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On 8/30/2021 at 11:32 AM, SansFin said:

King of Thieves (2018)

 

An aging crook comes out of retirement for one last big job.

This movie broke new ground for me! I had never before had even a hint of a whisper of a suggestion that a Michael Caine caper movie might be insipid, boring and a complete waste of time. I would likely have laughed at the idea. But here it is.

This movie takes the true story of men with one foot in the grave who stage the most monumental burglary in London history and turns it into an episode of: The Bickersons. The "Afterschool Movie" production values did not help. The editor and director needed a deft hand to present one of the most daring thefts of all time as a plodding exercise with all the tension and thrill of watching the gurgling of a clogged drain.

Michael Caine is a particular favorite of mine but he is here with poor makeup acting as if his underwear is heavily starched and he is in his tenth consecutive day of constipation. The same might be said of his emotional range as it is obvious he can not give a 

The rest of the cast have stellar reputations also but one would never guess it from these performances.

1.6/23
 

SansFin, based on your (fantastically written) review, I've definitely got to see this, lol.

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2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

SansFin, based on your (fantastically written) review, I've definitely got to see this, lol.

I warned you of: Fluffy (1965). You then watched it.

I warned you of: King of Thieves (2018). You now say that you wish to watch it.

It appears obvious that you do not wish my help or advice. Go ahead and watch: Mutant Vampire Zombies from the 'Hood! (2008), Curse of the Pink Panties (2007)  or Blubberella (2011) for all I care! 😉

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I once watched Masked Avenger Versus Ultra-Villain in the Lair of the Naked Bikini (2000).

This is a shot-on-videotape movie that I got hold of -- and traded off gladly!  It's no worse than scads of other SOV movies that have been pumped out direct to video since the mid-1980s, but it's bonkers.  🤪   

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15 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Those guest star episodes of Perry Mason never did much for me. I suppose Bette Davis' was the

best, but the one with Hugh O'Brian as a double aught spy was pretty dull. Tonight The Case of

the Singing Skirt was on. A nasty type planted a gun and some marijuana ciggies in Perry's client's

apartment. Perry sent Paul to check it out and sure enough, there were half a dozen joints in a

drawer. Paul took one out and took a sniff and then........put the weed back in the drawer. He didn't

even light one up and take a few tokes. Oh Pauly, you're a cool hep cat swinger, man. Nobody's going

to talk. 

William Talman, who played the DA on the show, was actually removed from the cast and credits for a short time.   In 1960, he was at a party that the police raided, suspecting marijuana use.  When the police conducted the raid, they found Talman and seven others nude or partially nude.  They were arrested for marijuana possession and lewd vagrancy.  The drug charges were dropped and the lewd conduct charge was dismissed in court.  He was fired from the show, but later reinstated.

He was in his early 40s when the show started and turned 50 the last year of the show.  He looked  older than that.  He died at 53 from lung cancer.  He was the first celebrity to do an anti-smoking PSA for the American Cancer Society.

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2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

William Talman, who played the DA on the show, was actually removed from the cast and credits for a short time.   In 1960, he was at a party that the police raided, suspecting marijuana use.  When the police conducted the raid, they found Talman and seven others nude or partially nude.  They were arrested for marijuana possession and lewd vagrancy.  The drug charges were dropped and the lewd conduct charge was dismissed in court.  He was fired from the show, but later reinstated.

He was in his early 40s when the show started and turned 50 the last year of the show.  He looked  older than that.  He died at 53 from lung cancer.  He was the first celebrity to do an anti-smoking PSA for the American Cancer Society.

Yes, I recall reading about Talman's adult party. In retrospect it sounds more comical than anything else,

though at the time it was a pretty big deal, understandably. It certainly would have given a spark to the

profile of Ham Burger, who was presented as a pretty dull guy. Talman shows up in a few post-Perry Mason

TV shows, mostly westerns as I recall. He certainly looked older than his age and I imagine his smoking contributed

something to that. After Ray Collins left the show they still kept his name in the credits as they knew he watched

the show every week. Nice gesture. 

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3 hours ago, SansFin said:

I warned you of: Fluffy (1965). You then watched it.

I warned you of: King of Thieves (2018). You now say that you wish to watch it.

It appears obvious that you do not wish my help or advice. Go ahead and watch: Mutant Vampire Zombies from the 'Hood! (2008), Curse of the Pink Panties (2007)  or Blubberella (2011) for all I care! 😉

LOL   Thanks!  Looking forward!

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I just watched the Criterion DVD of Robert Altman's 3 WOMEN '77 spurred on by a post in this thread. It stars Shelly Duvall and Sissy Spacek, two actresses I can't get enough of and in that aspect, loved this movie.

Lots of weird emotions played by both actresses fill a rather thin story: Spacek is a new hire at an elderly PT health spa in the California desert. Duvall is her "trainer". There is quite a few scenes showing the employees (all young women) caring gently for their patrons. The lighting of these scenes create a somber mood with the theme of water & twins most prominent. 

Maybe I'm old, but both actresses looked absolutely gorgeous. AND they both were powerhouse actresses here. I still cannot believe Duvall started acting on a chance meeting, she's mesmerizing in her performance. Both were. The third woman is played by Janice Rule, who is quiet & somber. I kind of gathered these were 3 aspects of one character which kind of sews ups at the end of the movie.

Like other Altman films, this one left me somewhat confused and dissatisfied. But the imagery & emotional performances definitely stick with you after viewing. Worth one watch for the acting & production...two watches if you want to understand the story better.

Great car in the back ground and Shelly ROCKS her Gunne Sax original dress...

3-women-1977-sc01-max.jpg

...and she drives a mustard color Pinto!

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17 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

William Talman, who played the DA on the show, was actually removed from the cast and credits for a short time.   In 1960, he was at a party that the police raided, suspecting marijuana use.  When the police conducted the raid, they found Talman and seven others nude or partially nude.  They were arrested for marijuana possession and lewd vagrancy.  The drug charges were dropped and the lewd conduct charge was dismissed in court.  He was fired from the show, but later reinstated.

He was in his early 40s when the show started and turned 50 the last year of the show.  He looked  older than that.  He died at 53 from lung cancer.  He was the first celebrity to do an anti-smoking PSA for the American Cancer Society.

I was just coming here to talk about this!!!

Apparently, there was such an aggressive letter-writing campaign from the viewers asking for WILLIAM TALMAN to be re-instated that the producer GAIL PATRICK JACKSON (yes, the former GAIL PATRICK of STAGE DOOR) was able to convince the network to rehire him...apparently she was a very nurturing Producer and believed in protecting the talent on the show...

it maybe also helped that COSTAR WILLIAM HOPPER (aka PAUL DRAKE) was the son of HEDDA HOPPER, and methinks p'raps Mama looked out for her boy when it came to his show getting Good Press.

for the record, I kindasorta think TALMAN is maybe the BEST THING about the show- he takes the character of a d1ckhole prosecutor with a track record on par with the Seattle Mariners and really has a ball with it. there was one episode the other day where the lady who went on to play CANDY THE STEWARDESS on THE GOLDEN GIRLS played an addlepated witness on the stand confessing to a murder she did not commit and his FACIAL REACTIONS WERE PRICELESS. 

TALMAN could have made a smashing comedic actor.

See the source image

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ALSO ALSO ALSO ALSO (last one, I swear)

RAYMOND BURR is an odd case. He was apparently a big humanitarian and environmentalist, but at the same time it appears that he lied about being widowed, having a child who died and serving in action in WWII.

Again, methinks p'raps hiring HEDDA HOPPER'S SON and providing him with a working gig helped saved RAY'S bacon.

Nowadays, this behaviour would get one cancelled, as the kids say, but fast.

COPIED AND PASTED VFROM WIKIPEDIA:

Biographical contradictions

At various times in his career, Burr and his managers and publicists offered spurious or unverifiable biographical details to the press and public. Burr's obituary in The New York Times states that he entered the US Navy in 1944, after The Duke in Darkness, and left in 1946, weighing almost 350 pounds (160 kg).[4] Although Burr may have served in the Coast Guard, reports of his service in the US Navy are false, as apparently are his statements[75] that he sustained battle injuries at Okinawa.[6]:57–58[76][a]

Other false biographical details include years of college education at a variety of institutions, being widowed twice, a son who died young, world travel and success in high school athletics.[6]:17, 20, 23–24, 40–41 Most of these claims were apparently accepted as fact by the press during Burr's lifetime, up until his death[4][12] and by his first biographer, Ona Hill.[3]:27[b]

Burr reportedly got married at the beginning of World War II to an actress named Annette Sutherland[77]—killed, Burr said, in the same 1943 plane crash that claimed the life of actor Leslie Howard. However, multiple sources have reported that no one by that name appears on any of the published passenger manifests from the flight.[3]:19–20 A son supposedly born during this marriage, Michael Evan, was said to have died of leukemia in 1953 at the age of ten.[3][4][12] Another marriage purportedly took place in the early 1950s to a Laura Andrina Morgan—who died of cancer, Burr said, in 1955.[76] Yet no evidence exists of either marriage, nor of a son's birth, other than Burr's own claims.[6]:44–45 As late as 1991, Burr stood by the account of this son's life and death. He told Parade that when he realized Michael was dying, he took him on a one-year tour of the United States. "Before my boy left, before his time was gone", he said, "I wanted him to see the beauty of his country and its people."[12] After Burr's death, his publicist confirmed that Burr worked steadily in Hollywood throughout 1952, the year that he was supposedly touring the country with his son.[6]:216

In the late 1950s, Burr was rumored to be romantically involved with Natalie Wood.[1] Wood's agent sent her on public dates so she could be noticed by directors and producers, and so the men she dated could present themselves in public as heterosexuals. The dates helped to disguise Wood's relationship with Robert Wagner, whom she later married.[6]:64–70[78]:205–06 Burr reportedly resented Warner Bros.' decision to promote her attachment to another gay actor, Tab Hunter, rather than him. Robert Benevides later said, "He was a little bitter about it. He was really in love with her, I guess."[79]:214[c]

Later accounts of Burr's life say that he hid his homosexuality to protect his career.[70] "That was a time in Hollywood history when homosexuality was not countenanced", Associated Press reporter Bob Thomas recalled in a 2000 episode of Biography. "Ray was not a romantic star by any means, but he was a very popular figure ... If it was revealed at that time in Hollywood history it would have been very difficult for him to continue."[6]:119[d]

Arthur Marks, a producer of Perry Mason, recalled Burr's talk of wives and children: "I know he was just putting on a show. ... That was my gut feeling. I think the wives and the loving women, the Natalie Wood thing, were a bit of a cover."[6]:100Dean Hargrove, executive producer of the Perry Mason TV films, said in 2006, "I had always assumed that Raymond was gay, because he had a relationship with Robert Benevides for a very long time. Whether or not he had relationships with women, I had no idea. I did know that I had trouble keeping track of whether he was married or not in these stories. Raymond had the ability to mythologize himself, to some extent, and some of his stories about his past ... tended to grow as time went by."[6]:214

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ALSO ALSO ALSO ALSO (last one, I swear)

RAYMOND BURR is an odd case. He was apparently a big humanitarian and environmentalist, but at the same time it appears that he lied about being widowed, having a child who died and serving in action in WWII.

Again, methinks p'raps hiring HEDDA HOPPER'S SON and providing him with a working gig helped saved RAY'S bacon.

Nowadays, this behaviour would get one cancelled, as the kids say, but fast.

COPIED AND PASTED VFROM WIKIPEDIA:

Biographical contradictions

At various times in his career, Burr and his managers and publicists offered spurious or unverifiable biographical details to the press and public. Burr's obituary in The New York Times states that he entered the US Navy in 1944, after The Duke in Darkness, and left in 1946, weighing almost 350 pounds (160 kg).[4] Although Burr may have served in the Coast Guard, reports of his service in the US Navy are false, as apparently are his statements[75] that he sustained battle injuries at Okinawa.[6]:57–58[76][a]

Other false biographical details include years of college education at a variety of institutions, being widowed twice, a son who died young, world travel and success in high school athletics.[6]:17, 20, 23–24, 40–41 Most of these claims were apparently accepted as fact by the press during Burr's lifetime, up until his death[4][12] and by his first biographer, Ona Hill.[3]:27[b]

Burr reportedly got married at the beginning of World War II to an actress named Annette Sutherland[77]—killed, Burr said, in the same 1943 plane crash that claimed the life of actor Leslie Howard. However, multiple sources have reported that no one by that name appears on any of the published passenger manifests from the flight.[3]:19–20 A son supposedly born during this marriage, Michael Evan, was said to have died of leukemia in 1953 at the age of ten.[3][4][12] Another marriage purportedly took place in the early 1950s to a Laura Andrina Morgan—who died of cancer, Burr said, in 1955.[76] Yet no evidence exists of either marriage, nor of a son's birth, other than Burr's own claims.[6]:44–45 As late as 1991, Burr stood by the account of this son's life and death. He told Parade that when he realized Michael was dying, he took him on a one-year tour of the United States. "Before my boy left, before his time was gone", he said, "I wanted him to see the beauty of his country and its people."[12] After Burr's death, his publicist confirmed that Burr worked steadily in Hollywood throughout 1952, the year that he was supposedly touring the country with his son.[6]:216

In the late 1950s, Burr was rumored to be romantically involved with Natalie Wood.[1] Wood's agent sent her on public dates so she could be noticed by directors and producers, and so the men she dated could present themselves in public as heterosexuals. The dates helped to disguise Wood's relationship with Robert Wagner, whom she later married.[6]:64–70[78]:205–06 Burr reportedly resented Warner Bros.' decision to promote her attachment to another gay actor, Tab Hunter, rather than him. Robert Benevides later said, "He was a little bitter about it. He was really in love with her, I guess."[79]:214[c]

Later accounts of Burr's life say that he hid his homosexuality to protect his career.[70] "That was a time in Hollywood history when homosexuality was not countenanced", Associated Press reporter Bob Thomas recalled in a 2000 episode of Biography. "Ray was not a romantic star by any means, but he was a very popular figure ... If it was revealed at that time in Hollywood history it would have been very difficult for him to continue."[6]:119[d]

Arthur Marks, a producer of Perry Mason, recalled Burr's talk of wives and children: "I know he was just putting on a show. ... That was my gut feeling. I think the wives and the loving women, the Natalie Wood thing, were a bit of a cover."[6]:100Dean Hargrove, executive producer of the Perry Mason TV films, said in 2006, "I had always assumed that Raymond was gay, because he had a relationship with Robert Benevides for a very long time. Whether or not he had relationships with women, I had no idea. I did know that I had trouble keeping track of whether he was married or not in these stories. Raymond had the ability to mythologize himself, to some extent, and some of his stories about his past ... tended to grow as time went by."[6]:214

Pretty common back in the day for either actors or their agents to stretch the truth about their backgrounds, but these are beyond the pale.

Collins became ill late in the series run, but he was still credited on screen until he passed away at age 75 in July 1965.  He missed episodes broadcast from January 1964 to May 1965.  Supposedly Gail Patrick Jackson knew he watched every week and wanted to keep his spirits up.   Long associated with Orson Welles, he doesn't look much different in his Citizen Kane days than he does on Mason.

One thing I noticed about Raymond Burr's appearance in watching  reruns - in many episodes he had really dark circles around his eyes.  It's more noticeable in some episodes than others.  That's the thing with the HD-remastered prints of old filmed TV shows nowadays - we can see things that wouldn't be noticed on an old 19 inch B&W set.

 

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6 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

one thing I noticed about Raymond Burr's appearance in watching  reruns - in many episodes he had really dark circles around his eyes.  It's more noticeable in some episodes than others.  That's the thing with the HD-remastered prints of old filmed TV shows nowadays - we can see things that wouldn't be noticed on an old 19 inch B&W set.

 

I personally am rather curious as just what exactly he was in the hospital for during that four episode stretch in SEASON SIX. Their official story was "dental surgery," but I dunno...

(although, to be fair, they did something like 30 EPISODES OF PERRY MASON A SEASON, and BURR is in at least 70% of those episodes, all of them an hour long. so maybe it was legit exhaustion.)

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23 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I personally am rather curious as just what exactly he was in the hospital for during that four episode stretch in SEASON SIX. Their official story was "dental surgery," but I dunno...

(although, to be fair, they did something like 30 EPISODES OF PERRY MASON A SEASON, and BURR is in at least 70% of those episodes, all of them an hour long. so maybe it was legit exhaustion.)

Thirty episodes a season was the norm for most series by the time PM ended.   Half hour shows typically had a few more per season. In 1964-65, the first season of Bewitched had 36 episodes.  

In the 1950s, the typical season was 39 episodes.  Viewers could expect 9 months of episodes without repeats, and new episodes running until the end of June.   TV inherited this schedule from radio, generally.  Over the years, the number of episodes per season gradually declined. Twenty to 22 is typical now, for network series.  Cable and streaming series are usually closer to the British model, with considerably fewer episodes.

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50 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Thirty episodes a season was the norm for most series by the time PM ended.   Half hour shows typically had a few more per season. In 1964-65, the first season of Bewitched had 36 episodes.  

In the 1950s, the typical season was 39 episodes.  Viewers could expect 9 months of episodes without repeats, and new episodes running until the end of June.   TV inherited this schedule from radio, generally.  Over the years, the number of episodes per season gradually declined. Twenty to 22 is typical now, for network series.  Cable and streaming series are usually closer to the British model, with considerably fewer episodes.

!

thats an insane workload.

i recall one time somebody referred to a British sitcom as “long running” because it had maybe 14 episodes.

meanwhile GREYS ANATOMY chugs on....

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

!

thats an insane workload.

i recall one time somebody referred to a British sitcom as “long running” because it had maybe 14 episodes.

meanwhile GREYS ANATOMY chugs on....

Most Britcoms have 5 or 6 episodes a series (we call it a season), and occasionally up to 10, and if they have a run of more than 2 or 3 series (and not necessarily consecutive years), then it's a success.  Fawlty Towers had 2 series, and the second one was 4 years after the first, for a total of 12 episodes.

There was one Britcom in the mid-80s/90s that's an exception.  'Allo 'Allo! had one series with 26 episodes, and episode running times of 25 minutes (instead of the typical 30 minute time on BBC).  The reason is that the producers were trying to sell it to the US syndication market, and they needed more episodes to fill a typical season, and they had to reduce the running time to allow for commercials.  It ended up not selling in the US.

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TALKING ABOUT A DIFFERENT TIME THOUGH,

The real story of RAYMOND BURR'S military service and WAR INJURIES(!!??) alone could have been unearthed in a hot second by any reporter anywhere at any time and shut the entire series down fast, to say nothing of his homosexuality.

I feel like there's some sort of delicious ELLROYIAN 50'S SHOWBIZ TABLOIDY-TYPE TALE that could be created about this scenario.

Was TALMAN a sacrificial lamb tossed to the tabloids to divert attention?

And what of HEDDA HOPPER? Did she bury more than a few torrid scoops in order to guarantee a paycheck for HER BABY BOY? [Who hated her GUTS, but then again, WHO DIDN'T?)

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Feeling myself drowned in a sea of television miniseries of late, the proliferation of which as we all know is dizzying, I found it necessary to seek respite and latched on to a couch potato lifesaver ring in the form of the Criterion Channel. I have a monthly subscription but rarely use it and feel damn guilty bout sometimes, I mean $10.99 a month should not just be thrown away. After having tried and failed to get into MANIFEST on Netlix (or is Amazon Prime. HBOMax? Whatever.), I, as I say, looked towards CC for sanity and frantically and hastily ran down the list of films and chose a move to watch, almost without seeing what it was. 

It turned out to be Les Dames du Bois de Boulange (1945), a film by Robert Bresson. I never heard of this one.

Hélène and Jean have pledged their love to each other, but are not engaged to marry. Their love affair allows dalliances with others, but they have promised to put each other first above all others. Hélène has been warned by a friend that Jean's love for her has cooled and fears this is correct, Wikepedia.

This is the launching point and contains no spoilers. It is a satisfying little drama. There are implausibilities that would probably make it all but impossible to remake in the modern vein, but Bresson keeps the story sufficiently claustrophobic and the characters sufficiently myopic and it makes a fine go. The story sticks to who the characters are and what they do with only a cursory sense of the outer world.

Okay, I've had my little break from the incessant vulgarity of modern television. Now back to GOLIATH.

//

 

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25 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

TALKING ABOUT A DIFFERENT TIME THOUGH,

The real story of RAYMOND BURR'S military service and WAR INJURIES(!!??) alone could have been unearthed in a hot second by any reporter anywhere at any time and shut the entire series down fast, to say nothing of his homosexuality.

I feel like there's some sort of delicious ELLROYIAN 50'S SHOWBIZ TABLOIDY-TYPE TALE that could be created about this scenario.

Was TALMAN a sacrificial lamb tossed to the tabloids to divert attention?

And what of HEDDA HOPPER? Did she bury more than a few torrid scoops in order to guarantee a paycheck for HER BABY BOY? [Who hated her GUTS, but then again, WHO DIDN'T?)

To gain any real traction, the story would have had to have been run by Hedda Hopper, Walter Winchell, Dorothy Kilgallen, Louella Parsons, or some other national gossip ****.  They each had their own targets to take down, so either it wasn't enough of a story for them, or there was some sort of quid pro quo, or he was well-liked and they looked the other way.

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4 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

To gain any real traction, the story would have had to have been run by Hedda Hopper, Walter Winchell, Dorothy Kilgallen, Louella Parsons, or some other national gossip ****.  They each had their own targets to take down, so either it wasn't enough of a story for them, or there was some sort of quid pro quo, or he was well-liked and they looked the other way.

ah, DOROTHY KILGALLEN, now there is a marvelous film noir.

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when I was five or six, I would watch PERRY MASON reruns in the early 1980s on TBS, and I was within that delightful valley of childhood wherein  one is  smart enough to follow, but dumb enough to believe- and I LEGIT THOUGHT that that was what my father, an attorney, who was also tall and dark, did every single day in court**.

**yes, i mean got someone off for FIRST DEGREE MURDER because someone in the gallery lept up and CONFESSED!

I also ADORED BARBARA HALE because she reminded me of any number of ladies of that age, smokers, coffee drinkers, Contract Bridge players, who were always husky-voiced and highly competent.

a bygone type, really- but still around in 1983 (or so.)

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I've noticed in later seasons that RAY COLLINS, who plays the inexplicably octagenarian POLICE LIEUTENANT has started to scale back his appearances.

And they replaced him with that ugly Wesley Lau. who Mason annoyingly called Det. Andy. His last name was Anderson! And those ugly hats he wore. Total UGH.

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