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2 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

As a sidebar:  After most of the cast, director and producers had died, Lucille Ball was making the rounds of the TV talk shows claiming that DeMille had cast her in the female lead as Holly, but she had to drop out when she discovered she was pregnant.  That is, until someone important to the film came forward and revealed that Ball had been cast in the supporting role as Angel, the Elephant Girl.  Of course,  Ball was replaced by Gloria Grahame.  After this information was published, Lucy stopped bragging about it. 

Paulette Goddard had had a fall out with De Mille while filming Unconquered with him in 1947. By the time that Greatest Show on Earth was being cast and filmed in 1951 her career was in deep trouble and she pleaded with the director to cast her as the Elephant Girl in his circus film. The director refused, with Gloria Grahame cast instead. Greatest Show would go on to become the biggest box office hit of 1952 and net the Oscar as Best Picture. Goddard, meanwhile, appeared in Babes in Bagdad that same year (no matter how bad you think that film might be, believe me, it's worse) and two years later she retired.

However, Goddard was a smart, sophisticated  cookie and she went on to marry author Erich Maria Remarque a few years later, live the life of an international jet setter and eventually die in a chateau in Switzerland. Not bad. Yes, her film career collapsed in the early '50s (a role in the De Mille might have well have helped it) but she had plenty going on in her personal life to fall back on.

I hadn't heard that Lucille Ball had been cast in the same role. I wonder if they might have cast Desi Arnaz as her jealous boyfriend in the film.

I can almost hear Desi now . . .

"Alright, alright, Angel, I saw you lookin' at that guy. You got a lot of 'splaining to do!"

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NAKED ALIBI 1954 Universal Directed by Jerry Hopper Sterling Hayden Gloria Grahame Gene Barry. Pretty good film noir memorable for Gloria Grahame,she was so sexy and almost innocent in the role,Barry's role has almost 2 personna. Despite the title there is no nudity or alibis dressed or undressed.Some of the filming was done at the Mexican border for this reason it reminds me of Touch of Evil 1958  for the mexican atmosphere,good cinematography. Grahame  is the whole film.7/10.   86 minutes

NAKED.jpg

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Ugh "militant/snarkmeister Atheist-warriors,  illicit relationships with the hunky Brazilian".  Geez - can we try to be a bit more subtle with less labeling? The post comes across like a teenage boy that only remembers/talks about the bewbie scene in a movie. 

Call it the resentment of Betrayal:  Randi's early skeptic books, "Flim Flam" (where he recounts his greatest cases), and "The Mask of Nostradamus" (where Randi not only deconstructs the whole Jeanne Dixon "prediction" industry, but puts Nostradamus' prophecies in biographical context, where they may have actually been coded messages to the 16th-cty. French Protestant underground) are worth reading, even if a little of Randi's own staged "curmudgeonly" act, and narcissistic "martyr complex" of the faith healers out to get him, went a long way.   For a time, I even followed him on social media, where he humorously griped about everything, especially hurricane insurance for Florida residents.

Sort of the same way Bill Maher USED to be funny on "Politically Incorrect", before he took it upon himself to save rational Western civilization personally, or when Penn & Teller were just satirizing the corny magic industry...  🙄

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STAR in The DUST  1956  Universal Directed by Charles Haas. John Agar Richard Boone Mamie Van Doren Colleen Gray .Fine support cast: Paul Fix Harry Morgan Leif Erickson James Gleason.Clint Eastwood appears un billed,has 3 or 4 lines.Standard fare,a gang wants to liberate a convicted criminal just before his hanging.Second billed Boone does not have a lot of screen time.Same for Van Doren in Technicolor should have been eye candy alas no..,she is clothed up to her neck.The movie is typical 50's western but why i will rate it lower than 6 is the soundtrack is so annoying and everywhere 'when they talk,when they fight,it is so loud the editor was deaf for sure.I like very much the instrumental Classical Gas by Mason Williams-1967_But this is like the few opening bars and it is bad guitar .To top it off there is also a billed actor named ,the music man ,singing 6 effing songs with screen time,Unfortunately he managed to sing all his songs and escaped the shootouts .And guess what happens with the long ending credits.?.. Also 2 sound editors are not credited ...good for them. 80 minutes 5/10

 

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51 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Not to mention International House.

Monumental Missed Opportunity: Bela Lugosi as Rasputin in Rasputin and the Empress. He would have been perfect as the "Mad Monk" -- much better than Lionel Barrymore, IMO.

 

Far better still I wish that John Barrymore could have played the mad monk rather than get cast in the more conventional leading man role he had in that film. His performance as Svengali gives a strong indication of what we might have had.

John Barrymore Editorial Stock Photo - Stock Image | Shutterstock

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PLEASE MURDER ME ! 1956 GROSS_KRASNE PROD.Distributed by DCA Directed by Peter Godfrey Raymond Burr Angela Lansbury John Dehner. Ultra cheap film noir B movie.I suppose after paying the two leads they had nothing left for anything else...ok film with a Double Indemnity flavor.For a change Burr is not the heavy but a ....defense criminal lawyer!  The print i have just seen was not of great quality. This film is in public domain.Apparently a restored version was done for dvd in 2020 by a pd company.78 minutes 6.5/ 10

 

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BUGLES in the AFTERNOON  1952 Directed by Roy Rowland A William Cagney Production dist by Warner Bros Ray Milland is the only real name Not an expensive supporting cast  Forrest Tucker Barton McLane George Reeves Very good western the best one of the various ones i have seen by Milland. the animosity between 2 officers leading to   Little Big Horn a love triangle is also very much part of the screenplay.They used several shots from They died with their boots on' owned by Warners.On the subject of Warners i was expecting their name as Milland did several with them but right after  A William Cagney Production appeared and my heart sank. Cagney productions were all cheap looking-the ones i have seen anyway -they were all black and white and there was no money on the screen.This one is an exception: in color and not too bad looking,Warners was probably footing the bill for William ,they also provided the footage from the  Flynn movie to save money.I think all of the William Cagney Production movies are in the public domain,but i guess Warners  probably holds this one but it was NEVER  showed on TCM though. 87minutes 7/10

 

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FRONTIER GAL and YOUNG BILLY YOUNG.

   BOTH, I Would Say Surprisingly Edgy and Winky. And Both, Quite Enjoyable imo. With Respect to the Former; if nothing else i've already viewed this title if for No Other Reason, - the Ending. (i) Could Watch Mitchum Carry Madam Dickinson Into their Next Features Respectively and i would Not Care. With Respect to the Latter; if for No Other Reason WhatSoever ive Already Revisted this Fiesty, Spunky Flick for the Staircare Sequence Alone, Between Madam De Carlo and Her Achilles Heel Sweetie. While Again Definitely Subjective; Incredibly Sexy, Saucy, Pretty, Cute, and Spunky Sequence in particular it is

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18 hours ago, txfilmfan said:
19 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Is there ever a good one?

It's a shame, but Hallmark used to be the sponsor of highly regarded TV specials (Hallmark Hall of Fame).  That slowly deteriorated starting in the 70s, and was hastened by their own cable channels.

Don't be so hard on Hallmark movies. I watched my first one during lockdown and was pleasantly surprised! They are well acted, well written & crafted productions. Some of us enjoy this kind of simple feel good type movies once in awhile, like a Busby Berkely musical. (BTW-I'm not a Christian)

15 hours ago, nakano said:

W.C. FIELDS AND ME 1976

I have been trying to see this for DECADES. I really want to see Jack Cassidy as John Barrymore, & can just imagine his performance. You aren't kidding it's hard to find....may I ask where/how you found this?

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10 hours ago, TomJH said:

Far better still I wish that John Barrymore could have played the mad monk rather than get cast in the more conventional leading man role he had in that film. His performance as Svengali gives a strong indication of what we might have had.

John Barrymore Editorial Stock Photo - Stock Image | Shutterstock

themadgenius1931.1909.jpg

Also The Mad Genius (1931). Barrymore's ballet master is a mashup of Diaghilev and Rasputin.

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49 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

themadgenius1931.1909.jpg

Also The Mad Genius (1931). Barrymore's ballet master is a mashup of Diaghilev and Rasputin.

Another great Barrymore performance in a film not as well known as Svengali. Mike Curtiz was the director, though, with plenty of German expressionistic influence in the visuals. You even have a drug transaction taking place through shadows in this bizarre, entertaining pre-coder.

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Pilgrimage (1933). Directed by John Ford. Starring Henrietta Crosman with Norman Foster, Marian Nixon, Heather Angel, Lucille La Verne, Francis Ford, Charley Grapewin, and Hedda Hopper. Source: MoMA Virtual Cinema.

Spoilers ahead: This extraordinary movie may not seem like a John Ford film, but there are certainly hints of themes that became more predominant in his later and more famous films, including the theme of estrangement and reconciliation. The movie opens in rural Arkansas. Hannah (Henrietta Crosman), a middle-aged woman and her son Jim are working on their farm. Things seem amicable and loving, until the son's involvement with Mary, a neighbouring girl, provokes the mother's anger: she doesn't want to lose her son to that “trash." The son, Jim, has a night of passion with Mary.

The outraged mother enlists Jim in the army at the start of World War I. As Jim goes off to war, Mary meets him at the train station and tells him she's pregnant. He wants to stay and marry her, but the other soldiers bundle him onto the train. Months pass. Hannah receives a telegram that Jim has been killed at the battle of the Argonne Forest. On a stormy night, Mary's father (Charley Grapewin) pleads with Hannah to help with the birth of her grandson. Reluctantly she does, but after that, will have nothing to do with Mary or the child, Jimmy.  

Ten years pass. Hannah's farm prospers.  Little Jimmy is bullied at school, because his mother was unmarried. The teacher tells the kids that Jimmy's father was the only man in the village to give his life during the war.  Hannah remains estranged from Mary and Jimmy. A delegation from the government visits Hannah, informing her that they are arranging a trip to France for Gold Star mothers, to visit the graves of their sons.  Hannah refuses to go, but is convinced. The diverse group of ladies, from all over America, converge first in New York, then set sail for France, where they are treated like royalty. In one emotional scene, Hannah breaks down and announces that she's not one of them, that she was estranged from her son and doesn't deserve the honours. She refuses to go on the outing to the cemetery. Instead, she wanders around Paris at night, coming upon Gary, a young, drunk American (from Park Avenue!) who seems intent on jumping into the Seine. She sees him safely home and cooks breakfast for him the next morning. (When Gary asks if she slept, Hannah replies that she's sat up many nights with a sick cow!)  Hannah discovers that Gary's haughty mother (Hedda Hopper) won't allow him to marry his girl friend (Heather Angel). Hannah sees herself and her mistakes in the situation and makes amends between Gary and his mother.

Hannah then visits her son's grave, alone and in the dark (interestingly, the cemetery, filled with white crosses, also contains a few Stars of David). She begs his forgiveness. In the next scene, she's back in Arkansas and begs Mary's forgiveness, embracing her and her grandson. She asks her grandson to take care of Jim's dog, who seems to be the only character in the film who hasn't aged.

The film is beautiful to look at, with many moving scenes, including Hannah’s hand at the train window, when Mary and Jimmy give her some flowers to place on Jim’s grave. The scenes with the other Gold Star mothers are also well done. Lucille La Verne, as a sort of hillbilly Gold Star mother, has some great (and amusing) scenes which are quite different from her scenes as La Vengeance, which she was to play so memorably in A Tale of Two Cities a few years later. A scene at a shooting gallery in Paris is very funny. An amusing scene concerning a taxi fare goes on a little too long.

Pilgrimage is unusual in that the main character is an old woman. The film was written by Dudley Nichols, who worked with John Ford on 16 films. It was shot by cinematographer George Schneiderman, who worked with Ford on 21 of his earliest movies. The film was restored by the Museum of Modern Art. 

pilgrimage-movie-poster.jpg?v=1497687245

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PILGRIMAGE_MoMA_003.jpg?sha=0449bcabc7a5

 

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Don't be so hard on Hallmark movies. I watched my first one during lockdown and was pleasantly surprised! They are well acted, well written & crafted productions. Some of us enjoy this kind of simple feel good type movies once in awhile, like a Busby Berkely musical. (BTW-I'm not a Christian)

 

Believe me, I'd love to find one I could really enjoy.   I understand (from many Hallmark aficionados) that their creative heyday was over twenty years ago, so maybe I should start with those to get a better impression.

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I have been trying to see this for DECADES. I really want to see Jack Cassidy as John Barrymore, & can just imagine his performance. You aren't kidding it's hard to find....may I ask where/how you found this?

I remember seeing it surface either on Amazon, back when semi-legit movies would surface and quickly disappear, or in the early-early days of Netflix, when Starz was half their programing.  Judging from the legal troubles, and its MIA status everywhere else, I'm guessing it was an under-the-radar accident.

Cassidy makes a good Barrymore, and Steiger makes a good Fields, but...I don't recall there really being any big revelation to the biopic, except that the Me liked the big lug, and that Fields disliked his estranged son but liked hearing California rain on his roof.  The Depression-obsession of the Nixon-Ford 70's created a glut of old-30's-Hollywood pictures (Day of the Locust, Gable & Lombard, Won Ton Ton: the Dog Who Saved Hollywood), and always thought this one had fallen through the cracks.

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Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (2021)

w/ Simu Liu, Tony Leung, Awkwafina, Ben Kinglsey, Meng'er Zhang, Fala Chen, Michelle Yeoh, Wah Yeuen and Florian Munteanu. Plus Tsai Chin, Jodi Long and Benedict Wong. And, uncredited, Brie Larson, Tim Roth (at least vocally) and Mark Ruffalo. Written by Dave Callaham, Destin Daniel Cretton and Andrew Lanham. And directed by Destin Daniel Cretton.

What, is it surprising to know that at least one denizen of this message board went to see this movie? Or, at least, admits to seeing it? 😉

And I liked it.

No surprise there because I am the right age to have had read Marvel comics in the late '60s and the '70s. Including reading The Hands of Shang-Chi: Master of Kung Fu. Which is why I have seen all 25 (so far) MCU movies. And all 4 (so far) Disney+ MCU television series. And have pretty much enjoyed them all. So, it is safe to say that I'm going into these movies already prejudiced in their favor.

Now, is it a superhero movie? Yes. And a superhero origin movie to boot. So, of course, it hits many of the formulaic points common to such movies. Including the required big battle CGI-ed climax. But it hits those points well. Just because something is formula doesn't mean it's bad.

And it is also a martial arts movie spiced with East Asian mythology. With excellent fight sequences. And, considering the filmmakers limited the connective tissue to other MCU movies, this one can be easily watched as such by a neophyte.

But what really makes this movie is the characters and the family dynamic between them (albeit a family that has more in common with the Corleone's than yours or mine (at least I hope!)). Especially Tony Leung's Xu Wenwu as the father/villain. Because he is not the Fu Manchu that was Shang-Chi's father back in the '70s (Matter of fact, both Sir Denis Nayland Smith and Fah Lo See also appeared in that comic book.). Nor is he really the Mandarin who was simply a Fu Manchu knockoff that first fought Iron Man back in the '60s. This is a new villain entirely. With believable motivations. And is well played by Mr. Leung.

And, on a side note, I don't know if streaming will ultimately kill movie theaters (the subject of another active thread), but, considering the crowd at this one, the latter still has a fighting chance. Although that may only be a case with larger scale movies that scream big screen such as this one. But, then again, I, for one, plan on seeing a double feature of Dracula (1931) and Frankenstein (1931) at this same theater on October 2nd. So, obviously, I'm not living up to that expectation.

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Watched Mary Poppins the other night and remember when I saw it as a child.  Cried (also cried when watching Saving Mr. Banks).  

I seem to watching movies about men in drag (just need Some Like it Hot).  Watched Mrs. Doubtfire and Tootsie (and just rewatched Mr. Mom - both Tootsie and Mr. Mom have Teri Garr).  I've watched soap operas (named due to their sponsors) over the years and things like that happen.  If I could find Bosom Buddies (that would continue the trend).  As far as Some Like It Hot, Billy Wilder argued with Marilyn M. over color vs. black & white - he said that no one would buy Lemmon and Curtis as two women in color.

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2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Watched Mary Poppins the other night and remember when I saw it as a child.  Cried (also cried when watching Saving Mr. Banks).  

I seem to watching movies about men in drag (just need Some Like it Hot).  Watched Mrs. Doubtfire and Tootsie (and just rewatched Mr. Mom - both Tootsie and Mr. Mom have Teri Garr).  I've watched soap operas (named due to their sponsors) over the years and things like that happen.  If I could find Bosom Buddies (that would continue the trend).  As far as Some Like It Hot, Billy Wilder argued with Marilyn M. over color vs. black & white - he said that no one would buy Lemmon and Curtis as two women in color.

The color makeup tests were not favorable.  They should have hired some drag queens as makeup consultants (but I'm sure they'd run into some union trouble and bruised egos).

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I remember seeing a little bit of the movie PEPE recently and Jack Lemmon could be seen in color in his "Some Like It Hot" female garb.

W.C. FIELDS AND ME (1976) has never been released on any homevideo medium to date; at one point it was available for streaming for a short time.  The other fanciful '76 biopic movie 'GABLE AND LOMBARD', however, was released on DVD for anyone with a yen for that one.

IN regards to BUGLES IN THE AFTERNOON (1952) it was released in 1987 on VHS by 'REPUBLIC PICTURES HOME VIDEO'.  I bought a copy recently.  → Does WARNER now own the Republic Pictures library of films?  I honestly have no idea who owns the rights to what anymore . . .

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Anne of the Indies (1951)

Colourful pirate adventure from 20th Century Fox, one of the very few films to  feature a woman as a pirate leader. (Yes, history records that there were a few female pirates). In this case Captain Providence is a terror of the Caribbean. No one among British authorities realizes, however, that the Captain is a woman.

Jean Peters delivers a spirited performance as the title character and she has a couple of fencing scenes to demonstrate her athleticism, as well. It's difficult to know how much stunt double work is involved but certainly Peters is quite impressive here. Perhaps even more important, however, are the emotional conflicts she must portray as Captain Providence.

StarChoice 17: Anne of the Indies | Manningtree Archive

Her character is presented as having been raised by Blackbeard, the pirate, and, as a result, she is every bit as ruthless in her treatment of captives as he would have been. The woman in her is awakened for the first time, however, by a French prisoner (Louis Jourdan) with whom she has an affair and falls in love only to turn bitter when he betrays her and she discovers, among other things, he already has a wife (Debra Paget). Peters will seek revenge and that revenge will be as cold blooded as that of any man (a woman scorned, after all) but then she will also be wracked with conscience pangs. Peters is reasonably effective in portraying the emotional turmoil of her character.

The film has a few big sea battle scenes (I have to wonder how much they may have edited in scenes from The Black Swan, the studio's big pirate epic of a decade before). There is plenty of smoke and canon fire and the scenes play quite well. Thomas Gomez has a great scene stealing time, snorting and bellowing, as Blackbeard. Blackbeard is genuinely fond of Captain Providence but there will be a fall out between them which will turn him into her mortal enemy. James Robertson Justice has a prominent role as Providence's loyal first mate, while Herbert Marshall plays the pirate ship doctor, his affection for the pirate queen gradually chilling as he sees her increasing vindictiveness following her betrayal by Jourdan.

Anne of the Indies (1951) | Dustedoff

Not at all a bad film of its kind and a good deal more entertaining than many of the second tier pirate films made with male stars in the lead. Even if you're not into this kind of movie you might at least appreciate this one for being a pirate film with a difference. It would be overstating it to say that Peters delivers a complex performance but, for an essentially  superficial entertainment of this kind, there is more internal conflict portrayed by her than one would have expected. Also unexpected, I found the pirate queen's final moment in the film to be oddly affecting.

Anne of the Indies (1951) - IMDb

2.5 out of 4

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Last night, re-watched the first Die Hard (only one that was really good), some L&O SVU repeats, Thomas Crowne Affair (with Steve McQ.) and the Younger finale.  

Re:  Die Hard - made me realize how sad it is that Alan R. passed away (as did Alexander G. - I believe the former ballet star killed himself).

Thomas Crowne original is a great movie (with a great ending).

As far as Younger, meh on the ending.  There is no comparison between Charles and Josh (just as Peter Hermann's wife - Mariska (sp?)) and I would like to think the Sutton Foster's character doesn't need a man to complete her (because she has a dream job).  Also missed Diana - shouldn't she have been part of the publishing house?    However, I consider Darren Star (think that is his name as well as Sex and the City - it ended on TV with me) and so I shouldn't have expected a lot.

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4 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I remember seeing a little bit of the movie PEPE recently and Jack Lemmon could be seen in color in his "Some Like It Hot" female garb.

W.C. FIELDS AND ME (1976) has never been released on any homevideo medium to date; at one point it was available for streaming for a short time.  The other fanciful '76 biopic movie 'GABLE AND LOMBARD', however, was released on DVD for anyone with a yen for that one.

IN regards to BUGLES IN THE AFTERNOON (1952) it was released in 1987 on VHS by 'REPUBLIC PICTURES HOME VIDEO'.  I bought a copy recently.  → Does WARNER now own the Republic Pictures library of films?  I honestly have no idea who owns the rights to what anymore . . .

You can also find backstage color stills on the internet.  I just heard Tony Curtis in an old Leonard Maltin interview say they had a "female impersonator" (his words) help them in their roles.  I always thought Tony Curtis looked a bit like Eve Arden in his getup - but maybe it's the way he always pursed his lips...

All Dressed Up: Beautiful Color Photos From Behind The Scenes of Some Like  It Hot - Flashbak

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8 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

 

IN regards to BUGLES IN THE AFTERNOON (1952) it was released in 1987 on VHS by 'REPUBLIC PICTURES HOME VIDEO'.  I bought a copy recently.  → Does WARNER now own the Republic Pictures library of films?  I honestly have no idea who owns the rights to what anymore . . .

Warners did the financing through the theatrical release.Warners does not have the habit to let go any copyrights,if it ended up with Republic it is probably because William Cagney did not bother to renew his copyrights for his films and as for Bugles a clause probably stopped Warners to claim one.

 

I just looked at Republic Pictures at Wikipedia it is very detailed and you will read about the byzantine trail for the movie rights they also mention several Warners films from the 40's & 50's that were in litigation then,interesting.

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4 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

You can also find backstage color stills on the internet.  I just heard Tony Curtis in an old Leonard Maltin interview say they had a "female impersonator" (his words) help them in their roles.  I always thought Tony Curtis looked a bit like Eve Arden in his getup - but maybe it's the way he always pursed his lips...

All Dressed Up: Beautiful Color Photos From Behind The Scenes of Some Like  It Hot - Flashbak

He reminded me of Eve Arden as well when he was in drag as Josephine.

When he was out of drag and posing as the millionaire he was clearly channeling Cary Grant. Interestingly, he co-starred with Grant in OPERATION PETTICOAT the same year SOME LIKE IT HOT came out.

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