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I'm watching the beautiful Eleanor Parker,  in films such as Scaramouche and  now The  Very Thought of You,  but according to my cable,   today TCM is showing Janet Leigh films:  E.g. Romance of Rosy Ridge.

Is this happening to others?

 

 

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12 minutes ago, 37kitties said:

I think you're very wrong about that. I worked with a man whose name was Dimson - but it had been anglicized from the original Dimopoulis - and he was almost the spitting image of Jason. A very distinguished-looking gentleman of Greek ancestry - and very handsome in the Robards way. Same size and build too.

Hope my previous post didn't come across in any inappropriate way.

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I'm watching the beautiful Eleanor Parker,  in films such as Scaramouche and  now The  Very Thought of You,  but according to my cable,   today TCM is showing Janet Leigh films:  E.g. Romance of Rosy Ridge.

Is this happening to others?

There's a thread about this - started by Sepiatone. It's titled "Whaaa-aa?"

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I'm watching the beautiful Eleanor Parker,  in films such as Scaramouche and  now The  Very Thought of You,  but according to my cable,   today TCM is showing Janet Leigh films:  E.g. Romance of Rosy Ridge.

Is this happening to others?

 

 

Yeah I'm currently watching The Very Thought of You too and was wondering this too. Romance of Rosy Ridge was on yesterday, schedule on website shows Chaplin's Modern Times is gonna be on later, but my guide doesn't show it at all and all the movies seem wrong.

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7 minutes ago, Hibi said:

It's SO long.........

Yes.

I do like the ending -- it's rather poignant -- "Come on you, hurry you, people are waiting, people are waiting...."  

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4 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Yes.

I do like the ending -- it's rather poignant -- "Come on you, hurry you, people are waiting, people are waiting...."  

The fact there are no familiar actors in it doesn't help either. One of these days I'll watch it all the way through.......

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The only familiar face to me in AMERICA, AMERICA  is Joanna Frank, unforgettable as Regina the Bee Girl in the classic 1960's sci-fi program The Outer Limits.  (that episode is entitled "ZZZZZZ")

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16 hours ago, SansFin said:

Bulldog Drummond Escapes (1937)

Bulldog Drummond at Bay (1937)

Bulldog Drummond's Peril (1938)

 

A World War One veteran seeks danger and excitement and beautiful women to lift him out of the boredom of being just another English gentleman of independent means.

I recently discovered that: TubiTV has these and several more Bulldog Drummond movies. 

It is interesting to see the differences which Ray Milland, John Lodge and John Howard bring to the role. R. Milland is the most polished but his humor seems a bit forced. I had the impression that J. Lodge did not find the role comfortable. That his movie was the worst-written did not help. I found J. Howard to be the most believable as a man who would go through life as an undemanding bum if he were not wealthy and this seems to me to fit the concept of the character.

6.4/10   5.2/10   6.1/10

I am sorry to say that there is one Bulldog Drummond movie which I have never watched.  13 Lead Soldiers (1948) starring Tom Conway does not seem to be available anywhere.

 

Never seen any of this series but have been curious about them.  So many films are in my queue but think i need to give these a shot sooner than later.

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I give Sandra props for covering I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry. Not as good as Hank, but not too

bad. I would have rather seen John Doe with X, but it was Sandra's movie. I'm pretty sure I went

to see The Arrangement when it came out. Not sure why. Maybe I was hit with a rock and hadn't

fully  recovered. I don't remember it much, just that it was rather dull and drawn out. Forgot

Kerr's nude scene, though it might have been one of those nude scenes where if you blink you

miss the naughty bits. 

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Kerr's tush scene is relatively tame in THE ARRANGEMENT, done as it is in a gauzy, "European" way, nothing to blush over except knowing that this is the distinguished Miss Deborah Kerr's behind and not, say, Jayne Mansfield's.

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Since Vincent Canby's worst films of 1969 got a  strong reaction yesterday, I am providing the only other worst list he was able to do: The Worst films of 1970, posted here :

Quote

‘‘ MYRA BRECKINRIDGE” was not. the worst movie of 1970 and, in fact, it doesn't even make my list of the 10 Worst‐ Films of the Year. Not that “Myra Breckinridge” isn't awful (it is), but its awfulness is of such insignificance that to label it with any kind of superlative would give it a totally inappropriate importance.

Then, of course, “Myra Breckinridge” does have some historical value, since it proves that Mae West, or her own reasonable facsimile, can still be gotten in front of the cameras and, persuaded to walk for short distances under her own, breathy steam.

There are a lot of other terrible movies that, for one reason and another, do not. merit negative distinction at this time of year. “The Adventurers” disqualified itself from all dark honors by more or less admitting its failures even before it opened in New York. (It was slightly re‐edited after a press pre view at which the audience became unruly.) “Song of Norway” is, heaven knows, witless, but I. find it difficult to become unhinged by lambs, waterfalls; sunsets, fjords children mountains, ducks and snow Nobody who goes to see “Song, ‘of Norway” is going to ‘expect anything else.

On the other hand, people who go to see “Joe” are probably anticipating some thing more than schizophrenic sensationalism, and they get something more, at least in the extraordinary performance of. Peter Boyle, which is enough to take the curse off “of an otherwise simple‐minded, almost ‐irresponsible movie. I didn't much like “Ryan's Daughter,” but ‘ it has about it—in its preoccupation. with vast seascapes, moody weather and an earth given to sympathy **** —a kind of well‐ordered romanticism that is essential ly harmless except, possibly, to the stockholders of M‐G‐M (although I understand the movie is making money).

All of this is by way of a preface for the annual exercise in bile called The 10 Worst Films of the Year a list that is, strangely enough, not all that easy to compose. For one thing, I didn't actually see every potentially terrible movie of 1970 I somehow missed, both “Dirty Dingus Magee” and Armando Bo's “Tropical Ecstasy.” For another thing, a lot of movies that seemed dreary at the time I. was looking at them begin to seem not quite so terrible in retrospect, if only because remember with some fond ness an attitude that was momentarily right or a performance that was unusual. “The Magic Garden of Stan ley Sweetheart” is dirty in a completely unenlightened, opportunistic way, but it contains several honest scenes featuring a sexually rapacious, overweight Barnard girl, made beautifully comic and sad, by Holly Near.

Actually most movies,, like most anything else, are neither very, very bad nor very, very good. They tend to fall into that vast middle ground of forgettableness, where, if one really tries, one can rank “Burn”, higher than “Cromwell,” “Homer” higher than “Adam at 6 A.M.,” and “Cotton Comes to Harlem” higher than “They Call Me Mister Tibbs.” One is likely to go crackers, however, trying to decide whether or not “Cotton Comes to Harlem” is better than “Burn,” or even if it has any, relation to it.

It's necessary then to stick to the really unpleasant movies. These are the movies to which I react rather like ‘the ‘mother I overheard, but did not see, one morning last fall as she was apparently taking the air on one end of her terrace while her small daughter played at the other end. “Yes,” said the mother with calm, Dr.Spock authority, “that's a flower . . . It's a sunflower . . Isn't it pretty? Be careful now. Don't hurt the sunflower . . . don't do that. Don't pick at the petals! Stop it! Dammit, don't pull the ------ petals off the ----- sunflower!” This was followed by the sound of rapid movement and a magnificent eruption of tears.

Watching a movie go wrong, I feel my patience draining away much as did the patience of, the mother who, although she loved her child; simply did not want to see another innocent object mutilated in the interests of self‐discovery. or of some, sort of short‐term pleasure principle.

The following, 10 films, each of which was innocent until it was made,, are, if not the 10 worst films of the year, them the 10 most cheer less. They are listed in the order in which they opened in New York.

Zabriskie Point, directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, written by Mr Antonioni, Fred Graham, Sam Shepard, Tonino Guerra and. Clare Peploe. Mr Antonioni's first American filth (and probably his last, at least for a while) is not really about Darla, a sweet aimless girl who runs flat footedly nor about Mark, the young revolutionary whom she meets in the desert and with whom she falls In love. Nor is rt about macadam highways, though it includes a lot of beautiful aerial shots of roads snaking into the distance. It is about America Today, its material affluence and its emotional poverty, its bizarre billboards, its violence and its fondness for things like Look magazine. freezers, Danish modern furniture and books. Although Mr. Antonioni spent months traveling around the **** try to research, his film, he probably could have obtained the same insights by watching prime time American television for one. week at the St. Regis Hotel and then shooting the entire film in Spain.

Airport, directed by George Seaton; screenplay by Mr. Seaton, based on the novel by Arthur. Halley An all star cast, a lot Of under developed (and thus phony) plot complications, some really idiotic dialogue, and a fondness for split screens —all combine to make this movie look like the world's first 137‐minute, 70 millimeter television commercial. The product is the Boeing 707 and it costs $8‐million, at the factory.

Getting Straight, directed by Richard Rush. based on the novel by Ken Kolb. Elliott, Gould as a liberated, Vietnam vet, a sort of con temporary Stover at State U. The kid wants to go straight, but the Establishment is so sick, so out of it that when Dink, who is into teaching, is questioned by some clown professor about homosexuality in Fitzgerald, well, man, Dink busts out and joins the general tear‐up of the Ad ministration Building, or some such place. The whole thing is photographed in what is called “rack‐focus,” a pre‐teen movie technique that guides the attention of the audience by bringing characters, who are within the same frame, in and out of the camera's focus. The effect is to impose arbitrary choices the audience, much as the screenplay imposes arbitrary attitudes on its characters. its characters.

The Things of Life (Les Chose De La Vie), directed by Claude Sautet; screenplay by Paul Guimard, Jean‐Loup Dabadie and Mr. Sautet. Michel Piccoli lies dying in an auto accident for 90 Minutes, thinking. back Over the things of his life that include his mistress (Romy Schneider), and his Wife (Lea Messati) and the sort of problems most Other men— who not have Piccoli's charm Women, money and looks—would envy It's all Well‐made; chic and terribly, terribly, vacuous, reminding us that the French, usually when “We aren't looking, can Make movies that are as handsome, technically proficient and empty as any of ours. In France it was awarded the Prix Delluc.

“R.P.M.” directed by Stanley Kramer; screenplay by Erich Segal. I admit “R.P.M.” to he a sentimental choice, at least partially. What would this list be without something by Stanley Kramer? Actually, this is not Mr. Kramer's worst film; although Anthony Quinn, and Ann‐Margret are quite absurd as an elderly, Would‐be‐hip college prez and his young mistress. Mr. Kramer and Mr. Segal raise a lot of relevant questions about contemporary university life, but instead of answering them rather glibly (see “Getting Straight”), they straddle them, which may be the only thing an honest, 1940's liberal can do. The one gut question the movie answers is whether or not Ann‐Margret should sleep with Mr. Quinn after he has finked on the campus rebels., In the answer, there is some point being made about sexism, but I'm not at all that I know what it is.

Tora! Tora! Tora!, directed by Richard Fleischer, Japanese sequences by Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku; screenplay by Larry Forrester, Hideo Oguni and Ryuzo Kikushirna, based on “Tora! Tora! Tora!” by Gordon W. Prange, and “The Broken Seal” by Ladislas Farago. I think I could have forgiven all of the stilted nonsense of the first half of the film, in which the events leading up to Pearl Harbor are presented as dramatizations of official documents, had the last half done justice to the Japanese attack in purely movie terms. The Old time newsreels are better.

Sunflower, directed by Vittorio De Sica; screenplay by Antonio Guerra and Cesare Zavattini Remember what happened, to Napoleon outside Moscow? Apparently Mr. De Sica, Sophia Loren, Marcello  Mastroianni and the small army of Italian movie people (who went to the Soviet Union to film this Enoch Arden story an the very steppes where it happened) didn't.  Another movie like this, on top of “A Place for Lovers,” and Mr. De Sica may be forced into retirement.

I Never Sang for My Father, directed by Gilbert Cates; screenplay by Robert Anderson, based on his Play. Real, recognizable problems about family responsibility are here defined by a group of essentially small, humorless characters is who jet least for me) are not particularly moving. Mr. Anderson's graceless creations display their emotions as if they wore letter‐sweaters won in life's big potato race. A worthy successor to “The Subject Was Roses,”

WUSA, directed by Stuart Rosenberg; screenplay by Robert Stone, based on his novel. Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward and Anthony Perkins in a well‐meaning wanting to the effect that this country is about to be taken. over by some creepy people who run a right‐wing radio station in New Orleans. I don't think that's what the movie is really about, but it's the only level on which it makes any sense at all. A sincere mess.

Alex in Wonderland, directed by Paul Mazursky; screenplay by Mr. Mazursky and Larry Tucker. Mr. Mazursky and Mr. Tucker are not only writers and producers, they are extraordinary con artists. Not. having a movie to mike, they conned M‐G‐M into financing it, Federico Fellini and Jeanne Moreau into playing‐Cameos in it, and Donald Sutherland into starring in it The result isn't really a Movie, but a lot of random thoughts about movies. In spite of some very funny incidental stuff, Mr. Mazursky and Mr. Tucker are doing nothing more than tearing the petals off a sunflower.

 

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2 hours ago, 37kitties said:

I think you're very wrong about that. I worked with a man whose name was Dimson - but it had been anglicized from the original Dimopoulis - and he was almost the spitting image of Jason. A very distinguished-looking gentleman of Greek ancestry - and very handsome in the Robards way. Same size and build too.

Jason Robards "handsome?"  Maybe on another planet but on this one he looks like a haggard basset hound who drinks too much.

(My apologies to basset hound lovers).

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8 hours ago, ElCid said:

I'll have to check these out.  Can't remember which ones, but the Drummond movies I watched some years ago were not impressive.

I find them generally quite enjoyable but they are definitely not the type of movies which are impressive or memorable. They are simply a nice way to spend an hour.

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Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

 

A reclusive underground musician is feeling the weight of his years. His wife comes to comfort him.

This is a perfectly lovely movie with neither action nor plot. The cinematography is ethereal. It is gentle humor and quiet wisdom. A reviewer on: IMDb.com said it is: "of mood and metaphor" and I can think of no higher compliment. It is imagery, atmosphere and comfortable romance. It evokes empathy for the characters. It is entering a world which has a love/hate relationship with our own.

Some viewers may have heard of some of the members of the cast: Tilda Swinton, Mia Wasikowska, John Hurt, Tom Hiddleston and Anton Yelchin.

8.6/10

I am sorry to say that I can find it only on subscription streaming services at this time. "Currently you are able to watch "Only Lovers Left Alive" streaming on Amazon Prime Video, Sundance Now, DIRECTV, Spectrum On Demand, AMC Plus."

I suggest that any who wish to experience the simple innocence of this wonderful movie search for the title on whichever subscription streaming service they have and do not read any blurb/synopsis before beginning the movie.

In like manner I respectfully request that no one here give any spoiler concerning any characters' background or nature.

 

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5 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

I am sorry to say that I can find it only on subscription streaming services at this time. "Currently you are able to watch "Only Lovers Left Alive" streaming on Amazon Prime Video, Sundance Now, DIRECTV, Spectrum On Demand, AMC Plus."

I borrowed the DVD from my local public library.

Made a copy of it too - added that to my collection.

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4 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Since Vincent Canby's worst films of 1969 got a  strong reaction yesterday, I am providing the only other worst list he was able to do: The Worst films of 1970, posted here :

Canby's full of ****.

Both WUSA and Getting Straight were terrific. Zabriskie and I Never Sang for My Father were decently interesting. Alex in Wonderland was trippy to watch high and Tora Tora was a good one for war history buffs to get into.

Gawd, I hate critics.

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GIFT of GAB 1934 UNIVERSAL directed by Karl Freund 71 minutes with many stars leading  stars are Edmund Lowe and Gloria Stuart with support by Binnie Barnes Paul Lukas  Chester Morris 'Bela Lugosi Boris Karloff (billed as Karloff as Universal were billing him after Frankenstein) Lugosi and Karloff do not appear together and are  in very short scenes . A fast talking con man talks his way to be on a national radio show. A curio   6/10

 

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ST MARTIN'S LANE 1938 UK Directed by Tim Whelan  starring Charles Laughton Vivien Leigh Rex Harrison aka Sidewalks  of  London picked up for release in 1940 by Paramount for a few years (probably to cash in on Vivien Leigh) Laughton co-produced and co wroteb the screenplay-uncredited though. 85 minutes Very good film about a comedian discovering a young talent. Leigh one year before GWTW  is beautiful with hardly any make up ,and in black & white,There is a scene in the movie very similar of her stretching in bed in GWTW.Harrison is 3rd billed  and does not do much,the 2 leads are terrific.  7.75/10

 

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The Yellow Balloon 1952 UK release directed by J Lee Thompson Kenneth More William Sylvester Andrew Ray Bernard Lee. Good drama, suspensful-thriller.A kid feels he could be found responsible for the death of his friend.He is the victim of a blackmailer.Kenneth More has a more low-key role as the father but More is always good. 80 minutes 7/10

 

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7 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Kerr's tush scene is relatively tame in THE ARRANGEMENT, done as it is in a gauzy, "European" way, nothing to blush over except knowing that this is the distinguished Miss Deborah Kerr's behind and not, say, Jayne Mansfield's.

Bare bum is not a phrase one would associate with Miss Deborah Kerr, though she likely had one.

BN is one of my least favorite two letter abbreviations. I was just watching Jayne Mansfield in Too

Hot to Handle, a British crime film from 1960. She's fairly good in it, though playing a employee of

a strip club isn't much of a stretch. 

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DUEL in  the JUNGLE 1954 Directed by George Marshall   Dana Andrews Jeanne Crain David Farrar George Coulouris. Good action filmed in then Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia).Andrews is an investigator on a mission from an insurance company to verify the death of a policy holder there. 105 minutes7/10

 

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13 hours ago, TomJH said:

Jason Robards "handsome?" 

Handsome can have a broader meaning than just pretty. Handsome infers mood, personality as well as appearance. I consider Angelica Huston a handsome woman.

I like Jason Robards, he seems highly intelligent , thoughtful and I'm drawn to his face.

41580-actor-jason-robards-1976.jpg?fm=jp

1HY059_003_lt.jpg?1456537398

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