Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, King Rat said:

This film was shown in drive-ins throughout the South for years. A huge regional favorite, despite the limitations of script and cast.

I can see that;  two guys get some dates,  some moonshine and along with the film,   it sounds like a nice evening!

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Once a Thief (1965) 

I set this movie up to record when I saw that it featured Ann-Margret, of whom I'm a big fan.  Alain Delon was her co-star, rather, Ann-Margret was Delon's co-star as he was the main character of the film.  I'd heard of Alain Delon, but had never seen any of his films and didn't really know what he looked like.  Eddie Muller's co-host for the evening, Dana Delany (who by the way, I thought was a wonderful guest that evening and I thought she looked fantastic), said that during quarantine she fell down an Alain Delon wormhole.  Once a Thief was one of her discoveries.  I'd just like to thank Ms. Delany for not only introducing me to Delon (who was very easy on the eyes) but to this fabulous film! I loved it.  Delon was gorgeous and I loved his voice! I didn't expect him to have such a deep voice.  His voice reminded me of Charles Boyer's. 

Right off the bat, I loved the 60s mod/jazz/hipster/New Wave-ish (not exactly sure what adjective I'm going for) vibe of the film.  I loved the jazz score in the opening credits.  The whole film retained this vibe that I found to be a lot of fun and made for not only an engaging film, but a visually compelling one as well.  In this movie, Delon plays Eddie Pedak, an ex-con who is trying to turn his life around.  He is married to his gorgeous young wife, Kristine (Ann-Margret).  They also have a young daughter, Kathy.  At the beginning of the film, we see a pair of men pulling off a burglary of a shop, culminating with one of the men fatally shooting the shopkeeper.  We do not see the men's faces, all we know is that one man is wearing a sheepskin coat and they drive away in a Model A car.

One evening, while Eddie is at home, he is visited by his older brother, Walter (Jack Palance).  Walter, the head of a criminal gang, visits with his associates, Sargatanas and Shoenstein.  Walter wants to bring Eddie back into the criminal fold by offering him $50,000 to help the gang pull off one last major heist.  Eddie turns him down.  It turns out that Walter wants to rob one of Eddie's former employers, a large platinum company.  He wants Eddie to participate solely for Eddie's knowledge of the company's operation.  Meanwhile, there are personal issues between Eddie and Kristine.  Eddie is traditional and wants Kristine to stay home with their daughter, but he isn't bringing in any income.

Eddie's inability to bring home any income is due to his history with Detective Mike Vido (Van Heflin), who still holds a grudge against Eddie.  It seems that Eddie shot him six years ago in the stomach during a robbery that Vido was never able to solve. His reason for not being able to solve the case is due to Mike only having seen the shooter's eyes.  He is certain though that Eddie was the gunman. Since Eddie was released from prison and tried to go straight, Vido has made sure to harass and get him fired from each and every job he's had.  We see Eddie lose his latest job at the beginning of the film.  Kristine tries to help out the household finances by getting a job at a nightclub, much to Eddie's chagrin.

This was such a fantastic film.  I loved the whole aesthetic.  I loved the score.  There was a pretty sexy scene between Delon and Ann-Margret that reached its peak when their daughter interupts to ask for a glass of water.  I definitely needed a glass of water after that scene.  I loved the rapport of the two leads.  Van Heflin is always a welcome addition to any film and he was excellent here too as the Detective with the grudge, but one who ultimately felt sympathetic toward Eddie.  Jack Palance was excellent as always.  The guy who played Sargatanas was a total creep and played that part very well.

Thank you Dana Delany.  I will now be adding this film to my collection and start looking for more Alain Delon to fill my evenings. Lol.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Once a Thief (1965) 

I set this movie up to record when I saw that it featured Ann-Margret, of whom I'm a big fan.  Alain Delon was her co-star, rather, Ann-Margret was Delon's co-star as he was the main character of the film.  I'd heard of Alain Delon, but had never seen any of his films and didn't really know what he looked like. 

  Delon was gorgeous and I loved his voice! I didn't expect him to have such a deep voice.  His voice reminded me of Charles Boyer's. 

I love Alain Delon!!! Yes, he is gorgeous!

He and Ann-Margret burn up the screen  just as Ann-Margret and Elvis Presley do..  HOT! 

 I'm also  huge fan of Ann-Margret  (she graduated from the same high school in the Chicago suburbs that I did).

Besides ONCE A THIEF, other Alain Delon movies I like are :

PURPLE NOON (PLEIN SOLEIL) ---- based on the same source material as THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY, but in French

ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS (which is in Italian)

L'ECLISSE -- directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

 

431ef34c830ebd83a3fe9d6cd3478378.jpg

1813b7cc2d2e984b5cee4f1837a2a193.jpg

 

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I love Alain Delon!!! Yes, he is gorgeous!

He and Ann-Margret burn up the screen  just as Ann-Margret and Elvis Presley do..  HOT! 

 I'm also  huge fan of Ann-Margret  (she graduated from the same high school in the Chicago suburbs that I did).

Besides ONCE A THIEF, other Alain Delon movies I like are :

PURPLE NOON (PLEIN SOLEIL) ---- based on the same source material as THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY, but in French

ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS (which is in Italian)

L'ECLISSE -- directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

 

431ef34c830ebd83a3fe9d6cd3478378.jpg

1813b7cc2d2e984b5cee4f1837a2a193.jpg

 

I am not well versed in foreign films as they take a bit more "work" to watch, but I may have to make an exception for Mr. Delon. Ooh la la. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

At night, a man stands in front of a bright yellow taxi while looking to the side. Underneath him, the words "Robert De Niro" and "Taxi Driver" appear in red font on a yellow background.

Taxi Driver (1976) TCM On Demand 10/10

A New York cab driver slowly goes mad while he witnesses the crime and squalor of the city.

One of my favorite films. Robert DeNiro's greatest performance. It is a fascinating character study of a lonely, socially awkward man named Travis Bickle. Some of the most interesting scenes are when we see in social situations. When he is with his fellow cabbies, he cannot always join in their conversations, he often turns the conversation back to the job and it's dangers. The cabbies all have nick names like Wizard (Peter Boyle), the veteran driver who has seen everything. Dough Boy is one who will do anything for a buck. Travis is given the nick name Killer, which I imagine was because he was a Marine, he had not killed anyone yet in the film. Other awkward moments are when Travis attempts to ask a pretty girl (Cybill Shepard) for a date, though she accepts it turns into a disaster when he brings her to a porno film. She is disgusted and offended and refuses to see him again. However due to his twisted mind and social anxiety he cannot understand why she feels that way, he reacts with anger. We never know what made Travis the way he is. We only hear his chilling yet touching narration when he explains "Loneliness has followed me all my life...I'm God's Lonely Man."

Edit- I also wanted to mention the scene where Betsy (Cybill Shepard) tells Travis he reminds her of a Kris Kristofferon song, where the lyrics say "He's a prophet and a pusher, partly truth partly fiction, a walking contradiction." The clueless Travis only sees things in a black and white way, not intelligent or worldly enough to understand  metaphors or irony so he only thinks she is calling him a pusher. 

It is due to DeNiro's performance, Martin Scorsese's direction and Paul Schrader's writing that I can feel sympathy for his character as well as being disturbed and repelled by him as well.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

At night, a man stands in front of a bright yellow taxi while looking to the side. Underneath him, the words "Robert De Niro" and "Taxi Driver" appear in red font on a yellow background.

Taxi Driver (1976) TCM On Demand 10/10

A New York cab driver slowly goes mad while he witnesses the crime and squalor of the city.

One of my favorite films. Robert DeNiro's greatest performance. It is a fascinating character study of a lonely, socially awkward man named Travis Bickle. Some of the most interesting scenes are when we see in social situations. When he is with his fellow cabbies, he cannot always join in their conversations, he often turns the conversation back to the job and it's dangers. The cabbies all have nick names like Wizard (Peter Boyle), the veteran driver who has seen everything. Dough Boy is one who will do anything for a buck. Travis is given the nick name Killer, which I imagine was because he was a Marine, he had not killed anyone yet in the film. Other awkward moments are when Travis attempts to ask a pretty girl (Cybill Shepard) for a date, though she accepts it turns into a disaster when he brings her to a porno film. She is disgusted and offended and refuses to see him again. However due to his twisted mind and social anxiety he cannot understand why she feels that way, he reacts with anger. We never know what made Travis the way he is. We only hear his chilling yet touching narration when he explains "Loneliness has followed me all my life...I'm God's Lonely Man."

It is due to DeNiro's performance, Martin Scorsese's direction and Paul Schrader's writing that I can feel sympathy for his character as well as being disturbed and repelled by him as well.

I would also like to make mention of the effectiveness of Bernard Herrmann's final remarkable musical score for Taxi Driver. The sounds of that lone sax stay with you. There is something uncertain, deep and disturbing to this score, reflecting the mind of the film's central character and his decent into madness.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I would also like to make mention of the effectiveness of Bernard Herrmann's final remarkable musical score for Taxi Driver. The sounds of that lone sax stay with you. There is something uncertain, deep and disturbing to this score, reflecting the mind of the film's central character and his decent into madness.

Totally agree on that, one of my favorite film scores. The sax solos seemed to represent the lonely character. I also like the ominous beginning to the score, as we see the taxi driving through what looks like Hell.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Wow,  didn't know there were such limits.   In the future I'll remove screencaps when using the quote feature and I'll edit the one above.

 

 

What are "screencaps?"

17 hours ago, King Rat said:

This film was shown in drive-ins throughout the South for years. A huge regional favorite, despite the limitations of script and cast.

Also shown in regular theaters, but maybe just when released.  I have the DVD and also the 45 RPM record of Mitchum singing the theme song, which he wrote.

Not a great movie, but one that is entertaining.  The geography and cars in the movie and the song don't match and the geography doesn't make sense either, but who cares it is entertaining and fun to watch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have mentioned a couple times that I thought JOKER with Joaquin Phoenix was a dreadful and poor imitation of TAXI DRIVER without the funny parts. Scorsese and screenwriter, Paul Schrader, showed Hollywood how to do a dark, character study. 

BTW, Paul Schrader grew up in my hometown of Grand Rapids and shared an English class at Calvin College with my sister-in-law back in the late 60's. She remembered him as being particularly animated in a class at the very conservative, Christian college. A few years later, Schrader kind of told Grand Rapids what he thought of it when he wrote the George C. Scott/Peter Boyle drama, HARDCORE, about a deeply Christian father who searches for his daughter shanghaied by the California porn industry. For Grand Rapidians, it was a pretty disturbing film. Many scenes shot in G.R.

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, MrMagoo said:

I have mentioned a couple times that I thought JOKER with Joaquin Phoenix was a dreadful and poor imitation of TAXI DRIVER without the funny parts. Scorsese and screenwriter, Paul Shrader, showed Hollywood how to do a dark, character study. 

BTW, Paul Shrader grew up in my hometown of Grand Rapids and shared an English class at Calvin College with my sister-in-law back in the late 60's. She remembered him as being particularly animated in a class at the very conservative, Christian college. A few years later, Shrader kind of told Grand Rapids what he thought of it when he wrote the George C. Scott/Peter Boyle drama, HARDCORE, about the deeply Christian father who searches for his daughter in the California porn industry. For Grand Rapidians, it was a pretty disturbing film. Many scenes shot in G.R.

 

I thought Joker was a pretty good film, more similar to another Scorsese film The King Of Comedy (1983) , though not as near as good as that or Taxi Driver. I wish they had just done a dark film about a deranged man, not another Batman/Joker spin off, the comic book references were distracting.

I have seen Hardcore, many years ago on a VHS tape. it was another good example of Schrader doing a dark film about the seamy side of life. George C Scott was excellent.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I am not well versed in foreign films as they take a bit more "work" to watch, but I may have to make an exception for Mr. Delon. Ooh la la. 

Yes Alain Delon is in my top 5 for most beautiful leading man in the movies,he has made many good films,he has an extensive filmography,a varied one.I think he dies in 17 of them (as he made many action films) if not more, he will be 86 in november,he was a great pal of JeanPaul Belmondo who died 2 weeks ago.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I thought Joker was a pretty good film, more similar to another Scorsese film The King Of Comedy (1983) , though not as near as good as that or Taxi Driver. I wish they had just done a dark film about a deranged man, not another Batman/Joker spin off, the comic book references were distracting.

I have seen Hardcore, many years ago on a VHS tape. it was another good example of Schrader doing a dark film about the seamy side of life. George C Scott was excellent.

THE KING OF COMEDY had some genuine humanity to it. The Sandra Bernhard character...even Jerry Lewis's had some. It had some comedy...even as it was at it's core a drama. I felt like JOKER tried to rip off some elements of TKOC. JOKER also horribly exploited a multi-generational fondness for a comic book hero/villain storyline. If they had simply made it as a character study of a deranged man, I don't think Phoenix would have done it or many people would have gone to see it. For me, they ruined a bit of the BATMAN aura/mystique. I kind of resent Hollywood for doing that. JOKER had no humanity.

While I appreciated the acting and production of JOKER,  I loathed the screenplay and basic theme of that film. I resent that I had to endure it. It felt like pornography to me.

As a follow up to HARDCORE, some thought Schrader was trying to pay homage to his Western Michigan roots by focusing on the severe Christian culture he grew up in. While I didn't have that experience, I knew a lot of people (including my sister-in-law) who did. My grandparents were particularly stern. My grandfather was very much like the George C. Scott character, which partly explained why my Mom and her Dad were often at odds. Many of us thought Schrader was sticking a thumb in the eye of Grand Rapids...which honestly...it somewhat deserved. I too, thought Scott was outstanding (when was he not?) in that film. In addition, I thought it was odd that he took the role. There was an underlying grubbiness to that film that I didn't think added much to Scott's resume. 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, nakano said:

Yes Alain Delon is in my top 5 for most beautiful leading man in the movies,he has made many good films,he has an extensive filmography,a varied one.I think he dies in 17 of them (as he made many action films) if not more, he will be 86 in november,he was a great pal of JeanPaul Belmondo who died 2 weeks ago.

Delon was a very handsome and dashing actor.    Just saw him a few days ago in The Sicilian Clan.      The film also stars Jean Gabin and Lino Ventura.

I only saw the last half and the ending and how Delon makes-outs,   didn't surprise me.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the weekend I watched two of the Jesse Stone movies one of the networks was airing: DEATH IN PARADISE and STONE COLD. I really like these made for TV films. Tom Sellick is great in the role and the supporting cast is excellent.  Viola Davis is fantastic as one of the Paradise Police force officers.  I've learned there are nine total films. CBS carried them early on and Hallmark took over at some point.  I know Robert B. Parker died and a couple of other authors have kept the character alive in books. I just read one of the novels (COLORBLIND) and thoroughly enjoyed it. While I realize there probably won't be anymore films, I'm hoping to be able to find the remaining seven I haven't seen somewhere in the future.  Are there any other fans out there and if so, where can I find the other movies.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I thought Joker was a pretty good film, more similar to another Scorsese film The King Of Comedy (1983) , though not as near as good as that or Taxi Driver. I wish they had just done a dark film about a deranged man, not another Batman/Joker spin off, the comic book references were distracting.

I have seen Hardcore, many years ago on a VHS tape. it was another good example of Schrader doing a dark film about the seamy side of life. George C Scott was excellent.

I'll have to look for Hardcore. In the meantime, Schrader's The Card Counter (2021) is in theaters, although probably not for much longer. "Dark" definitely applies to this film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter Ibbetson (1935). Directed by Henry Hathaway. Photographed by Charles Lang. Music by Ernest Toch.

I can't quite get it together to write something about this glorious movie which I have finally seen. For now, some images and quotes:

"A triumph of surrealist thought" -- Andre Breton

"One of the world's ten greatest films" -- Luis Bunuel

"This film, insofar as it shows the ultimate defeat of anything which opposes itself to love, should be screened regularly in all the movie theaters all over the world." -- Ado Kyrou

 

Colonel Forsythe (played by Douglas Dumbrille) to Mrs. Dorian (played by Doris Lloyd):

Col. Forsythe:"The desperate love between children. Is there anything in the world forgotten so soon? "

Mrs. Dorian: "I would say, Colonel, it is the last thing forgotten of all."

52975401.png

Dickie Moore and Virginia Weidler as Gogo and Mimsy, who grow up to be Peter and Mary

6a00e5523026f5883401157133ca89970b-pi

Gary Cooper and Ann Harding

arton2798-1450x800-c.jpg

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

Over the weekend I watched two of the Jesse Stone movies one of the networks was airing: DEATH IN PARADISE and STONE COLD. I really like these made for TV films. Tom Sellick is great in the role and the supporting cast is excellent.  Viola Davis is fantastic as one of the Paradise Police force officers.  I've learned there are nine total films. CBS carried them early on and Hallmark took over at some point.  I know Robert B. Parker died and a couple of other authors have kept the character alive in books. I just read one of the novels (COLORBLIND) and thoroughly enjoyed it. While I realize there probably won't be anymore films, I'm hoping to be able to find the remaining seven I haven't seen somewhere in the future.  Are there any other fans out there and if so, where can I find the other movies.

My dad is a big fan of the Jesse Stone films, he watches them every time they come on. He always said that Jesse Stone was Tom Selleck's best role for him.

Personally, my favorite Tom Selleck film is THREE MEN AND A BABY. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/20/2021 at 12:57 PM, Shank Asu said:

I want to see this solely because I own about 60 or so of the original comics from the 70 and thought they were amazing.  Not a MCU fan but i have seen a few of them (really want for WB to restore the Snyderverse!). I'm worried this film won't capture the story of the comics where there was a freelance team fighting alongside Chi - albeit not using martial arts per se.  I will probably watch this eventually but not in the theater.  I'm still scratching my head how this even got made as it wasn't THAT popular and seems well outside the realm of the marvel superheroes and in its own separate reality and there's really no audience asking for this as the original comics were from over 40 years ago.  there's a few theories i have why they would want to make this, mostly just wanting to be PC, but for whatever the reason, this might be one of the few marvel films i end up enjoying if they stay true to the comics.

If your main criteria to see this one is based upon its faithfulness to the 70's comic book, then I would have to recommend that you skip this one. Or at least wait until you can see it for free.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2021 at 12:49 PM, Det Jim McLeod said:

I thought Joker was a pretty good film, more similar to another Scorsese film The King Of Comedy (1983) ,

"Similar"?  He's got a mural of Robert DeNiro/Rupert Pupkin on his freakin' apartment wall!  

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/21/2021 at 8:12 PM, speedracer5 said:

I am not well versed in foreign films as they take a bit more "work" to watch, but I may have to make an exception for Mr. Delon. Ooh la la. 

Le Samourai (1967) is another great one.  French noir but more arty.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2021 at 3:42 PM, Hoganman1 said:

Over the weekend I watched two of the Jesse Stone movies one of the networks was airing: DEATH IN PARADISE and STONE COLD. I really like these made for TV films. Tom Sellick is great in the role and the supporting cast is excellent.  Viola Davis is fantastic as one of the Paradise Police force officers.  I've learned there are nine total films. CBS carried them early on and Hallmark took over at some point.  I know Robert B. Parker died and a couple of other authors have kept the character alive in books. I just read one of the novels (COLORBLIND) and thoroughly enjoyed it. While I realize there probably won't be anymore films, I'm hoping to be able to find the remaining seven I haven't seen somewhere in the future.  Are there any other fans out there and if so, where can I find the other movies.

My dad loves these films. I watched a few over the years but can't recall which ones. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2021 at 9:36 AM, MrMagoo said:

I have mentioned a couple times that I thought JOKER with Joaquin Phoenix was a dreadful and poor imitation of TAXI DRIVER without the funny parts. Scorsese and screenwriter, Paul Schrader, showed Hollywood how to do a dark, character study. 

BTW, Paul Schrader grew up in my hometown of Grand Rapids and shared an English class at Calvin College with my sister-in-law back in the late 60's. She remembered him as being particularly animated in a class at the very conservative, Christian college. A few years later, Schrader kind of told Grand Rapids what he thought of it when he wrote the George C. Scott/Peter Boyle drama, HARDCORE, about a deeply Christian father who searches for his daughter shanghaied by the California porn industry. For Grand Rapidians, it was a pretty disturbing film. Many scenes shot in G.R.

 

Schrader has said that there is an unofficial sequel to Taxi Driver.  Can't remember which of his films it is, but he has said he sees the character in it as Travis Bickle a few years later.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/21/2021 at 6:30 PM, speedracer5 said:

Once a Thief (1965) 

I set this movie up to record when I saw that it featured Ann-Margret, of whom I'm a big fan.  Alain Delon was her co-star, rather, Ann-Margret was Delon's co-star as he was the main character of the film.  I'd heard of Alain Delon, but had never seen any of his films and didn't really know what he looked like.  Eddie Muller's co-host for the evening, Dana Delany (who by the way, I thought was a wonderful guest that evening and I thought she looked fantastic), said that during quarantine she fell down an Alain Delon wormhole.  Once a Thief was one of her discoveries.  I'd just like to thank Ms. Delany for not only introducing me to Delon (who was very easy on the eyes) but to this fabulous film! I loved it.  Delon was gorgeous and I loved his voice! I didn't expect him to have such a deep voice.  His voice reminded me of Charles Boyer's. 

Right off the bat, I loved the 60s mod/jazz/hipster/New Wave-ish (not exactly sure what adjective I'm going for) vibe of the film.  I loved the jazz score in the opening credits.  The whole film retained this vibe that I found to be a lot of fun and made for not only an engaging film, but a visually compelling one as well.  In this movie, Delon plays Eddie Pedak, an ex-con who is trying to turn his life around.  He is married to his gorgeous young wife, Kristine (Ann-Margret).  They also have a young daughter, Kathy.  At the beginning of the film, we see a pair of men pulling off a burglary of a shop, culminating with one of the men fatally shooting the shopkeeper.  We do not see the men's faces, all we know is that one man is wearing a sheepskin coat and they drive away in a Model A car.

One evening, while Eddie is at home, he is visited by his older brother, Walter (Jack Palance).  Walter, the head of a criminal gang, visits with his associates, Sargatanas and Shoenstein.  Walter wants to bring Eddie back into the criminal fold by offering him $50,000 to help the gang pull off one last major heist.  Eddie turns him down.  It turns out that Walter wants to rob one of Eddie's former employers, a large platinum company.  He wants Eddie to participate solely for Eddie's knowledge of the company's operation.  Meanwhile, there are personal issues between Eddie and Kristine.  Eddie is traditional and wants Kristine to stay home with their daughter, but he isn't bringing in any income.

Eddie's inability to bring home any income is due to his history with Detective Mike Vido (Van Heflin), who still holds a grudge against Eddie.  It seems that Eddie shot him six years ago in the stomach during a robbery that Vido was never able to solve. His reason for not being able to solve the case is due to Mike only having seen the shooter's eyes.  He is certain though that Eddie was the gunman. Since Eddie was released from prison and tried to go straight, Vido has made sure to harass and get him fired from each and every job he's had.  We see Eddie lose his latest job at the beginning of the film.  Kristine tries to help out the household finances by getting a job at a nightclub, much to Eddie's chagrin.

This was such a fantastic film.  I loved the whole aesthetic.  I loved the score.  There was a pretty sexy scene between Delon and Ann-Margret that reached its peak when their daughter interupts to ask for a glass of water.  I definitely needed a glass of water after that scene.  I loved the rapport of the two leads.  Van Heflin is always a welcome addition to any film and he was excellent here too as the Detective with the grudge, but one who ultimately felt sympathetic toward Eddie.  Jack Palance was excellent as always.  The guy who played Sargatanas was a total creep and played that part very well.

Thank you Dana Delany.  I will now be adding this film to my collection and start looking for more Alain Delon to fill my evenings. Lol.

Watched this film yesterday and I loved it.  Great cast, setting, cinematography, story, and music.  The character Sargatanas was so creepy looking that it was chilling (something going on with his eyelashes).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...