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Indiscreet (1958)

 

A truly sophisticated, wonderfully talented, and very successful woman falls in love with the ultimate forbidden fruit - a married man who can not get a divorce.

This movie is the most soul-warming and heart-comforting movie ever made. It shows true romance in gentle touches, soft smiles and the joy of just being together. The lingering shots of doors closing discreetly are utterly sensual.  

I am sorry to say that it might be a spoiler but the deepest and most meaningful scene in any movie is when she is in her bathrobe with her face covered with cold cream and is acting totally silly and turns to see the most handsome and desirable man who ever existed is standing in the archway watching her. We instantly feel her mortification and desire to become two inches tall and sneak away unseen.

This is the ultimate love story within the mystical and mythic world of those who are aristocratic by right of talent. It is the good humor and gentle wit of those who know their lives are blessed. (Anna: "I wish you didn't have any money. [Pause] I wonder if I would have said that if you had not just bought a yacht.") 

I love Ingrid Bergman in all things but she is here beyond perfection especially after the 1:04:40 mark when there crops up the tiniest little fly in the ointment. 

This is a romance but it is not a women-only movie! It is one of my little fuzzy's favorites of all time. I believe that this may in part be because all men wish to be Cary Grant and this is at his most suave and smooth. I believe he identifies deeply also with Cary Grant's little subterfuge. The beauty and charm of Ingrid Bergman is not lost on him. 

10/10

This is now available for viewing for free with commercials on: PlutoTV and free to subscribers to: Amazon Prime Video.

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13 hours ago, SansFin said:

Indiscreet (1958

10/10

This is now available for viewing for free with commercials on: PlutoTV and free to subscribers to: Amazon Prime Video.

I think maybe INDISCREET is in the Public domain, because there are several full length versions on YouTube.

I would recommend to anyone looking to watch anything to NEVER watch it on Pluto TV, even if that is the only source.

Pluto follows AMC’s business model of first and foremost being a broadcaster of commercials. if bits and pieces of movies and TV shows sort of *Happen* to occur (as if by accident) in between the UNENDING BARAGE OF ADS, then so be it- But that’s not really why they’re in the game.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I would recommend to anyone looking to watch anything to NEVER watch it on Pluto TV, even if that is the only source.

Pluto follows AMC’s business model of first and foremost being a broadcaster of commercials. if bits and pieces of movies and TV shows sort of *Happen* to occur (as if by accident) in between the UNENDING BARAGE OF ADS, then so be it- But that’s not really why they’re in the game.

Commercials on: PlutoTV "live" channels are approx. ten minutes within each hour.

Commercials on: PlutoTV "on-demand" offerings vary by platform, user and location. Roku, AppleTV and iOS users in rural settings see the least commercials. PlutoTV uses 'organic' advertising to target users. A few unfortunate people may see more commercials than normal because they straddle several demographics and use the mobile app.

I am sorry to say that the major fault which we find with: PlutoTV is the glitch which causes a television program or movie to lock into repeating from ten seconds to three minutes continuously. This happens solely when watching "on-demand" offerings. It is best at times to check the limited schedule to see if what you desire to watch is appearing soon on a "live" channel and watch it then rather than risking using the "on-demand" feature.

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21 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

TALKING ABOUT A DIFFERENT TIME THOUGH,

The real story of RAYMOND BURR'S military service and WAR INJURIES(!!??) alone could have been unearthed in a hot second by any reporter anywhere at any time and shut the entire series down fast, to say nothing of his homosexuality.

I feel like there's some sort of delicious ELLROYIAN 50'S SHOWBIZ TABLOIDY-TYPE TALE that could be created about this scenario.

Was TALMAN a sacrificial lamb tossed to the tabloids to divert attention?

And what of HEDDA HOPPER? Did she bury more than a few torrid scoops in order to guarantee a paycheck for HER BABY BOY? [Who hated her GUTS, but then again, WHO DIDN'T?)

Yes, I'd believe that.

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17 hours ago, SansFin said:

Indiscreet (1958)

 

A truly sophisticated, wonderfully talented, and very successful woman falls in love with the ultimate forbidden fruit - a married man who can not get a divorce.

This movie is the most soul-warming and heart-comforting movie ever made. It shows true romance in gentle touches, soft smiles and the joy of just being together. The lingering shots of doors closing discreetly are utterly sensual.  

I am sorry to say that it might be a spoiler but the deepest and most meaningful scene in any movie is when she is in her bathrobe with her face covered with cold cream and is acting totally silly and turns to see the most handsome and desirable man who ever existed is standing in the archway watching her. We instantly feel her mortification and desire to become two inches tall and sneak away unseen.

This is the ultimate love story within the mystical and mythic world of those who are aristocratic by right of talent. It is the good humor and gentle wit of those who know their lives are blessed. (Anna: "I wish you didn't have any money. [Pause] I wonder if I would have said that if you had not just bought a yacht.") 

I love Ingrid Bergman in all things but she is here beyond perfection especially after the 1:04:40 mark when there crops up the tiniest little fly in the ointment. 

This is a romance but it is not a women-only movie! It is one of my little fuzzy's favorites of all time. I believe that this may in part be because all men wish to be Cary Grant and this is at his most suave and smooth. I believe he identifies deeply also with Cary Grant's little subterfuge. The beauty and charm of Ingrid Bergman is not lost on him. 

10/10

This is now available for viewing for free with commercials on: PlutoTV and free to subscribers to: Amazon Prime Video.

I can see that the film Indiscreet really moved you since this is one of the best write-up I have seen.   I.e. you're channeling the vibe of the film in style!

I really love the film.   The ending is  somewhat of a drag in that we know any "fuss" isn't really going anywhere.    We all know love will overcome all.

   (but the husband of Bergman's helper is very funny).

 

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6 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

   (but the husband of Bergman's helper is very funny).

 

Cecil Parker truly is a treasure! He was quite right that the drink he invented - Bourbon and Bisodol - did not catch on. 😀

I have been known to use in real life one of his lines: "I'm too old for this sort of evening. I always was." 

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15 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Cecil Parker truly is a treasure! He was quite right that the drink he invented - Bourbon and Bisodol - did not catch on. 😀

I have been known to use in real life one of his lines: "I'm too old for this sort of evening. I always was." 

Cecil Parker is a treasure but I was referring to the "caretakers" (that is what Wiki is calling them),  Carl and Doris Banks.     Carl being used as "David" to try to get Grant jealous was one of the funnies moments.    Carl was played by David Kossoff.      Funny but use of the term "helper" was my third attempt at trying to find the right term.     I first had husband of the maid,  but rejected that since Doris was more than just a maid.    So next I picked "servant",  but since I just re-watched Guess Who's Coming to Dinner I decide that wouldn't be the right term to use (silly me,  right!).

As for Parker;  He does get in some very good lines as a man stuck in the middle between Philip (Grant),   and his wife (also well play by Phyllis Calvert) and  their close friend Anna.

 

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Cecil Parker is a treasure but I was referring to the "caretakers" (that is what Wiki is calling them),  Carl and Doris Banks.     Carl being used as "David" to try to get Grant jealous was one of the funnies moments.    Carl was played by David Kossoff.      Funny but use of the term "helper" was my third attempt at trying to find the right term.     I first had husband of the maid,  but rejected that since Doris was more than just a maid.    So next I picked "servant",  but since I just re-watched Guess Who's Coming to Dinner I decide that wouldn't be the right term to use (silly me,  right!).

As for Parker;  He does get in some very good lines as a man stuck in the middle between Philip (Grant),   and his wife (also well play by Phyllis Calvert) and  their close friend Anna.

 

Ah yes! The wonderful David Kossoff! He is quite perfect.

I am sorry to say that the one off-note in the entire movie for me was the weak little attempt at humour when he dropped his glasses and did not realize that she had moved until he replaced them.

It is such a joy when he is dithering about how all the stepping in and stepping back had to be right. 

 

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On 5/22/2015 at 1:10 AM, speedracer5 said:

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town.  I recorded this film for Jean Arthur.  I'll have to admit right here that I've seen three Capra films: It Happened One Night, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Arsenic and Old Lace.  My opinion of star Gary Cooper unfortunately is not that high.  He was awful in Love in the Afternoon.  I found him very dull and in Love in the Afternoon, director Billy Wilder would have been better off hiring a mannequin for Cooper's part.  In Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Cooper wasn't that bad, but I can't figure out WHY he was such a big star.  Maybe he was better in silent films.  Cooper just seems to have no pizzazz.  Perhaps if they had cast James Stewart or maybe even Cary Grant, it might have been more interesting.  I wanted to say Errol Flynn, but he might have had too much flair for the part of Longfellow Deeds.  I hate to say it, but I liked Adam Sandler and Winona Ryder's remake better! But I did love Jean Arthur in this film.  She never gives a bad performance in my opinion.

I have to agree. Some actors are so lauded by critics and fans, and, for the life of me, I just don't get it. Gary Cooper is one of those for me also. I also agree about Jean Arthur. It hard not to have a crush on her - cute, pretty, and w/ acting chops.

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4 minutes ago, SansFin said:

It is such a joy when he is dithering about how all the stepping in and stepping back had to be right. 

Yea,  that is the main scene I was referring too.    I believe such a film needs this type of silly,  slightly out-of-place (based on what has occurred so far),  type scene,  especially when the final outcome is known by all.      How to end these type of romantic films is one of the biggest challenges  for screenwriter and directors.    In the 30s,  the director would just of had David show up at Anna's,  they would look into each others eyes and then THE END would show up and the film would be around 75 minutes.   But for these 50s "A" productions they needed to go at least over 85 minutes (or so),  and Indiscreet clocks in at 100 minutes.    So without these silly scenes I might have lost interest with the last quarter of the film.     

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ALICE DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE 3.5/5 

I thought this a fairly decent film from Scorsese; this is one of his few films that seems to focus on a character of the more feminine persuasion. I enjoyed this, although I wanted to give it a higher rating than I did but it just didn't quite reach that point for me. I will say that I thought Ellen Burstyn's performance was quite solid, as were those of Kris Kristofferson and Diane Ladd (fun fact, a 7 or 8 year old Laura Dern can be seen sitting at the diner counter in one of the scenes towards the end of the film). 

 

PLANET OF THE APES (1968) 3.5/5

I had been putting this film off for months, possibly even years, but I finally broke down and decided to watch it. I'm glad I did, because it was a solid entry in the sci-fi repertoire; I don't much care for Charlton Heston in looks or in acting choices (the exception being DeMille's "Ten Commandments"), but I didn't mind him in this role at all. I do think there were some scenes that I could have ultimately done without, but overall, I think it was a quite engaging piece. I would recommend it to anyone who is wanting to view older sci-fi films. 

 

UNFORGIVEN (1992) 3.5/5

In my opinion, this was entirely too long of a film given the subject matter... I felt like there were a few unnecessary scenes, as well as a few that were somewhat of a chore to sit through... maybe that's just me, though. I really do enjoy westerns, but I think this one felt inconsistent to me at times; there were several scenes that I felt were quite engaging, and a few that seemed rather tedious. 
 

THE TIME MACHINE (1960) 3.5/5 

Let me first preface this by stating that no one truly knows for certain what the future will hold. That being said, I don't think the futuristic society depicted here is an accurate reflection of what life will be like by then. I really enjoy time travel as a major premise for films, and this was executed pretty well. There was a scene where Rod Taylor demonstrated how the machine operated, and the passage of time was observed by a mannequin in a store window, with her outfits being switched to fit the fashion of the times. I thought that was a clever method of showing the effects of time travel and the passage of time. The time-lapse photography was also a clever touch; no wonder this film won the Academy Award for special effects. 

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The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing

 

   Thisone Might Now Be my Second (or First) Favourite Burt Reynolds Film. (To Go Along With and Complement 100 Rifles.). (Deliverance, is now knocked down to third fiddle.).

    Apologies For the Expletive and it might get edited out (but im keeping it anyway); Theres A Damn Fine Triumvirate of Acting in this Flick Between Madam Sara(h) Miles, Burt Reynolds, and the Always Reliable Lee J. Cobb.  Incidentally, Also Possess (imo) One of the Prettiest Kisses In/On Film.

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British Intelligence (1940) - IMDb

British Intelligence (1940) CUNY TV channel 6/10

Set during WWI, there are some enemy agents in a British household.

Interesting film with many double and even triple twists. Boris Karloff is very good, he uses a French accent as a butler with a scarred face and a limp. Margaret Lindsay is also good, and she was a dark haired exotic beauty. Although set in WWI days, it has many parallels to the then current German attack on the British.

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

British Intelligence (1940) - IMDb

British Intelligence (1940) CUNY TV channel 6/10

Set during WWI, there are some enemy agents in a British household.

Interesting film with many double and even triple twists. Boris Karloff is very good, he uses a French accent as a butler with a scarred face and a limp. Margaret Lindsey is also good, and she was a dark haired exotic beauty. Although set in WWI days, it has many parallels to the then current German attack on the British.

I'm guessing Boris is a baddie in this one?

I suppose the filmmakers could have been drawing parallels to the current war going on at the time (we wouldn't get mixed into it until the attack on Pearl Harbor the following year) but just decided to have the story take place during last war 20 years earlier. Maybe setting it into the present time of 1940 would have hit too close to home for certain parties.

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27 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I'm guessing Boris is a baddie in this one?

I suppose the filmmakers could have been drawing parallels to the current war going on at the time (we wouldn't get mixed into it until the attack on Pearl Harbor the following year) but just decided to have the story take place during last war 20 years earlier. Maybe setting it into the present time of 1940 would have hit too close to home for certain parties.

Boris seems to be good at first, then bad, then maybe good again, so it's one of twisty moments in it. 

It definitely shows the Germans as evil and murderous. There is a veiled reference to Hitler with a line about "how many people must be killed when one man sets himself above the Almighty"

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Could barely get through THE BIGGEST BUNDLE OF THEM ALL.   One of those mid-to-late '60's international heist comedy-adventures that think they're so clever and hip.  Please pass this one up because you will be missing nothing.  The cast includes the terminally bland Robert Wagner whose inflection-less voice and wooden manner nevertheless served him best in A KISS BEFORE DYING; Raquel Welch, as always hopelessly out of her element; Vittorio de Sica (a little of Vittorio, as an actor, goes a very long way) and, rounding out this stultifying "romp" is the one and only Edward G. Robinson, cast apparently for old-school Hollywood gangster cred, although frankly I'm sure Akim Tamiroff would have worked just as well and probably for less.   

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18 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

THE TIME MACHINE (1960) 3.5/5 

Let me first preface this by stating that no one truly knows for certain what the future will hold. That being said, I don't think the futuristic society depicted here is an accurate reflection of what life will be like by then. 

The secret to understand HG Wells is that it's ALL allegory--There was a big craze for Socialism among the leftwing thinkers during the George & Edward years after Victoria's empire crumbled, and Wells' scifi  novels were on the corner distributing pamphlets about class division, British imperialism, and mankind's unfortunate tendency toward dictatorships if left to their own devices.  (People who claim Obama or Biden are "socialists" should not watch Wells' screenplay to Things to Come (1936), lest their heads explode.)  Even his non-scifi novels like "Kipps" were usually English class-dramas of the poor young proletariat struggling to survive among the corrupt, money-hungry elite.

In this case, it doesn't take a great leap to understand why junior high always made you read a book about underground machine workers turning into apes and cannibalizing on the weak, ineffectual above-ground utopia.

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On 9/2/2021 at 4:53 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

[ ... ]   Funny but use of the term "helper" was my third attempt at trying to find the right term.     I first had husband of the maid,  but rejected that since Doris was more than just a maid.    So next I picked "servant",  but since I just re-watched Guess Who's Coming to Dinner I decide that wouldn't be the right term to use (silly me,  right!).

[ ... ]

It frustrated me greatly that I knew the precisely correct term but I did not know its English equivalent! Translation programs would return only: 'worker' or: 'servant'.

 He and his wife were: factotums. They were employees of the hotel providing all and sundry services to the resident guest and calling in other employees to assist when necessary.

It was by this that Doris was maid and ladies maid and housekeeper and cook and seamstress and confidant and secretary and all of the other things which a lady needs doing but laundry, glass and mirror polishing, vacuuming, preparing fine dinners and other such heavy or specialized work was done by those staff who she detailed and supervised. 

I am sure that Carl had other duties in addition to being chauffer but I can not think now what use a man might be around the house. 

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44 minutes ago, SansFin said:

It frustrated me greatly that I knew the precisely correct term but I did not know its English equivalent! Translation programs would return only: 'worker' or: 'servant'.

 He and his wife were: factotums. They were employees of the hotel providing all and sundry services to the resident guest and calling in other employees to assist when necessary.

It was by this that Doris was maid and ladies maid and housekeeper and cook and seamstress and confidant and secretary and all of the other things which a lady needs doing but laundry, glass and mirror polishing, vacuuming, preparing fine dinners and other such heavy or specialized work was done by those staff who she detailed and supervised. 

I am sure that Carl had other duties in addition to being chauffer but I can not think now what use a man might be around the house. 

Thanks for that info.     Never heard of the term "factotums" so I looked it up and it is a great fit for what Doris was.     As for Carl;  well he comes off as rather meek,  so I assume Doris put him to work!  I.e. he didn't have a choice about what he would have to do when he wasn't driving Anna around.

 

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Thanks for that info.     Never heard of the term "factotums" so I looked it up and it is a great fit for what Doris was.     As for Carl;  well he comes off as rather meek,  so I assume Doris put him to work!  I.e. he didn't have a choice about what he would have to do when he wasn't driving Anna around.

 

Shirley you've heard of the aria "Largo al Factotum" from The Barber of Seville? OK, I'll post it in the the opera thread.

 

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Two's Company, a British sitcom that ran on London Weekend Television (franchise is now part of ITV) from 1975-9, and later broadcast nationwide.   Starring Elaine Stritch as an American ex-pat author living in Chelsea and Donald Sinden as her butler/factotum, the show derives its comedy from the culture clash of a brash American living in London going head-to-head with her stiff-upper-lip butler.    Stritch's character seems to have a love-hate relationship with London and the UK (and her butler).  She says she left the US to escape the rat race, yet complains about how slow, bureaucratic and stuffy the UK can be at times.

I haven't seen this since the 1970s when our local PBS member station ran it.   I enjoyed it then, but can appreciate it even more after living in London for a few years.

Available on IMDb for free (no registration required, either), it is interrupted by commercials.  Unfortunately, they don't place them at the original LWT commercial break (which is in the middle of the show).  So far, they have appeared in two blocks, each block being about 2 minutes long, but they pop up rather randomly, interrupting the flow of the show.  This is fairly common with the free streaming sites.

Recommend it if you're a fan of British sitcoms, interested in the US/UK culture clash (as it was in the late 70s), or a fan of Ms. Stritch.

 

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A Lady to Love (Sjöström, 1930). Edward G. Robinson couldn't do everything--his Italian-American schtick in this film wears very thin very quickly. If you've seen Tiger Shark (1932) or Manpower (1941), you've seen this film (a romantic triangle between EGR, the leading lady, and his kid brother, set in an Italian-American grape-growing community in the Napa Valley) in its essence already. I kept telling myself Sturgeon's Law applies to pre-Code films as much as it does to everything else.

Per Movie Collector OH's database, this aired several times in 1994, and has not been seen on TCM since. Rights issues (it is based on a play), or mercy towards EGR's legacy?

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15 hours ago, SansFin said:

I am sure that Carl had other duties in addition to being chauffer but I can not think now what use a man might be around the house. 

He's seen polishing silver and with an ash shovel. He's the unobtrusive chaperone for her first date. He's ready and willing when Doris thinks Bergman wants something heavy moved.

And then, of course, when Bergman's romantic troubles come to a head, and she needs a man, he's there for her.

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