Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Regarding Gable and GWTW - I agree that Donat deserved the Oscar.  Rhett Butler isn't what I consider a starring role.  One thing I remember is that Olivia D. was not nice re:  Hattie McDaniel winning the Oscar.  But, then again, I preferred her sister, Joan Fontaine (and she and Olivia didn't get along).

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Watched Susan and God (1940)  last night.     First time I have seen this Joan Crawford and Fredric March film.   Also has a not-very-experienced Rita Hayworth (clearly the weakest actor in the cast),   and Ruth Hussey,   Rose Hobart,  Nigel Bruce (as Rita's old-man husband),  Bruce Cabot, and John Carrol.

I don't recall ever seeing Joan Crawford this animated.    She talks, and talks, and talks.     The film (based on a play by Rachel Crothers) was witty and funny,  with some very brief sad moments mostly due to the main couple having a teen child that had been ignored by her selfish parents.

My wife really loved the fashion in the film and I have to say all the gals looked  nice,  especially Crawford and Hussey.   Hayworth wasn't "Rita" yet and thus didn't stand-out as much as the others.    Wasn't planning on watching this (it started at 11:00 PM),  but once we started we couldn't turn it off so we stayed up until 1!

Below is the gown that my wife loved the most but there were many others;

aliceandsara | Joan crawford, Classic hollywood, Movie stars

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, rosebette said:

I watched this one On Demand.  My own thoughts is that it's purely a psychological thriller and even creepier from that aspect.  Here is this man with this dark secret, who at first seems like a respectable caretaker of his adopted daughter, until things take an ugly turn, revealing his underlying violence and yes, somewhat incestuous desire (spoiler alert).  I often find stories where the real horror is within the individual or within a "sick" family to be more credible.  Watched this one with spouse, who as caught up as he was in the story, couldn't help ogling Julie London, speaking of illicit desires.  He thought she was a hot little number and couldn't believe that she eventually became the nurse in Emergency.

 

Good points (including Julie London) and i can't disagree. I guess the only thing i questioned was why the main character experienced what he did when trying to walk through the woods unless it really was because the fear was planted into him.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Greatest Show On Earth (1952)

I hadn't seen Cecil B. De Mille's circus film, often hailed as one of the most undeserving Best Picture Oscar winners, in a few years and decided to take a look at it again last night.

There's too much in the way of Technicolor circus acts and even the cornball soap opera plot to ever call this film boring. Much of the cast is to be commended for doing the best they can with their material. Charlton Heston authoritatively barks out commands as the manager of the circus who seems to hold the whole thing together. He may seem stereotypically larger than life but that's what a big top film likes this needs for a central character. Heston was third billed in this production but De Mille gave him the first big break of his career by casting him in this film, and the actor was forever grateful to the old man afterward for it. (Bigger things were to come for the actor a few years later when the same director would have him parting the Red Sea).

The Greatest Show On Earth - Variety

Considering the fact that I normally find him to be a boring actor, Cornel Wilde, fake French accent and all, is quite engaging as the Great Sebastian, the aerial artist-womanizer hired for the show. His character is supposed to be charismatic and flashy and Wilde succeeds in that. SPOILER ALERT: I carefully watched the scene in which Sebastian (okay, his aerial double) crashes to the ground. It is quickly edited when he hits the ground but if you use the slow motion freeze on a DVD player you see that the stunt man actually disappears into a hole (presumably some kind of ground appearing mattress).

Betty Hutton I found to be generally irritating as Holly, Sebastian's rival trapeze artist, tryjng to steal the limelight from him while he performs in the air. Wilde, being a hot blooded womanizing type, tries to romance her, of course, while stolid Heston stands around and does a slow burn over it while still barking orders (he and Holly had been sweeties, sort of). Hutton gets excited a lot and is perhaps a little bit less high energy than usual but her character is still a general pain.

The Greatest Show on Earth ( 1952 ) - Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic  Film Lovers | Earth film, Oscar winners, Vintage hollywood

Others in the cast include Gloria Grahame as a sexy lady with an elephant act (and a jealous boyfriend in Lyle Bettger), Dorothy Lamour playing a slightly dim witted circus performer in big costumes and doing a South Seas tribute song, and James Stewart in that stereotype of all stereotypes, as Buttons, the sad clown only this one has a secret (the guy wears his clown makeup all the time - a major clue if ever there was one that something is amiss but no one in the circus seems to question it).

Highlight of the film is, without question, the big train crash towards the end. Yes, it's done with models but the special effects are still reasonably convincing, and it is exciting to see those cars pile into one another as the train de-rails. Afterward De Mille admirably captures the chaos on the ground as people are trapped or running around and lions and tigers are running loose. Heston gets pinned under some metal but, being the true circus man with sawdust in his veins that he is, he keeps barking orders while trapped, even though he could bleed to death from a severed artery. What a guy!

Circus Train Wreck Myth

With Heston down and finally passing out, Hutton will soon start barking orders at everyone. Why didn't someone slap her silly? Time for Jimmy Stewart's clown (he used to be a doctor) to step into the breach. He will work on saving Heston but I wish he had also taken the time to slew up Hutton's mouth.

There are a lot of guest star appearances in the film from the likes of Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Hopalong Cassidy and, for some unexplained reason, Edmond O'Brien as a carnival barker in the final seconds of the film. But, as the camera pans across the laughing and cheering spectators, you also spot the likes of Mona Freeman, Mary Murphy and Nancy Gates, among others. Apparently Kathleen Freeman was also in there somewhere but I didn't spot her.

In the final analysis, De Mille's big top film can still be enjoyed, corny as it may be, even if the list of superior films released in 1952 is a pretty extensive one (for me, at least).

By the way, clowns are not funny. They're creepy. But that, as they say, is another story.

The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) Original One-Sheet Movie Poster -  Original Film Art - Vintage Movie Posters

3 out of 4

I like trains and circuses so purchased the DVD several years ago.  I think I might have watched it twice.  Definitely not the best movie produced that year and not Oscar at all worthy in my opinion.  It is listed in a publication as one of the 100 greatest train movies.

I think your comments pretty much reflect mine, but I would give it 2/4.

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, ElCid said:

I like trains and circuses so purchased the DVD several years ago.  I think I might have watched it twice.  Definitely not the best movie produced that year and not Oscar at all worthy in my opinion.  It is listed in a publication as one of the 100 greatest train movies.

I think your comments pretty much reflect mine, but I would give it 2/4.

I omitted to mention in my review of Greatest Show on Earth that one of the faces you see among the spectators is that of Arthur Q. Bryan, best known to some cartoon buffs today as the voice of Elmer Fudd. His character in the film is far more excited about the circus activity than is the quiet little kid accompanying him. That reminds me of myself. My parents took me to a circus at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto when I was six or so and they got more of a kick out of it than I did. The highlight of that visit for me was not the elephants and clowns but when I got in a lineup with my Dad to meet the Cisco Kid (Duncan Reynaldo). I recall Reynaldo riding his TV horse, Diablo, around the ring with his cowboy hat raised in the air to us. This has a direct a parallel to De Mille's film when all the kids cheer as William Boyd's Hopalong Cassidy rides his horse in the ring.

Scott Marks on Twitter: "The Greatest Show on Earth: Arthur Q. Bryan!… "

Scott Marks on Twitter: "The Greatest Show on Earth: Arthur Q. Bryan!… "

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Double feature with my english mother in law the other night:

Lady in the Van (2015) Thought there was a better story in here somewhere and surprised that the real life lady in the van has her own wikipedia page.  Bit disapointed.

Ladies in Lavender (2004) Hated it.  Felt like a bad Hallmark film not worthy of the big names involved.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

 I don't recall ever seeing Joan Crawford this animated.  

I'm assuming you're not including the portrayal of her in Mommie Dearest 🤣

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

It's a sweet documentary about James Randi whom we lost in 2020.

I would like to see this. Randi was a great guest on talk shows and other documentaries. I liked when he exposed the fake psychics and mediums who prey on the innocent.

Since he was a magician he would see through the acts of these people with all their tricks. I especially liked when he showed how Uri Geller would do his famous spoon bending.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Greatest Show On Earth (1952)

I don't know why it gets so much hate, since it is far from being a bad film. I think it is better than other Best Pic winners like Gigi, Gladiator and The Shape Of Water.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I don't know why it gets so much hate, since it is far from being a bad film. I think it is better than other Best Pic winners like Gigi, Gladiator and The Shape Of Water.

Gladiator is completely overrated, in my opinion. That Russell Crowe was named best actor for that film is a bit mind boggling. When it comes to Roman Empire spectacles, I would take Spartacus any day over this one.

I can take or leave Gigi and have yet to see The Shape of Water.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've come to watching early Lionel Barrymore flicks when they show up. I've gained a greater appreciation of him. Last night in my DVR queue I watched THE GORGEOUS HUSSY (1936).

Barrymore plays President Andrew Jackson. Joan Crawford plays the apparent "Hussy". She was hardly that. Just lots of guys were on to her. Seems like every guy she crossed paths with wanted to marry her. It went back and forth between romance and politics.....and not too well in my humble opinion. Rather dull...overall...just me.

Lots of big name actors; Barrymore, Crawford, Jimmy Stewart, Robert Taylor, Melvyn Douglas, Franchot Tone, Beulah Bondi (who snagged an Oscar nomination).

The most memorable scene, for me, was with Barrymore and Crawford in a church (I went back and watched it a couple times concentrating strictly on the visuals)....after Bondi dies. Incredible setting with sunlight coming through a stained glass window. Cinematographer, George Folsey earned an Oscar nomination for his work (didn't win) but it was excellent and I would recommend the film specifically based on Folsey's contribution.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/15/2021 at 10:40 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

Ninotchka features Bela L. in something other than his best-known role as Dracula.

You should see Broad-Minded.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Gladiator is completely overrated, in my opinion. That Russell Crowe was named best actor for that film is a bit mind boggling. When it comes to Roman Empire spectacles, I would take Spartacus any day over this one.

I can take or leave Gigi and have yet to see The Shape of Water.

 

While I wouldn't say it was completely overrated, I found Joaquin Phoenix insufferable in that movie. Say what one will about Russell Crowe, he has made some really good movies. MASTER AND COMMANDER  and A BEAUTIFUL MIND are at the top of my list...but Phoenix? Honestly, I can't think of a single movie of his that has resonated with me.

But then, my not being a fan should be Joaquin Phoenix's biggest problem.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Gladiator is completely overrated, in my opinion. That Russell Crowe was named best actor for that film is a bit mind boggling. When it comes to Roman Empire spectacles, I would take Spartacus any day over this one.

I can take or leave Gigi and have yet to see The Shape of Water.

 

Shape of Water just felt like the cinematic equivalent of a Cuisinart food processor: take the eroticism and the mute heroine of The Piano, the character design of The Creature of the Black Lagoon, the basic storyline of Splash, the blood and gore of a Hammer horror film, a soupçon of tribute to Alice Faye musicals, and puree until blended. Still, strong performances from Sally Hawkins and Richard Jenkins made it tolerable.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched  AN HONEST LIAR 2014 that was borrowed from the library.

AnHonestLiarPoster.png

It's a sweet documentary about James Randi whom we lost in 2020. I'm a big fan of magic, I love the bafoonery & the skill involved in it. I come from a long like of "fortune tellers" and modern illusionists use the tricks & theatrics so brilliantly, I can't resist.

Randi was pretty much an escape performer at first, but of course like all "magicians" is disgusted by crass manipulation used to exploit people's emotions & money.  In the great tradition of Houdini and now followed by Penn & Teller, Randi focused in later life on exposing frauds. Not "fortune telling" frauds, but mostly televangelists & spirit mediums.

Even as a kid I knew the trickery Ernest Angley & Peter Poppoff were pulling, it was old carny stuff. You know why you don't see those guys on TV Sunday morning anymore? Because Randi exposed them. Thank you.

Randi did a great special for PBS Nova on his greatest cases, including what a ridiculous, conniving fraud "psychic" Uri Geller was in the 70's.  (Before a Johnny Carson appearance, Carson, who knew magic, asked Randi for advice, who said, "Don't let any of his entourage handle ANYTHING before the show."  Carson didn't, and Uri spent ten minutes on the show  looking like a deer in the headlights.  😂 )

Randi, unfortunately, was also SLIGHTLY to the left of Penn Gillette and Bill Maher as "You'll take it and like it!!" militant/snarkmeister Atheist-warriors, which unfortunately attracted the wrong element to the Skeptic movement, which was supposed to be more about exposing crooks and loonies than about making sweeping social judgments.  And in this documentary, we learn a little context, since he made it to announce his coming Out, and that he'd been having illicit relationships with the hunky Brazilian artist he'd hired for his "Spirit-channelling" sting in the 80's.

Which unfortunately pulls the rug out of most of Randi's higher aspirations in carrying on Houdini's fraud-psychic busting work:  Houdini felt personally betrayed that crooked fake mediums were cashing in on the hopeful like himself, while Randi, we now learn....gosh, a gay Atheist, who blamed everything on his dad who didn't understand him.  Don't see that every day.    🙄

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, TomJH said:

I omitted to mention in my review of Greatest Show on Earth that one of the faces you see among the spectators is that of Arthur Q. Bryan,

OMIGOD! Thank you for pointing that out- I never knew that was Bryan!

Ugh "militant/snarkmeister Atheist-warriors,  illicit relationships with the hunky Brazilian".  Geez - can we try to be a bit more subtle with less labeling? The post comes across like a teenage boy that only remembers/talks about the bewbie scene in a movie. 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, TomJH said:

Gladiator is completely overrated, in my opinion. That Russell Crowe was named best actor for that film is a bit mind boggling. When it comes to Roman Empire spectacles, I would take Spartacus any day over this one.

I can take or leave Gigi and have yet to see The Shape of Water.

 

I happen to enjoy both SPARTACUS and GLADIATOR. Though Crowe might have been a bit of a surprise in the Best Actor Category, a lot of folks thought Tom Hanks would win it. Academy voters were maybe in not so much in a rush to give Tom a third Oscar since his double back-to-back wins for PHILADELPHIA and FOREST GUMP just a few years earlier.

Which may have also been a factor in Crowe missing out winning for A BEAUTIFUL MIND the following year, as I say, the members of the Academy may have been wary giving another actor 2 oscars 2 years in a role so soon. Though Crowe's off-screen antics at the time (he got all huffy with an hotel employee) may have also dimmed his chances for pulling a repeat.

Not that I minded Denzel Washington winning for TRAINING DAY, he made for one chilling villain.

GIGI was okay, but not something I go out of my way to watch whenever it's on TV. Likewise I have never seen THE SHAPE OF WATER.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

While I wouldn't say it was completely overrated, I found Joaquin Phoenix insufferable in that movie. Say what one will about Russell Crowe, he has made some really good movies. MASTER AND COMMANDER  and A BEAUTIFUL MIND are at the top of my list...but Phoenix? Honestly, I can't think of a single movie of his that has resonated with me.

But then, my not being a fan should be Joaquin Phoenix's biggest problem.

I thought Joaquin Phoenix made one of the screen's most hateful and chilling villains. I really despised him and was so happy he got his in the end.

I will admit though, that in real life there's something about Phoenix that strikes me as being unstable. Maybe that's why he was a perfect fit for JOKER, for which he finally won an Oscar for.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I thought Joaquin Phoenix made one of the screen's most hateful and chilling villains. I really despised him and was so happy he got his in the end.

I will admit though, that in real life there's something about Phoenix that strikes me as being unstable. Maybe that's why he was a perfect fit for JOKER, for which he finally won an Oscar for.

I understand people's fascination with Joaquin Phoenix. He has a certain on screen  "look". I just can't get by the look to see his characters. I will admit I've always felt that way about Dustin Hoffman too. 

18 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Shape of Water just felt like the cinematic equivalent of a Cuisinart food processor: take the eroticism and the mute heroine of The Piano, the character design of The Creature of the Black Lagoon, the basic storyline of Splash, the blood and gore of a Hammer horror film, a soupçon of tribute to Alice Faye musicals, and puree until blended. Still, strong performances from Sally Hawkins and Richard Jenkins made it tolerable.

SHAPE OF WATER was overrated IMHO. Always like Richard Jenkins, however. Just a dumb ending if you ask me. 

With movies like this I always wonder what studios, producers and most of all, actors think the first time they read the script. If I had read it, I would have thought, "Oh sure. This has Oscar written all over it." NOT. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/16/2021 at 8:29 AM, TomJH said:

The Greatest Show On Earth (1952)

I hadn't seen Cecil B. De Mille's circus film, often hailed as one of the most undeserving Best Picture Oscar winners, in a few years and decided to take a look at it again last night.

There's too much in the way of Technicolor circus acts and even the cornball soap opera plot to ever call this film boring. Much of the cast is to be commended for doing the best they can with their material. Charlton Heston authoritatively barks out commands as the manager of the circus who seems to hold the whole thing together. He may seem stereotypically larger than life but that's what a big top film like this needs for a central character. Heston was third billed in this production but De Mille gave him the first big break of his career by casting him in this film, and the actor was forever grateful to the old man afterward for it. (Bigger things were to come for Heston a few years later when the same director would have him parting the Red Sea).

The Greatest Show On Earth - Variety

Considering the fact that I normally find him to be a boring actor, Cornel Wilde, fake French accent and all, is quite engaging as the Great Sebastian, the aerial artist-womanizer hired for the show. His character is supposed to be charismatic and flashy and Wilde succeeds in that. SPOILER ALERT: I carefully watched the scene in which Sebastian (okay, his aerial double) crashes to the ground. It is quickly edited when he hits the ground but if you use the slow motion freeze on a DVD player you see that the stunt man actually disappears into a hole (presumably some kind of ground appearing mattress).

Betty Hutton I found to be generally irritating as Holly, Sebastian's rival trapeze artist, tryjng to steal the limelight from him while he performs in the air. Wilde, being a hot blooded womanizing type, tries to romance her, of course, while stolid Heston stands around and does a slow burn over it while still barking orders (he and Holly had been sweeties, sort of). Hutton gets excited a lot and is perhaps a little bit less high energy than usual but her character is still a general pain.

The Greatest Show on Earth ( 1952 ) - Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic  Film Lovers | Earth film, Oscar winners, Vintage hollywood

Others in the cast include Gloria Grahame as a sexy lady with an elephant act (and a jealous boyfriend in Lyle Bettger), Dorothy Lamour playing a slightly dim witted circus performer in big costumes and doing a South Seas tribute song, and James Stewart in that stereotype of all stereotypes, as Buttons, the sad clown only this one has a secret (the guy wears his clown makeup all the time - a major clue if ever there was one that something is amiss but no one in the circus seems to question it).

Highlight of the film is, without question, the big train crash towards the end. Yes, it's done with models but the special effects are still reasonably convincing, and it is exciting to see those cars pile into one another as the train de-rails. Afterward De Mille admirably captures the chaos on the ground as people are trapped or running around and lions and tigers are running loose. Heston gets pinned under some metal but, being the true circus man with sawdust in his veins that he is, he keeps barking orders while trapped, even though he could bleed to death from a severed artery. What a guy!

Circus Train Wreck Myth

With Heston down and finally passing out, Hutton will soon start barking orders at everyone. Why didn't someone slap her silly? Time for Jimmy Stewart's clown (he used to be a doctor) to step into the breach. He will work on saving Heston but I wish he had also taken the time to sew up Hutton's mouth.

There are a lot of guest star appearances in the film from the likes of Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Hopalong Cassidy and, for some unexplained reason, Edmond O'Brien as a carnival barker in the final seconds of the film. But, as the camera pans across the laughing and cheering spectators, you also spot the likes of Mona Freeman, Mary Murphy and Nancy Gates, among others. Apparently Kathleen Freeman was also in there somewhere but I didn't spot her.

In the final analysis, De Mille's big top film can still be enjoyed, corny as it may be, even if the list of superior films released in 1952 is a pretty extensive one (for me, at least).

By the way, clowns are not funny. They're creepy. But that, as they say, is another story.

The Greatest Show on Earth (1952) Original One-Sheet Movie Poster -  Original Film Art - Vintage Movie Posters

3 out of 4

As a sidebar:  After most of the cast, director and producers had died, Lucille Ball was making the rounds of the TV talk shows claiming that DeMille had cast her in the female lead as Holly, but she had to drop out when she discovered she was pregnant.  That is, until someone important to the film came forward and revealed that Ball had been cast in the supporting role as Angel, the Elephant Girl.  Of course,  Ball was replaced by Gloria Grahame.  After this information was published, Lucy stopped bragging about it. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Is there ever a good one?

It's a shame, but Hallmark used to be the sponsor of highly regarded TV specials (Hallmark Hall of Fame).  That slowly deteriorated starting in the 70s, and was hastened by their own cable channels.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ISLANDS in THE STREAM 1977 Paramount Directed by Franklin J  Schaffner. George C. Scott  David Hemmings Claire Bloom Gilbert Roland 105 minutes. Adapted from Hemingway's novel of the same title It's a quiet, thoughtful tale of a rich, well-known sculptor (George C. Scott) who has gotten away from the pressures of life on a Caribbean island. Regretting the way he has lived his life, he tries to reach out to his sons and ex-wife. When the world and WWII start to force their way into his life, he finally decides to do something right.Probably one of the best acting role Scott did. The film is in three parts,The  segment with Bloom is excellent both are at the top of their game especially when you discover why she is there.

Gilbert Roland looks good at 72 then but i have a feeling most of his part was cut from the final version as there is very little of him in it. Bloom is still alive in her 90's, a beauty and an excellent actress. For the acting  7.5/10 105 minutes

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

W.C. FIELDS AND ME 1976  Universal  Directed by Arthur Hiller Rod Steiger Valerie Perrine John Marley Jack Cassidy(as John Barrymore) Paul Stewart.Based on the book by Carlotta Monti-she lived with Fields the last 14 years of his life.She has a cameo in the film.Steiger is fantastic as Fields   (I do not know if he had to drink 2 quarts of gin per day to get in the Method/acting mood).Valerie Perrine is also very good she was a talented actress she got a few good parts but not many.Now it'.s too late she is struggling with Parkinson's disease for many years.John Marley is also great as the Paramount boss,He had a part in the Godfather again as a movie tycoon but in it his horse lost his head....In the mis 70's there was a series of old Hollywood movies.This one is probably the best,great sets,costumes by Edith Head,great acting unfortunately  it did not do well then though.The film has never been released on home video and dvd due to the successful efforts of Fields' grandson, a judge in California, to keep it from public view. It is still in limbo. 8/10  111 minutes 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...