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33 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Haha I feel exactly (and respectfully) the opposite- I ate Gypsy up with a spoon 

Gypsy kills. You should hear me belt out "I had a DREEEEAM babyyyyyy" I got a vibrato you could throw a cat through.  

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Haha I feel exactly (and respectfully) the opposite- I ate Gypsy up with a spoon and loathe Gunga Din. I am forever amazed by how films strike people differently. And I'm glad there's so many-something for everyone!

Same for Showboat; recorded both versions when TCM ran them back to back and was underwhelmed by both.  But I'm sure gonna keep my eyes peeled for The Great Garrick, hopefully I'll see what everyone else sees in it.

Haven't seen any versions of Showboat and have never heard of The Great Garick but i will look for them.

Yeah, i agree with your sentiment that it is amazing how films strike people differently.  Same as music and books.  I'm not a big adventure/action film guy but for some reason love the old action films based on the age of exploring (or British colonial era).

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Last night, re-watched Ninotchka (they don't make them like that any more and there is a funny personal story about Felix B. re:  my Mom and Dad).  Don't care for the musical version with Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse.  Ninotchka features Bela L. in something other than his best-known role as Dracula.

After that, I re-watched Mrs. Doubtfire.  If you haven't seen it, it ends on just the right note.  Spoiler alert - if children are involved in a divorce - think about them.  Don't expect parents to reconcile because that often isn't the reality.  Robin Williams is magnificent.

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2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

After that, I re-watched Mrs. Doubtfire.  If you haven't seen it, it ends on just the right note.  Spoiler alert - if children are involved in a divorce - think about them.  Don't expect parents to reconcile because that often isn't the reality.  Robin Williams is magnificent.

Thanks-I've never seen it. All the clips I've seen of it struck me as cloying or vapid. I do love Robin Williams, though.

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Goodbye Mr. Chips  (1939)  This was in my queue for years and finally watched it.  Nice feel-good movie.

The Red House (1947)  Thought the pay-off would be better in the end.  Sub-plot with the young antagonist buying the government bond didn't seem to go anywhere.  Was expecting a supernatural film after the spooky woods were set up and by the end i just didn't find the set-up believable.  Might've been a better film if it had been more supernatural.

Tout Va Bien (1972) Kind of have a love/hate response to Godard's films.  A few of his early ones are in my top list of all-time and others i just loathe.  Depending on my reaction i refer to him either as the former critic turned filmmaker or a critic who makes films.  His overtly political films like this, i don't really care for, because quite frankly i'm one of the few people in Portland who don't share his Marxist beliefs.  Too much of this film i almost have to laugh at, because the set-up is exactly what i would expect Godard to have, i.e. the company that is under strike of course is a meat factory where the workers of course have blood on their uniforms, and of course Jane Fonda is the big name actress used to try to generate buzz.  All of the material surrounding the strike i just find a bit silly- the workers complain their breaks are too short and they find working on a production line repetitive.  Well, no s***. As someone who worked in a factory every summer as a teen i can relate, but the experience also made me grow up more than my peers who spent their summers hanging out at starbucks.  these workers just sound like whiny teenagers who expect rewards to come quickly and easily.  Some of the redeeming aspects of this film, for me, are the relationship between Fonda and her husband which is clearly breaking down and feels honest.  The monologue of the commercial director in the film was  interesting as it was clearly Godard speaking.  And the long back and forth tracking shot at the end in the supermarket was pretty cool- almost as good as the shot from Weekend.  I also liked the set design for the factory/business which is a large exposed cross-section of the entire building and makes me think this is where Wes Anderson got the idea for doing the same with the boat in The Life Aquatic, although I believe Godard films everything within this set-up unlike what Anderson did.  I guess overall this film had enough redeeming parts in it for me to like it for what it is and not necessarily for the content.  Recommend, and not just for Godard fans.

Kim (1950)  Never realized Dean Stockwell had a long film career- i only know him from Quantum Leap sadly.  I liked this film, more for the fact that i've been to many of the places in India that this film is set in- Veranasi, Shimla, Rajastan, etc.

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18 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Gypsy (1962) Dreadful.

Farewell, My Lovely (1975) Saw the original version not too long ago, and i liked that one better, but this was still pretty damn good.

Gunga Din (1939) Loved it.  Can't believe i've never seen this before.  Am telling all my friends who loved Indiana Jones as a kid towatc this,

 

GYPSY isn't my favorite musical, but still worth watching because of Rosalind Russell and Natalie Wood.

I personally prefer the Robert Mitchum version of FAREWELL, MY LOVELY myself. He oozed coolness in there in spades.

GUNGA DIN is indeed a great film. I always want to watch it when it's on.

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7 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

Goodbye Mr. Chips  (1939)  This was in my queue for years and finally watched it.  Nice feel-good movie.

 

I definitely like the 1939 GOODBYE MR. CHIPS  much more than the 1969 Peter O'Toole musical.

I felt that the story was much more effective as a drama rather than a musical.

 

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8 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I definitely like the 1939 GOODBYE MR. CHIPS  much more than the 1969 Peter O'Toole musical.

I felt that the story was much more effective as a drama rather than a musical.

 

I only read about the '69 version on wikipedia when i watched the '39 film.  Thanks for your take on it.

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Just now, Shank Asu said:

I only read about the '69 version on wikipedia when i watched the '39 film.  Thanks for your take on it.

Well, just because I didn't like it, doesn't mean you wouldn't.

It's not the worst film out there, or even the worst remake, the 1969 version just left me cold. And I hate to have to say that, since I usually enjoy watching Peter O'Toole in anything he's in.

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Panic in the Streets, 1950
Directed by Elia Kazan.  Stars Richard Widmark, Paul Douglas, Jack Palance, Barbara Bel Geddes

Synopsis: A doctor (Widmark) and a policeman (Douglas) in New Orleans have only 48 hours to locate a killer infected with pneumonic plague.

A less well regarded Kazan film, but as relevant today as it was 70 years ago, if not more so.  When a murder victim washes up with bullet wounds, the medical examiner finds he's also carrying a deadly variant of bubonic plague, likely caused by rats that come in on ships. Pneumonic plague is airborne and the need to find the killers who are no doubt infected raises the stakes, but the police are slow to respond despite Widmark's dire warnings. I totally bought it.

PanicStreets1bbb.jpg.3751ed28327ccf8f11adbecd216014cb.jpg

 

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19 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Farewell, My Lovely (1975) Saw the original version not too long ago, and i liked that one better, but this was still pretty damn good.

 

Actually the 1975 version is the "original" as it was the only one titled Farewell My Lovely.  The first version was in the Falcon series, The Falcon Takes Over with  George Sanders.  Fairly good movie if you enjoy the Falcon type.  Murder My Sweet was actually the second movie made based on Chandler's book.  Very good movie, but personally I prefer the 1975 version with Robert Mitchum.  The music is excellent for one thing.

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I definitely like the 1939 GOODBYE MR. CHIPS  much more than the 1969 Peter O'Toole musical.

I felt that the story was much more effective as a drama rather than a musical.

 

And of course the very reason Gone with the Wind didn't sweep all the major Oscars in '39.

Because Robert Donat is so damn good in the titular role.

(...to say nothing about how good Greer Garson is in her first Hollywood film)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

And of course the very reason Gone with the Wind didn't sweep all the major Oscars in '39.

Because Robert Donat is so damn good in the titular role.

(...to say nothing about how good Greer Garson is in her first Hollywood film)

I really love Clark Gable as Rhett Butler in GONE WITH THE WIND, but I am not so sure he would have been second choice after Donat.

A lot of folks felt that the Best Actor race was between Donat and James Stewart in MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON. Of course Stewart ended up winning his only Best Actor Oscar for THE PHILADELPHIA STORY the following year.....good as his performance was in that movie, I felt it was more of a make-up award for having lost out the previous year. 

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3 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I definitely like the 1939 GOODBYE MR. CHIPS  much more than the 1969 Peter O'Toole musical.

I felt that the story was much more effective as a drama rather than a musical.

 

Truthfully, the story was much changed in the later musical version, focusing more on the relationship with the doomed wife, with very little focus on the teaching elements. Tellingly, Petula Clark has nearly 3 to 4 times as much screentime as Greer Garson had in 1939.  I actually liked both versions a lot, but the 1939 version has the edge, because the story sticks closer to the original novella.

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

Truthfully, the story was much changed in the later musical version, focusing more on the relationship with the doomed wife, with very little focus on the teaching elements. Tellingly, Petula Clark has nearly 3 to 4 times as much screentime as Greer Garson had in 1939.  I actually liked both versions a lot, but the 1939 version has the edge, because the story sticks closer to the original novella.

The music in the 1969 Goodbye Mr. Chips is actually pretty good. "You and I" is a favorite of a friend who does cabaret. Another friend loved the school song in the movie. Sian Phillips is also a lot of fun as a theatrical friend of Petula.

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2 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I really love Clark Gable as Rhett Butler in GONE WITH THE WIND, but I am not so sure he would have been second choice after Donat.

A lot of folks felt that the Best Actor race was between Donat and James Stewart in MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON. Of course Stewart ended up winning his only Best Actor Oscar for THE PHILADELPHIA STORY the following year.....good as his performance was in that movie, I felt it was more of a make-up award for having lost out the previous year. 

I think Donat was the best choice in a difficult year. Laurence Olivier as Heathcliff was a strong contender as well.

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7 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

The Red House (1947)  Thought the pay-off would be better in the end.  Sub-plot with the young antagonist buying the government bond didn't seem to go anywhere.  Was expecting a supernatural film after the spooky woods were set up and by the end i just didn't find the set-up believable.  Might've been a better film if it had been more supernatural.

I watched this one On Demand.  My own thoughts is that it's purely a psychological thriller and even creepier from that aspect.  Here is this man with this dark secret, who at first seems like a respectable caretaker of his adopted daughter, until things take an ugly turn, revealing his underlying violence and yes, somewhat incestuous desire (spoiler alert).  I often find stories where the real horror is within the individual or within a "sick" family to be more credible.  Watched this one with spouse, who as caught up as he was in the story, couldn't help ogling Julie London, speaking of illicit desires.  He thought she was a hot little number and couldn't believe that she eventually became the nurse in Emergency.

 

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16 hours ago, Katie_G said:

Panic in the Streets, 1950
the medical examiner finds he's also carrying a deadly variant of bubonic plague (snipped) I totally bought it.

I am very good friends with #2 man of our county Health Department. This was his favorite movie, he introduced me to it. He said a Pandemic was imminent two decades ago &  I wasn't surprised when it actually happened.

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16 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I really love Clark Gable as Rhett Butler in GONE WITH THE WIND, but I am not so sure he would have been second choice after Donat.

A lot of folks felt that the Best Actor race was between Donat and James Stewart in MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON. Of course Stewart ended up winning his only Best Actor Oscar for THE PHILADELPHIA STORY the following year.....good as his performance was in that movie, I felt it was more of a make-up award for having lost out the previous year. 

Years ago I read that someone said Gable did not win for Gone With the Wind because he was just being Clark Gable.

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The Greatest Show On Earth (1952)

I hadn't seen Cecil B. De Mille's circus film, often hailed as one of the most undeserving Best Picture Oscar winners, in a few years and decided to take a look at it again last night.

There's too much in the way of Technicolor circus acts and even the cornball soap opera plot to ever call this film boring. Much of the cast is to be commended for doing the best they can with their material. Charlton Heston authoritatively barks out commands as the manager of the circus who seems to hold the whole thing together. He may seem stereotypically larger than life but that's what a big top film like this needs for a central character. Heston was third billed in this production but De Mille gave him the first big break of his career by casting him in this film, and the actor was forever grateful to the old man afterward for it. (Bigger things were to come for Heston a few years later when the same director would have him parting the Red Sea).

The Greatest Show On Earth - Variety

Considering the fact that I normally find him to be a boring actor, Cornel Wilde, fake French accent and all, is quite engaging as the Great Sebastian, the aerial artist-womanizer hired for the show. His character is supposed to be charismatic and flashy and Wilde succeeds in that. SPOILER ALERT: I carefully watched the scene in which Sebastian (okay, his aerial double) crashes to the ground. It is quickly edited when he hits the ground but if you use the slow motion freeze on a DVD player you see that the stunt man actually disappears into a hole (presumably some kind of ground appearing mattress).

Betty Hutton I found to be generally irritating as Holly, Sebastian's rival trapeze artist, tryjng to steal the limelight from him while he performs in the air. Wilde, being a hot blooded womanizing type, tries to romance her, of course, while stolid Heston stands around and does a slow burn over it while still barking orders (he and Holly had been sweeties, sort of). Hutton gets excited a lot and is perhaps a little bit less high energy than usual but her character is still a general pain.

The Greatest Show on Earth ( 1952 ) - Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic  Film Lovers | Earth film, Oscar winners, Vintage hollywood

Others in the cast include Gloria Grahame as a sexy lady with an elephant act (and a jealous boyfriend in Lyle Bettger), Dorothy Lamour playing a slightly dim witted circus performer in big costumes and doing a South Seas tribute song, and James Stewart in that stereotype of all stereotypes, as Buttons, the sad clown only this one has a secret (the guy wears his clown makeup all the time - a major clue if ever there was one that something is amiss but no one in the circus seems to question it).

Highlight of the film is, without question, the big train crash towards the end. Yes, it's done with models but the special effects are still reasonably convincing, and it is exciting to see those cars pile into one another as the train de-rails. Afterward De Mille admirably captures the chaos on the ground as people are trapped or running around and lions and tigers are running loose. Heston gets pinned under some metal but, being the true circus man with sawdust in his veins that he is, he keeps barking orders while trapped, even though he could bleed to death from a severed artery. What a guy!

Circus Train Wreck Myth

With Heston down and finally passing out, Hutton will soon start barking orders at everyone. Why didn't someone slap her silly? Time for Jimmy Stewart's clown (he used to be a doctor) to step into the breach. He will work on saving Heston but I wish he had also taken the time to sew up Hutton's mouth.

There are a lot of guest star appearances in the film from the likes of Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Hopalong Cassidy and, for some unexplained reason, Edmond O'Brien as a carnival barker in the final seconds of the film. But, as the camera pans across the laughing and cheering spectators, you also spot the likes of Mona Freeman, Mary Murphy and Nancy Gates, among others. Apparently Kathleen Freeman was also in there somewhere but I didn't spot her.

In the final analysis, De Mille's big top film can still be enjoyed, corny as it may be, even if the list of superior films released in 1952 is a pretty extensive one (for me, at least).

By the way, clowns are not funny. They're creepy. But that, as they say, is another story.

The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) Original One-Sheet Movie Poster -  Original Film Art - Vintage Movie Posters

3 out of 4

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Last night I watched  AN HONEST LIAR 2014 that was borrowed from the library.

AnHonestLiarPoster.png

It's a sweet documentary about James Randi whom we lost in 2020. I'm a big fan of magic, I love the bafoonery & the skill involved in it. I come from a long like of "fortune tellers" and modern illusionists use the tricks & theatrics so brilliantly, I can't resist.

Randi was pretty much an escape performer at first, but of course like all "magicians" is disgusted by crass manipulation used to exploit people's emotions & money.  In the great tradition of Houdini and now followed by Penn & Teller, Randi focused in later life on exposing frauds. Not "fortune telling" frauds, but mostly televangelists & spirit mediums.

Even as a kid I knew the trickery Ernest Angley & Peter Poppoff were pulling, it was old carny stuff. You know why you don't see those guys on TV Sunday morning anymore? Because Randi exposed them. Thank you.

This documentary went into Randi's home & told a little about his personal life. Most of the time, I find that kind of sensationalism rude & unnecessary. But being aware of Randi & his work for decades, I was delighted to find out more about the man, his personal life. 

It was thrilling to see he lived in an Octagon House, which is a weird "spiritual cult" thing from the early 1900s. (of course I'm into those too) But looking at a still view of his structure, think it may be just a hexagon.

 

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4 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I carefully watched the scene in which Sebastian (okay, his aerial double) crashes to the ground. It is quickly edited when he hits the ground but if you use the slow motion freeze on a DVD player you see that the stunt man actually disappears into a hole (presumably some kind of ground looking-like mattress).

Wow thanks for catching that! Cool!

5 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Dorothy Lamour playing a slightly dim witted circus performer in big costumes and doing a South Seas tribute song

As I recall, it was the theme song from another one of her earliest pictures-1936's JUNGLE PRINCESS I think.

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19 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

 

As I recall, it was the theme song from another one of her earliest pictures-1936's JUNGLE PRINCESS I think.

Good memory, TikiSoo. Lamour sings "Lovely Luawana Lady" in a song that is clearly a tribute to her sarong films. It's during this number that Crosby and Hope have their cameo as spectators.

DeMille's The Greatest Show on Earth (1952)

Just Like Magic — whosyourlittlewho-zis: Bing Crosby and Bob Hope in...

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37 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The Greatest Show On Earth (1952)

I hadn't seen Cecil B. De Mille's circus film, often hailed as one of the most undeserving Best Picture Oscar winners, in a few years and decided to take a look at it again last night.

There's too much in the way of Technicolor circus acts and even the cornball soap opera plot to ever call this film boring. Much of the cast is to be commended for doing the best they can with their material. Charlton Heston authoritatively barks out commands as the manager of the circus who seems to hold the whole thing together. He may seem stereotypically larger than life but that's what a big top film likes this needs for a central character. Heston was third billed in this production but De Mille gave him the first big break of his career by casting him in this film, and the actor was forever grateful to the old man afterward for it. (Bigger things were to come for the actor a few years later when the same director would have him parting the Red Sea).

The Greatest Show On Earth - Variety

 

 

In this pic, Heston reminds me a lot of Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones.

I wonder if that's where Ford got the idea for his Indy's trademark wardrobe.

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36 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

In this pic, Heston reminds me a lot of Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones.

I wonder if that's where Ford got the idea for his Indy's trademark wardrobe.

I believe it was from a later Heston film, Secret of the Incas. But Heston's look in the De Mille film is pretty much the same. Who knows, both films are Paramount. Maybe it's the same wardrobe.

Pin by Jaycow Milliner on I LOVE MOVIES | Indiana jones, Adventure hat,  Movie stars

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