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BLONDE ICE 1948  B movie  original film studio is Films Classics (for real!) Directed by Jack Bernhard  Leslie Brooks James Griffith. Very good film Noir considered lost for a long time,my print was ok but not the remastered one done in the early 2000's. So i can not compare.  Leslie Brooks  is a sultry, gorgeous femme fatale.I liked the film but i was not satisfied with the ending.  Brooks married one of the actors and stayed married with him for more than 50 years. She was in The Scar  with Paul Henreid and Secret of the Whistler.She quit the industry after the Scar in 1948 the same year as Blonde Ice. 7/10

 

 

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I watched Night of the Demon and Curse of the Crimson Alter, both on TCM yesterday during their "cult" festival. I've seen the former many times and own the DVD. I haven't seen the latter film in many years. 

Night (aka Curse) of the Demon (1957) is a great film, and I believe TCM showed the longer, British version (UK and US versions are on my DVD). It's a well known movie with a great cast, directed by Jacques Tourneur, beautifully shot in glorious black-and-white. Although there are those who feel that the demon should not have been shown, I totally disagree. I think it is one of the best demons!  And we see it depicted in the various demonology books that are shown anyway. The film also features one of my favorite English actresses: Athene Seyler, who plays Dr. Julian Karswell's mother. (Some might know her from her role as Lady Beatrice in Make Mine Mink.) One annoying aspect of the film: Dana Andrews, who gives a good performance, is just over-the-top rude at the seance. His skepticism goes too far, and he should have kept his mouth shut, out of politeness if nothing else. I do love that seance, and the amusing performance of "Cherry Ripe" which is sung to entice the spirit. The lyrics are by Robert Herrick, who gave us "Gather ye rosebuds..."  All in all, a great story and film.

Best-Occult-Movies-That-You-Should-Watch

Curse of the Crimson Alter aka The Crimson Cult (1968) is a good film, but not particularly special. It echoes themes that have been better presented in other films, e.g. City of the Dead/Horror Hotel, etc.  A man goes to a village to look for his missing brother and finds witchcraft.  He also finds T-and-A, up close and personal! The film has a great cast, including Boris Karloff in one of his final roles, Christopher Lee, Barbara Steele, and Michael Gough. The leads are Mark Eden and Virginia Wetherell (whose t-and-a are on view).  There are loose ends, e.g. that wild party at the beginning, which is sort of a red herring, though I think the producer wanted to give us some titillation. (The Devil Rides Out was made the same year, and it's a more original film, also about demons and witchcraft in the English countryside.)

Speaking of the producer, he's Tony Tenser, who produced many great British films, including two of the best British horror films: Witchfinder General and The Blood on Satan's Claw. Tigon Studios gave Hammer a run for its money. I think Witchfinder General is one of the best and perhaps the most tragic horror movie ever made, depicting as it does at the end, the total corruption of good (even the audience is corrupted). It's best seen in the UK print. Tigon's The Blood on Satan's Claw is my favorite of the horror in the English countryside genre. Terrifying at times, with one truly shocking scene.

But a word about Disciple of Death (1972), a film I saw long ago but glimpsed briefly recently. It's the lowest of low budget films, it's poorly made, but it has something -- a "je ne sais quoi." It also has, out of the blue, one of the most peculiar (and hilarious) scenes in any horror movie, ever: in the middle of the rural 18th century English countryside, Nicholas Amer as Melchisidech the Cabalist: "Trinity, schminity. This is your kosher, Yiddisher magic."

Here's a critic's comment about Disciple of Death: 

Disciple of Death is the worst film I have ever seen. It is quite simply a stinker of remarkable ineptitude – featuring the worst performance by a leading man in the history of celluloid (Mike Raven), some truly pitiful special effects, a story which beggars belief and camerawork and direction which… well, I despair." -- Chris Wood

06fbdb70cba961881383c34023be6260cb4f9e85

Barbara Steele in Curse of the Crimson Alter 

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The Big Caper (1957)

 

A con man decides to branch out into bank robbery and enlists his partner's reluctant help.

This is listed as: film-noir. I suppose it does meet some person's concept of the criteria. I found it to be more along the lines of a soap-opera loaded with talk of crime with virtually no action. The caper itself is a huge yawn with no tension. The few incidents of fighting were poorly choreographed and quite unbelievable.

Rory Calhoun is far from my idea of either a confidence man or a burglar. James Gregory is suitable in his role but it would have been much better if he had not had to add certain elements of psychopath in his portrayal. I never did figure out what Corey Allen's character was supposed to be. I found Robert H. Harris the most believable as a gin-addled pyromaniac. 

4.4/10

I believe that this movie is currently available only on: Amazon Prime Video but I think that this is no great loss as I can not recommend it on any level.

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7 hours ago, Swithin said:

Although there are those who feel that the demon should not have been shown, I totally disagree. I think it is one of the best demons!

Best-Occult-Movies-That-You-Should-Watch

Most of the time, showing the "demon" or "ghost" is deadly to a movie, often it pulls you out of "belief" all you see is a man in a rubber costume or special effect. But something about this movie creates the most startling, memorable reveal of a monster. For years all I could remember is "the monster in the fog on the railroad tracks at the end" of some movie. 

Rewatching, it still has the same impact. Must be the build-up of pace & editing. I credit Tourneur.

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Last week I watched Spike Lee's NYC EPICENTER 9/11-2020. It wasn't really a documentary or a movie, but instead Spike's homage to his City and the people who live & work there. I recall seeing very little about 9/11 but instead seemed more like a recap of 2020.

Although 2020 is pretty fresh in our minds, it still was nice to see those who had to deal with it in truly the "epicenter"- the world's most populous City where close contact/confinement is an every day aspect of living.

Many every day workers were interviewed, all introduced wearing masks, then removing them as they were filmed speaking. You could experience the terror, confusion & desperation so many felt trying to stay on top of it, often failing. The interviews were in sections, some concentrating more on hospitals, others on jobs and then the rise of BLM protests during the lockdown and lastly, a look at Cuomo's handling of the year.

Mostly this is Spike Lee's thank you to his neighbors, acknowledging the difficult work, their suffering and showing us really, we ARE all fighting the same fight. While not the best documentary in a technical sense, I felt Spike's need to simply show some of what he sees as "the best in people" - those dedicated to community, making the world a better place- was heartfelt & touching.

spikelee.jpg?resize=620,337&ssl=1

I love you Spike. Thanks for making movies.

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8 hours ago, Swithin said:

06fbdb70cba961881383c34023be6260cb4f9e85

Barbara Steele in Curse of the Crimson Alter 

For some reason I expect her to take off that headdress and have bright orange hair like Joan Crawford in Torch Song.

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15 hours ago, Swithin said:

I watched Night of the Demon and Curse of the Crimson

Night (aka Curse) of the Demon (1957) is a great film,

Curse of the Crimson Alter aka The Crimson Cult (1968) is a good film, but not particularly special. It echoes themes that have been better presented in other films, e.g. City of the Dead/Horror Hotel,

06fbdb70cba961881383c34023be6260cb4f9e85

Barbara Steele in Curse of the Crimson Alter 

to me, it makes no nevermind whether or not they show the TITULAR demon at the climax of NIGHT OF THE DEMON, the movie JACQUES TOURNOUR (sp?) has directed up to that point has been so masterful and engrossing, that he can get away with a "shark swallowing a scuba tank moment."

you may enjoy this audiobook of the source material;

I also checked out THE CURSE OF THE CRIMSON ALTAR and I have to say- JESUS H. how many times did they remake HORROR HOTEL/CITY OF THE DEAD?????

I think you do it some disservice in not mentioning the beefy guy in the INTERNATIONAL MALE CATALOGUE EXECUTIONER'S COSTUME, he was really out there doing his most for Queen and Country. 

Call me a pedant of the occult if you will, but i found the PHEASANT (?) FEATHERS in BARBARA STEELE'S headdress to be distracting anachronistic. (note: i think they were pheasant feathers, they were long and curled, maybe it's some British game bird, but the pattern on them looks like a pheasant to me; you ornithological pedants out there, feel free to correct me. )

i've just never known PHEASANTS, or any other ground-dwelling game bird to be associated with THE KINGDOM OF DARKNESS or THE DEVIL, feel free to correct me on that if I am wrong.

it sort of speaks to me of an OUTDOORS CHALLENGE on DRAG RACE.

See the source image

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think you do it some disservice in not mentioning the beefy guy in the INTERNATIONAL MALE CATALOGUE EXECUTIONER'S COSTUME, he was really out there doing his most for Queen and Country. 

Call me a pedant of the occult if you will, but i found the PHEASANT (?) FEATHERS in BARBARA STEELE'S headdress to be distracting anachronistic. they were long and curled, maybe it's come British game bird, but the pattern on them looks like a pheasant to me.

You are quite right to chastise me for not mentioning that guy in his thong!  Here's a photo that doesn't quite do him justice.

Btw, the woman holding what I thought was a chicken is billed as "Girl with Cockerel."

MV5BZDllZGE0MDAtZGFlMi00ZDYzLWFhNjgtYTVm

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18 hours ago, Swithin said:

Although there are those who feel that the demon should not have been shown, I totally disagree. I think it is one of the best demons!

I'd never seen the film before, and what particularly struck me was how unexpectedly beautiful, dreamlike, and even poetic the conception, lighting, and special-effects work were in all those demon-appearance scenes.  I guess I had been bracing myself for something disappointingly cheesy, and was instead reminded more of something like, say, Jean Cocteau's La Belle et la Bête, where a great deal of loving care had clearly been put into making such scenes as hauntingly expressive as possible, rather than merely "scary."

A good reminder that memorable artistry exists in every genre of filmmaking.

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On 9/10/2021 at 9:15 PM, SansFin said:

Young Frankenstein (1974)

 

A doctor leaves his teaching position to dedicate himself to applied research after he inherits his ancestral home.

I decided to re-watch this after reading a snippet that Teri Garr is the last surviving member of the primary cast. 

I must admit that: "Blücher" still does make me giggle a little bit but the remainder of the movie has moved from riotous laughter to being a comfortable friend. It is not so much that the humour is dated as happens to so many other movies but that repeated watchings and immersing myself into it so totally means that the oddities seem perfectly natural.

8.2/10

I am sorry to say that I believe that: Amazon Prime Video is the only streaming service now carrying it.

 

Interesting. As I was reading I was thinking something I have always thought, namely, that this movie is without doubt one of the funniest movies ever made. You imply the same thing and indicate that this is still so, but not because of the usual cliche,"I've seen it so many times" but that the humor has become disabled somehow. I detect a kind of a twist there (from the usual), I wonder if I have movie like that. I gather that in your opinion the brilliance is still there. I am not one to watch a movie multiple times. I don't know of a movie ever that I have watched more than three times beginning to end. And of those very few. So maybe not have viewed any one film so many time makes me exempt of the experience.

But in the thinking about it, come to mind my very favorite movie of all time, probably.  LA NUIT DE VARENNES (1983), a stuffy (as some say( rather talky historical story set during the French Revolution. I haven't watched it repeatedly because for many years it was not available, even now it has not been released on DVD at least according to my latest look. But it is available on the Criterion Channel and this is great thing. I am in the habit of checking the 'leaving soon' notice on this channel so I can be sure to have still another look. But it is not a comedy and I'm not sure that it can be measured in the same context. I have never "reviewed" this on the forum because I'm so enraptured with it I don't know where to begin. It just seems a daunting task.

Meanwhile, I'll search my memory banks for something akin to "from riotious laughter to comfortable friend." Or from intense and enraptured attention to comfortable friend. I will certainly concede that has not even begin to happen with LNDV.

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On 9/11/2021 at 12:15 AM, SansFin said:

Young Frankenstein (1974)

I must admit that: "Blücher" still does make me giggle a little bit but the remainder of the movie has moved from riotous laughter to being a comfortable friend. It is not so much that the humour is dated as happens to so many other movies but that repeated watchings and immersing myself into it so totally means that the oddities seem perfectly natural.

I used to think that one gag of Marty Feldman sticking his head back out one last time and saying "....Blucher! 😃" was directed at the horses, until I got to watch it with a cult theater audience that was already whinnying on cue.  Feldman's fourth-walls in the movie wouldn't have been as funny if anyone else had been doing them.

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In the "First Film That Comes to Mind" thread, Laffite gave a clue ("Lots and lots of fairies") that reminded me of a favorite film. The film, Kingdom of the Fairies (1903), is one of the pioneering films of Georges Melies. I can watch this nearly 17-minute film again and again. It's charm and style beats just about anything made today.

 

 

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On 9/11/2021 at 1:26 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

African killer bees are on their busy little way to Texas.

This Irwin Allen schlockfest cannot be ignored, try as one might.  Pipe the cast:  Richard Widmark, Henry Fonda, Olivia de Havilland, Jose Ferrer, Fred MacMurray, Michael Caine, Ben Johnson, Richard Chamberlain, Brad Dillman, Katherine Ross, Patty Duke Astin, Slim Pickens, Lee Grant.

Listen to Widmark ring the changes on "What the HELL is going on?"  See Jose Ferrer covered in bees!  Watch Fred MacMurray (as Clarence the pharmacist, complete with bow tie) and Ben Johnson vie for the affections of schoolteacher Olivia de Havilland!  Rejoice as scientist Henry Fonda (also with bow tie) makes the ultimate sacrifice for humanity! Have your eardrums reverberate with the sound of Michael Caine shouting his way towards a paycheck!  Behold lovely Katherine Ross, who as always lets her hair do the acting! Thrill when pregnant Patty Duke Astin experiences labor cramps!  Shudder as engineer Slim Pickens threatens to cut off the town's water supply! ("You all are a-gonna not be able to flush your toilets!") Enjoy intrepid news reporter Lee Grant as she endeavors to expose The Truth!

LOL. This bomb seems to be in constant rotation now esp. on wknds. Ugh.

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THE CRUSADES  1935 Directed by Cecil B. De Mille Paramount Loretta Young Henry Wilcoxon  Alan Hale Joseph Schildkraut C.Aubrey Smith  many others. Made during a somewhat transitionnal period much talk the action is quite late in the film.remastered and great print. 123 minutes 7/10

 

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CORVETTE K 225  Universal 1943 directed by Richard Rosson co directed by Howard Hawks but uncredited. .Hawks is also the producer. Randolph Scott Ella Raines first role (the leading lady no less (she was under contract to Hawks i think) Barry Fitzgerald. The following actors are not credited : in one of his first roles  Charles McGraw,Cliff Robertson and on of the 15 roles Robert Mitchum did in his debut movie career(1943) he is  unbilled but he has 5 very short lines which is much more than the  other films he appeared in the same year. War drama .The importance of the Royal Canadian Navy during the second world war in the Atlantic,The corvettes were very important against the german subs.Good action.99 minutes 7/10

 

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On 9/12/2021 at 5:19 AM, TikiSoo said:

Last week I watched Spike Lee's NYC EPICENTER 9/11-2020. It wasn't really a documentary or a movie, but instead Spike's homage to his City and the people who live & work there. I recall seeing very little about 9/11 but instead seemed more like a recap of 2020.

Although 2020 is pretty fresh in our minds, it still was nice to see those who had to deal with it in truly the "epicenter"- the world's most populous City where close contact/confinement is an every day aspect of living.

Many every day workers were interviewed, all introduced wearing masks, then removing them as they were filmed speaking. You could experience the terror, confusion & desperation so many felt trying to stay on top of it, often failing. The interviews were in sections, some concentrating more on hospitals, others on jobs and then the rise of BLM protests during the lockdown and lastly, a look at Cuomo's handling of the year.

Mostly this is Spike Lee's thank you to his neighbors, acknowledging the difficult work, their suffering and showing us really, we ARE all fighting the same fight. While not the best documentary in a technical sense, I felt Spike's need to simply show some of what he sees as "the best in people" - those dedicated to community, making the world a better place- was heartfelt & touching.

spikelee.jpg?resize=620,337&ssl=1

I love you Spike. Thanks for making movies.

Am curious about this and will watch it when i get a chance even though i am not a big Lee fan after some of the things he's done including his childish behaviour at the oscars a few years back.

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The Hateful Eight Extended (2015) Only saw the original once and i can't tell exactly what the new material here is but i like it better from what i first recall.

Island of Love (1963) Fun role for Walter Matthau.  Thought the film was alright.  Pretty silly but i like Tony Randall.

Gypsy (1962) Dreadful.

Farewell, My Lovely (1975) Saw the original version not too long ago, and i liked that one better, but this was still pretty damn good.

Gunga Din (1939) Loved it.  Can't believe i've never seen this before.  Am telling all my friends who loved Indiana Jones as a kid towatc this,

Curse of the Fly (1965) Third and last film in the original fly trilogy.  No fly appears in this film.  Not as bad as i expected and entertaining if you like these retro sci-fi  B horror films.

Terror By Night (1946) Very short Sherlock Holmes film starring my favorite Holmes, Basil Rathbone.  Set entirely on a train.  Recommend for Holmes fans.

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I'm glad TCM showed the 1930s Show Boat, which I liked even better than I remembered. I do prefer Howard Keel  of the 1950s version to Allan Jones (especially Jones' hair), but Jerome Kern did write Gaylord Ravenal's music for a tenor, though most of us today prefer the sound of a Howard Keel baritone to the operetta tenor of Jones. I like having "I Still Suits Me" for Robeson, but miss not having "Life Upon the Wicked Stage" as a big number for Frank and Ellie.

Closer to the material, the 1936 version has Magnolia in blackface the first time she sings. Even if this is offensive today, it takes us closer to the authentic way such a number would have been performed in the early 20th century. Also authentic is the term "**** shouter," the standard vaudeville term for an act like Magnolia's. (Not singing "After the Ball," of course.) Sophie Tucker, for instance, began her career as just such a "shouter."

Robeson's Joe, though he may be seen as lazy and "shiftless" in the scenes with Hattie McDaniel's Queenie, is nonetheless a moral guide for the audience: notice his reaction shots as he in effect gives his seal of approval to Julie and Steve as they leave the showboat and to Magnolia and Gaylord as a couple.

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On 9/13/2021 at 5:50 AM, Swithin said:

In the "First Film That Comes to Mind" thread, Laffite gave a clue ("Lots and lots of fairies") that reminded me of a favorite film. The film, Kingdom of the Fairies (1903), is one of the pioneering films of Georges Melies. I can watch this nearly 17-minute film again and again. It's charm and style beats just about anything made today.

 

 

Swithin! Swithin!, most excellent, thank you! Blown away am I. An abduction and a rescue. I don't know who that Great Lady is but she seems more powerful than a mere Fairy Godmother or a Guardian Angel. She anoints the hero affords a great shield (and whatever else). And she resurrects the rescue team after their ship sinks to bottom o' the sea following a dastardly curse. Anyway she is some gal. To hell with God, I think I'll pray to her (besides, I like big hefty women). The first thing to love here (besides her, of course) is the fluidity of the humans and their movements (there are few minor skips but it took me at least six viewings to notice even one). Often in really old films you don't get this. And the costumes, wow? It's necessary to put a word in for our most pernicious villain. The witch is wonderfully pantomimed. And the henchmen, aided mightily by special effects, accomplish their cruel work. One such entity avoids a flaming sword which was declining upon his green-y head by escaping through a trap door which just happens to be there, quite magically. Other escape their demise by disappearing in a billow of green smoke. Or were they were smote dead? Hard to tell with witches. The "underwater" scene gives us a cartoon-y - eyed octapus and an equally toy-aspected whale the entrails of which were stationed the recently rescued "military" unit delivering them to the bastion from hell which housed the aggrieved Demoiselle. Along with of course a school of various and sundry "ragged claws scuttling across the floors of silent seas." The music is brilliant, a frenetically modern string phenomenon, often asserting itself to great effect with the change of scene. Some of it reminded me of John Adams. Embedded within the sound were some pretty horrific sound effects but you must listen carefully to catch them. They are quite creepy.  Wiki tells us that the last scene was filmed in Melias' (may-lee-ess) backyard (with fairy land stuff superimposed of course) and with a real horse (Wiki also tells us that the tints were hand painted). Not much screen time but nevertheless cinema's first horse. The Princess returned, the witch vanquished, the film comes to it's end but not before giving us an incredibly charming little ballet sequence. Melies was not completely unknown to me before this, but this brilliant little film took me places never gone before. I did not know he was so prolific. Scads and scads of films did he make. This one is spectacular. 

//     

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34 minutes ago, King Rat said:

I'm glad TCM showed the 1930s Show Boat, which I liked even better than I remembered. I do prefer Howard Keel  of the 1950s version to Allan Jones (especially Jones' hair), but Jerome Kern did write Gaylord Ravenal's music for a tenor, though most of us today prefer the sound of a Howard Keel baritone to the operetta tenor of Jones. I like having "I Still Suits Me" for Robeson, but miss not having "Life Upon the Wicked Stage" as a big number for Frank and Ellie.

Closer to the material, the 1936 version has Magnolia in blackface the first time she sings. Even if this is offensive today, it takes us closer to the authentic way such a number would have been performed in the early 20th century. Also authentic is the term "**** shouter," the standard vaudeville term for an act like Magnolia's. (Not singing "After the Ball," of course.) Sophie Tucker, for instance, began her career as just such a "shouter."

Robeson's Joe, though he may be seen as lazy and "shiftless" in the scenes with Hattie McDaniel's Queenie, is nonetheless a moral guide for the audience: notice his reaction shots as he in effect gives his seal of approval to Julie and Steve as they leave the showboat and to Magnolia and Gaylord as a couple.

Despite Irene Dunne's blackface, which still could be seen in the context of the type of entertainment that was offered on a showboat at the time, I think the 1936 (however imperfectly) captures the issue of racism more authentically than the the prettified 1951 version.  The montage during "Ol' Man River" is especially compelling.   In the 1951 version, we don't see these images of blacks laboring,  and the verse about the "black boss" is eliminated, as is that of the black chorus joining Julie and Magnolia in "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man."  Joe and the other black actors are often watching as a "chorus" over the dramatic events in the story, particularly the revelation of Julie's identity.  At least we see a black couple in a relationship, even though some may claim their song contains stereotypes (although my White husband says the verses addressed to Joe could apply to him!).  Magnolia's character regards her friendship with Julie as superseding race, and a later scene where Magnolia auditions, singing "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man," for a bigoted theater manager who says,   "That's a n... song," Magnolia responds, "That's one of the most beautiful songs I've ever heard."   In watching the 1951 version, I sometimes wonder, "Is race even that important in this story?"  Moreover, Irene Dunne is a better actress by far than the vapid Kathryn Grayson; Helen Morgan's fragile and faded Julie is more poignant than the glamorous Ava Gardner.   In my opinion, Howard Keel is the only improvement over the 1936 version.    In watching the 1936 Showboat, I often wonder whether James Whale is continuing his theme about social outcasts (Waterloo Bridge, Frankenstein) in this story in the compassion exhibited for characters like Julie and Joe.    It's also clear that Whale has a love for theater.  I've also noticed similarities in the humorous theater scenes, which mock the crudity of the actors and performances, to some of his focus on the "hams" in The Great Garrick.    Anyway, despite some dated aspects, the 1936 version is a superior work that's worthy of more than one viewing.

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1 hour ago, rosebette said:

It's also clear that Whale has a love for theater.  I've also noticed similarities in the humorous theater scenes, which mock the crudity of the actors and performances, to some of his focus on the "hams" in The Great Garrick.    

Good to see The Great Garrick (1937),  mentioned.    This Warner Bros.  film with Brian Aherne and Olivia DeHavilland is what I call an unknown gem.    Often the film only gets mentioned because it was  one of the first films Lana Turner was  in.     Olivia's natural beauty really shines in this film.   I love the early scene where she is reflected in a pond.  I can see the Whales magic in the film.  

 

  Olivia de Havilland hair and make up test for The great Garrick 1937 – Once  upon a screen…

 

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20 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Good to see The Great Garrick (1937),  mentioned.    This Warner Bros.  film with Brian Aherne and Olivia DeHavilland is what I call an unknown gem.    Often the film only gets mentioned because it was  one of the first films Lana Turner was  in.     Olivia's natural beauty really shines in this film.   I love the early scene where she is reflected in a pond.  I can see the Whales magic in the film.  

The Great Garrick is indeed a great, unsung movie. I love Melville Cooper's utterly theatrical performance. He was one of the great character actors. 

 

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28 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Good to see The Great Garrick (1937),  mentioned.    This Warner Bros.  film with Brian Aherne and Olivia DeHavilland is what I call an unknown gem.    Often the film only gets mentioned because it was  one of the first films Lana Turner was  in.     Olivia's natural beauty really shines in this film.   I love the early scene where she is reflected in a pond.  I can see the Whales magic in the film.  

 

  Olivia de Havilland hair and make up test for The great Garrick 1937 – Once  upon a screen… 

 

Olivia is a delight in this, and Brian Aherne is a charming ham.

 

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11 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Gypsy (1962) Dreadful.

Gunga Din (1939) Loved it.  Can't believe i've never seen this before.  Am telling all my friends who loved Indiana Jones as a kid towatc this,

Haha I feel exactly (and respectfully) the opposite- I ate Gypsy up with a spoon and loathe Gunga Din. I am forever amazed by how films strike people differently. And I'm glad there's so many-something for everyone!

Same for Showboat; recorded both versions when TCM ran them back to back and was underwhelmed by both.  But I'm sure gonna keep my eyes peeled for The Great Garrick, hopefully I'll see what everyone else sees in it.

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