILIAR FACES have popped up in the dozen or so episodes I've watched- ROBERT REDFORD, BEULAH BONDI, ADAM WEST, JASON EVERS (of THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE)- and that's just who I can recall offhand.

for those with digital TVs, IMDB TV is pretty cool, everything is FREE, it doesn't have excessive commercials and there are  A LOT of CLASSIC TV SHOWS.

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14 hours ago, King Rat said:

I saw most of Saratoga Trunk today and found it even more delightful than I remembered. Ingrid Bergman and Gary Cooper have great chemistry, and this is much more fun than For Whom the Bell Tolls. Florence Bates has a great role as the grande dame of the grandest Saratoga hotel. No one today would cast the role of Bergman's maid, Angelique (yes, Dark Shadows fans, Angelique) with a British actress in blackface, but Flora Robson's performance is fine, and within the parameters of the role, respectful. John Warburton is the rich man Bergman targets for matrimony, and I wish Ethel Griffies had another scene or two as the domineering mother who's on to the phony countess.

Ah, Ingrid Bergman in dark hair. Ingrid Bergman getting tipsy on peaches in champagne. Bergman scheming and flirting. Do you prefer:

1) Ingrid Bergman looking sexy in Saratoga Trunk;

2) Ingrid Bergman looking constipated in Viaggio in Italia.

For all the acclaim heaped on Viaggio in Italia, it's basically a domestic melodrama (a.k.a. a woman's picture) for the arty set. If I'm going to be bored in an unhappy marriage, then let me have enough money like Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders to rent that delightful villa and travel through the scenic beauties of Italy. Unfortunately, Rossellini never makes me care a hoot about the quarreling couple, and as for the ending of that film: is it more dishonest to suggest that 1) a saucy minx could end up with Gary Cooper or that 2) what an unhappily married couple needs is a baby? Which belief is more dangerous in real life?

By the way, Sam Wood isn't given much love as a director, but Saratoga Trunk, like his earlier picture Kings Row, is well-directed. The camera is usually in the right place in the interior scenes without any flashy camera moves, and that's what this film needs.

I enjoyed Saratoga Trunk more than I expected to.  I loved Bergman in a bit of a bad girl role, an her chemistry with Coop was great.  Flora Robson as the maid was tough to get used to, and apparently, the part was offered to black actresses, Lena Horne and Ethel Waters, who perhaps may have not wanted to play a maid.  My husband had an interesting insight about the role.  Angelique has a line, early on,  when Cooper's character calls her "Mammy," and she says, "Don't ever call me that."  He said that in 1940s Hollywood, perhaps it would be more acceptable for a white actress playing a mulatto maid to say that than for a black actress, that  a black actress saying that line would have been too controversial.

 

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Last night I watched the 1941 version of DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE starring Spencer Tracy, Lana Turner and Ingrid Bergman.

All I can say is I could not take my eyes of Lana Turner. She was 19-21 years old. Wow...simply wow. 

The movie was....well...it was Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The story is the story. But Lana Turner was a real movie star. All of them were, but she just owned the camera....the screen. 

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The Frogmen (1951) - FXM On Demand

w/ Richard Widmark, Dana Andrews, Gary Merrill, Jeffrey Hunter, Warren Stevens, Robert Wagner (but I must have blinked during his screen appearance), Harvey Lembeck and Robert Rockwell. Plus, down in uncredited land, Parley Baer, James Gregory, Robert Patten and Jack Warden. And directed by Lloyd Bacon.

You've seen this movie before even if you haven't seen this particular movie before. An experienced military unit gets a new commanding officer after the death of their former leader. And, of course, he is nothing like his much-loved predecessor. And, of course, the team resents him for that. Until, of course, circumstances eventually demonstrate that he is worthy to be one of them.

Obviously originality wasn't a prerequisite for a movie to receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Story back in 1951.

However, having this unit be one of the U.S. Navy's Underwater Demolitions Team in action during World War 2 with that action presented in a semidocumentary style does boost this one up a couple of pegs. And, besides, one rarely goes wrong with Richard Widmark.

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5 minutes ago, LiamCasey said:

The Frogmen (1951) - FXM On Demand

w/ Richard Widmark, Dana Andrews, Gary Merrill, Jeffrey Hunter, Warren Stevens, Robert Wagner (but I must have blinked during his screen appearance), Harvey Lembeck and Robert Rockwell. Plus, down in uncredited land, Parley Baer, James Gregory, Robert Patten and Jack Warden. And directed by Lloyd Bacon.

You've seen this movie before even if you haven't seen this particular movie before. An experienced military unit gets a new commanding officer after the death of their former leader. And, of course, he is nothing like his much-loved predecessor. And, of course, the team resents him for that. Until, of course, circumstances eventually demonstrate that he is worthy to be one of them.

Obviously originality wasn't a prerequisite for a movie to receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Story back in 1951.

However, having this unit be one of the U.S. Navy's Underwater Demolitions Team in action during World War 2 with that action presented in a semidocumentary style does boost this one up a couple of pegs. And, besides, one rarely goes wrong with Richard Widmark.

How did they not cast this guy in The Frogmen?

Classic Film and TV Café: Seven Things to Know About Lloyd Bridges

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

How did they not cast this guy in The Frogmen?

Classic Film and TV Café: Seven Things to Know About Lloyd Bridges

Obviously whomever was in charge of the precognition department at 20th Century Fox at that time did a lousy job!

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2 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

Last night I watched the 1941 version of DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE starring Spencer Tracy, Lana Turner and Ingrid Bergman.

All I can say is I could not take my eyes of Lana Turner. She was 19-21 years old. Wow...simply wow. 

The movie was....well...it was Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The story is the story. But Lana Turner was a real movie star. All of them were, but she just owned the camera....the screen. 

Lana certainly had IT.   Check her out -- reteamed with Tracy -- in CASS TIMBERLANE.  Turner is feisty but sweet as a small-town girl.  She and Spencer definitely have chemistry together.  The title character is a judge.  Watch Lana's bedroom eyes seduce him in court.  No man could resist, lol.

They're showing the '32 J&H with Fredric March tomorrow I believe.  Everyone has their favorite version.

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Ingrid Bergman looks incredibly chic from head to toe in GOODBYE AGAIN.  She owns a beautiful Parisian wardrobe (and apartment).  Almost on a fashion par with Vivian Leigh in THE ROMAN SPRING OF MRS. STONE.  Her character -- a middle-aged interior decorator named Paula --  chooses to endure a five-year relationship with sleepy-eyed, emotionally hollow, faithless Yves Montand.  Then there are the stalker-ish attentions of gangly, PSYCHO-grinning rich boy Anthony Perkins, who professes his undying love.

What's a girl to do? 

This is a rather sophisticated story with a very leisurely, "European" feel.   

I enjoyed it.

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4 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Ingrid Bergman looks incredibly chic from head to toe in GOODBYE AGAIN.  She owns a beautiful Parisian wardrobe (and apartment).  Almost on a fashion par with Vivian Leigh in THE ROMAN SPRING OF MRS. STONE.  Her character -- a middle-aged interior decorator named Paula --  chooses to endure a five-year relationship with sleepy-eyed, emotionally hollow, faithless Yves Montand.  Then there are the stalker-ish attentions of gangly, PSYCHO-grinning rich boy Anthony Perkins, who professes his undying love.

What's a girl to do? 

This is a rather sophisticated story with a very leisurely, "European" feel.   

I enjoyed it.

Goodbye Again is based on a novel by Francoise Sagan--the French title is Aimez-vous Brahms?, which explains the use of Brahms as theme music for the movie. Ideally, a woman would like something better than either Montand or Perkins. Sagan also wrote the novels Bonjour Tristesse and A Certain Smile.

Rossellini seemed to cast Bergman as unhappy wives. Although Bergman left Hollywood for what she thought would be better roles with Rossellini, to my mind he never gave her a role as good as the ones she had in Casablanca, Gaslight, Notorious, and Saratoga Trunk. The wife in Stromboli has reason to be unhappy, and this is my favorite of the four Bergman/Rossellini collaborations. I believe we are supposed to find her characters in Viaggio in Italia and Europa '51 sympathetic, but I do not. Fear is a European film noir, basically the same kind of film Joan Crawford was playing in America.

 

 

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I always thought Ingrid thrived and gave her best performances under the structured Hollywood studio system.   In my opinion those Italian neo-realistic films were just not Bergman's forte. 

    

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Those guest star episodes of Perry Mason never did much for me. I suppose Bette Davis' was the

best, but the one with Hugh O'Brian as a double aught spy was pretty dull. Tonight The Case of

the Singing Skirt was on. A nasty type planted a gun and some marijuana ciggies in Perry's client's

apartment. Perry sent Paul to check it out and sure enough, there were half a dozen joints in a

drawer. Paul took one out and took a sniff and then........put the weed back in the drawer. He didn't

even light one up and take a few tokes. Oh Pauly, you're a cool hep cat swinger, man. Nobody's going

to talk. 

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Bette was a big fan of Perry Mason and watched it religiously every week -- which is why she so enthusiastically offered to fill in for Raymond Burr.

I can see Bette sitting in her living room, a cig in one hand, glass of an adult beverage in the other, those large Bette Davis eyes glued to the television, alternately cheering and yelling at the screen during certain crucial plot points in the mystery...

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17 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Bette was a big fan of Perry Mason and watched it religiously every week -- which is why she so enthusiastically offered to fill in for Raymond Burr.

I can see Bette sitting in her living room, a cig in one hand, glass of an adult beverage in the other, those large Bette Davis eyes glued to the television, alternately cheering and yelling at the screen during certain crucial plot points in the mystery...

Didn't know that. Of course it was a popular program back in the day. Yeah, I'm sure she took it to heart and

was an enthusiastic viewer, maybe letting a few cuss words fly now and then. I'm just imagining Bette going on the

program and getting a promise that Joan Crawford would never be on it in lieu of her salary.  Not that Mother

Goddam would ever do such a thing.

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