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From the last few days:

Two for the Road (1967) Can appreciate the timeline changes in the storytelling (apparently it was the first film to jump around like this) to tell the history of the two main character's relationship, but in the end i felt like i just didn't care and felt like things were dragging on.

Exodus (1960) Enjoyed this but it was very long.  Felt like the two halves were almost two separate films.  Could probably use a mini-series treatment with an update but i think this story is now far too controversial to be remade without an uproar.  But still, i know i'd like to see it.

Brainstorm (1983) Thought it was pretty bad.  Sad ending to Woods career.  I'm curious if the special effects on this were actually mind-blowing when this was released. 

Cry Macho (2021) I like most of Eastwood's films and even as a nonagenarian is still a talented filmmaker.  I thought there were some issues with the story in general and obviously it is now a bit unbelievable to see Eastwood as a bounty hunter or breaking in wild horses at his age, even though he does look great at 91.  Nice to see him in one last 'western'.  I know he has always intended Unforgiven to be his last western and even held onto the rights of the script for over 20 years with that intention, but that was a long time ago since it was released and wish there'd been more since then.

Human Desire (1954) Probably in a minority, but i didn't really care for the story or the ending.

Dressed to Kill (1946) Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce in their most famous roles as Holmes and Watson.  Short and fun film.

The Harder they Fall (1956)  I liked the film up until the very end.  Like  boxing films set in the golden age of the sport and enjoyed seeing Max Baer in the role of the champ (after seeing Cinderella Man, I assumed he was much bigger).  For some reason i always thought that Bogart's last film was in color.

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I wish they would do more Jesse Stone.  Tom Selleck's character is polar opposite from Frank Regan (sp?) on Blue Bloods. I think that Selleck obtained the rights to the series after Robert Parker died.

Last night, I watched Law & Order SVU and Organized Crime premiers but fell asleep during them.  It's dragging a story ad nauseum.  Before that I re-watched Night Shift (Henry Winkler as a morgue attendant, Michael Keaton joins him, and Shelley Long as a hooker).  Winkler is a wuss and Keaton is a guy with a get-rich-quick scheme.  Long's pimp is killed (one of the shooters is Richard Belzer - miss him on SVU), which is how she arrives in the mortuary and meets Winkler.  Eventually Keaton and Winkler become pimps and (spoiler) Winkler falls in love with Long.  The film was directed by Opie (back to Andy G. and Face in the Crowd comment) AKA Ron Howard.  Winkler and Long were trying to capitalize on their small screen success (though Long was persona non grata on Cheers); however, Keaton steals the show.  It was cute.  Now later on, I watched Fraser repeats.  Coincidently, he was just in the Buffalo area, where I live, promoting his Craft Beer (don't like beer).

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10 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Dressed to Kill (1946) Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce in their most famous roles as Holmes and Watson.  Short and fun film.

Dressed to Kill has one of my favorite well-played bit parts: Edmund Breon as Julian "Stinky" Emery, the man with the music boxes.

Basil_Rathbone-Edmund_Breon_in_Dressed_t

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRp1bWV0cw3EmN2l__O5sx

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11 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Brainstorm (1983) Thought it was pretty bad.  Sad ending to Woods career.  I'm curious if the special effects on this were actually mind-blowing when this was released. 

Douglas Trumbull wanted it to be the debut of his new gimmick Showscan--which today we'd call "High Frame Rate" when it was used in The Hobbit--and switch back and forth between normal film and HFR for the real vs. SFX scenes.


But, that would have been impossible for 1983 projectors, so he stuck to playing with the illusion of screen width, jumping between standard and 2:35 for the real vs. SFX scenes.  That was a little more visually mind-blowing, but Galaxy Quest ended up using it in a much better film.

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I think my favorite part of Brainstorm is the scene in which one of the execs comes up with the idea of using the invention for VR sex, because in real life, you know that would be one of the big uses of the thing.

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Last night watched a film I don't think I've seen before  - Walk on the Moon (with Diane Lane, Liev Schreiber and Vigo M.).  It takes around the time of Woodstock.  It was not great but it touched me.  It deals with a question many people deal with in real life:  can you forgive a spouse for cheating.  Added bonus was Tovah Feldshuh (sp?) as Liev's mother.

After that, re-watched Regarding Henry.  It reminds me of an old Powell/Loy film where Powell gets amnesia and becomes a better man than he was before.  Harrison Ford and Annette Benning (plus the girl who plays their daughter) made a believable family.

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The Courier (2020) - Amazon Prime

w/ Benedict Cumberbatch, Merab Ninidze, Rachel Brosnahan and Jessie Buckley. Written by Tom O'Connor. And directed by Dominic Cooke.

Based upon the true story of a British businessman, Greville Wynne (Benedict Cumberbatch) who, because of his history of business trips to Eastern Europe, was recruited by the British SIS in 1960 to travel to and from Moscow in order to be the contact to and courier for a GRU colonel, Oleg Penkovsky (Merab Ninidze) who provided Soviet intelligence to the West up to the Cuban Missile Crisis.

This is a fairly low-key espionage thriller. We are definitely not in Ian Fleming territory here. Heck, we are not even in John le Carré territory here. So, if one is looking for action sequences, this is not your movie. Because the primary focus here is why these two men did what they did and the stress it put them under and how, in an environment where people are expected to use each other, they became friends. And both Mr. Cumberbatch and Mr. Ninidze played those two men extremely well.

Side note: I was unfamiliar with both the director and the screenwriter for this one. And was surprised to learn that the two previous movies that Mr. O'Connor wrote were Fire with Fire (2012) and The Hitman's Bodyguard (2017). The former a movie I never heard of with Bruce Willis and the latter an action/comedy with Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson. He definitely went down a different path with this one.

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Did anyone see ROLLER BOOGIE?

I did, because the power of Ben Mankiewicz compelled me!

(well, he did say they saved "the best for last")

What a time capsule.  Ugly-arse clothes, disco madness!  Curiously, while I find the soundtrack catchy and energetic, the direction, acting, script and dancing are pretty lame.

Poor Linda Blair.  The charisma and talent of a cantelope, but, sweet in her own little way. 

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2 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Did anyone see ROLLER BOOGIE?

I did, because the power of Ben Mankiewicz compelled me!

(well, he did say they saved "the best for last")

What a time capsule.  **** clothes, disco madness!  Curiously, while I find the soundtrack catchy and energetic, the direction, acting, script and dancing are pretty lame.

Poor Linda Blair.  The charisma and talent of a cantelope, but, sweet in her own little way. 

I used to watch ROLLER BOOGIE all the time on cable as a young one. 

Then I grew up. And I see what a dud it really is. Still, as you say, it's a great period of nostalgia for those who really boogied down in the 70's.

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I love Roller Boogie.  No, it's not a good movie by any means.  The leading actor is horrible.  But I still find it enjoyable to watch.  I love that the main conflict between Linda Blair and her parents is that she wants to give up her flautist scholarship at Juilliard to devote herself solely to roller disco.  Wasn't the contest only during the summer?  What does that have to do with starting her education at Juilliard in the fall? But who cares.  Plot isn't important in Roller Boogie.

Since I wasn't alive in the 1970s, there's no nostalgia.  I just find the camp and corn of this film to be very entertaining.  I love the roller disco films.  And I also love Linda Blair's kit car. 

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Last night I watched Promising Young Woman with Carrie Mulligan.  I would say it was interesting and thought provoking.  Brief synopsis.  Carey Mulligan's character is getting revenge for her friend who was raped in college.  The ending is rather ambiguous.  Mulligan's character is definitely unbalanced (and I got the idea that she had problems before her friend died (hinted she committed suicide).  Did anyone else see it?

Later on, re-watched Larry Crowne.  Cute (starring Tom Hanks, who also wrote it with Nia Vardalos).  He gets fired from his job at a large retail store because he didn't attend college (but he was a military veteran).  Julia Roberts is one of his teachers when he decides to go back.  It was cute.

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19 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I love Roller Boogie.  No, it's not a good movie by any means.  The leading actor is horrible.  But I still find it enjoyable to watch.  I love that the main conflict between Linda Blair and her parents is that she wants to give up her flautist scholarship at Juilliard to devote herself solely to roller disco.  Wasn't the contest only during the summer?  What does that have to do with starting her education at Juilliard in the fall? But who cares.  Plot isn't important in Roller Boogie.

Xanadu-Musehead that I am, watching repeated collections of B-movie trailers on YouTube has gotten me interested in Skatetown USA (1979), third in the roller-disco Trilogy, where the plot is more of a Saturday Night Fever-knockoff about rivalries (vs. a then-unknown Patrick Swayze) before the Big Dance Contest:

I'm hoping the library has a copy on DVD, but I'm not confident...Still, stranger things have happened.

I think my favorite part of Brainstorm is the scene in which one of the execs comes up with the idea of using the invention for VR sex, because in real life, you know that would be one of the big uses of the thing.

[Playstation VR helmet owner]  Friend, (puts arm around shoulder), let's have a little talk...   😉

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20 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I love Roller Boogie.  No, it's not a good movie by any means.  The leading actor is horrible.  But I still find it enjoyable to watch.  I love that the main conflict between Linda Blair and her parents is that she wants to give up her flautist scholarship at Juilliard to devote herself solely to roller disco.  Wasn't the contest only during the summer?  What does that have to do with starting her education at Juilliard in the fall? But who cares.  Plot isn't important in Roller Boogie.

Since I wasn't alive in the 1970s, there's no nostalgia.  I just find the camp and corn of this film to be very entertaining.  I love the roller disco films.  And I also love Linda Blair's kit car. 

Was there a plot?

The 1960's was my era but I spent some time in Southern California during the mid to late '70's so a lot of the scenery was nostalgic. 

Linda's car was something!

Although I'm a Boomer, I have no problem with TCM running these less-than-classic films from that era and a bit beyond; for myself, I'd choose 1989 as the cut-off year.  

 

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On 9/25/2021 at 7:30 PM, speedracer5 said:

I love Roller Boogie.  No, it's not a good movie by any means.  The leading actor is horrible.  But I still find it enjoyable to watch.  I love that the main conflict between Linda Blair and her parents is that she wants to give up her flautist scholarship at Juilliard to devote herself solely to roller disco.  Wasn't the contest only during the summer?  What does that have to do with starting her education at Juilliard in the fall? But who cares.  Plot isn't important in Roller Boogie.

Since I wasn't alive in the 1970s, there's no nostalgia.  I just find the camp and corn of this film to be very entertaining.  I love the roller disco films.  And I also love Linda Blair's kit car. 

I also like ROLLER BOOGIE. And it was TCM that introduced me to this movie.

One of my favorite parts is the opening sequence as the characters skate along the Venice Beach Boardwalk (with of some of the guys sporting what  I call "Jack Tripper shorts"), underscored by Cher's "Hell On Wheels,"  a song from her Casablanca Records period that was a track on her PRISONER album.  The version of "Hell On Wheels" featured in ROLLER BOOGIE is somewhat different  than the one on the album  ---  the verses are re-arranged and there's an extended instrumental portion.

The music video produced for "Hell On Wheels" was one of the first videos in the so-called "MTV style," created before there was an MTV.  At one point in the video, Cher arrives on roller skates at the scene of an accident where there are police officers,  hairy-faced men (some on motorcycles), drag queens and chickens (!!!) . . . 

Well, I’m hell on wheels.
I’m a roller mama.
I can slide down places  
That you never knew.
Try me on for size
At the rollerama.
If you tie my laces,
Then I’ll follow you.
Follow you!
Follow you!
Oh-oh-oh!

 

 

 

 

 

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I just finished NIGHT PASSAGE the Jesse Stone TV movie.  I know some of you probably think I'm obsessing over these movies and you're right. I cannot explain why they have caught my attention, but they have. Anyway, the film was great. It explains how Jesse got to Paradise from LA and introduces the other characters. I wish I had watched this one first. Now I'm on a quest to find the other six somewhere. My apologies to those who are not into these stories.

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On 9/25/2021 at 11:58 AM, LiamCasey said:

This [ The Courier (2020 ] is a fairly low-key espionage thriller. We are definitely not in Ian Fleming territory here. Heck, we are not even in John le Carré territory here. So, if one is looking for action sequences, this is not your movie. Because the primary focus here is why these two men did what they did and the stress it put them under and how, in an environment where people are expected to use each other, they became friends. And both Mr. Cumberbatch and Mr. Ninidze played those two men extremely well.

Espionage movies are better IMO without a lot of action. They are better when they are exactly how you describe them. To be a spy and finding themselves in the situations they must occupy is suspenseful enough not to require action. You imply that le Carre (how did you make that accent mark?) are action movies and maybe in the long run they are. There was a fair dearth of action in both The Spy Who Came in the Cold and the more recent A Most Wanted Man and much to my delight. I am not an experienced espionage movie watcher so I may only have a partial understanding of same. But your remarks about the The Courier makes me want to have a look. Thanks.

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@EricJ:  SKATETOWN, USA (1979) was not released on DVD.  It was finally released on homevideo after four decades in 2019 on BLU-RAY only.  It is a COLUMBIA PICTURES Blu-Ray release. 

(ROLLER BOOGIE (1979) was released on VHS by MGM and I bought a 'Used' tape of it a considerable number of years ago.   It's on DVD and probably Blu-Ray by now).

Here's another low-budget 1970s nugget that took almost 42 years to finally be released on homevideo.  No DVD, either.  BLU-RAY only.  It's RECORD CITY (1978) from SCORPION RELEASING/MGM.  Finally released in early 2020.  There's a Blu-Ray disc of "Record City" up for bids on eBay.  I bought myself a Blu-Ray disc of RECORD CITY a few months ago.  

@LAFFITTE:  You can get the accent mark over John le Carrè by holding down the 'ALT' key and '138' on your Numeric Keypad.  That gives the 'e' with the accent:  è.  Cheers.

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50 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

You can get the accent mark over John le Carrè by holding down the 'ALT' key and '138' on your Numeric Keypad.

Not if you're on Linux.  I picked the keyboard that allows me to do most of the European characters using the right-alt key, with the exception of the Polish L with a slash through it, I think.

And to be pedantic, it's "le Carré" with an accent aigu, not "le Carrè" with an accent grave.

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1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@LAFFITTE:  You can get the accent mark over John le Carrè by holding down the 'ALT' key and '138' on your Numeric Keypad.  That gives the 'e' with the accent:  è.  Cheers.

Is there a place where other such marvels can be found? A list of key strokes. Thanks.

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1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@EricJ:  SKATETOWN, USA (1979) was not released on DVD.  It was finally released on homevideo after four decades in 2019 on BLU-RAY only.  It is a COLUMBIA PICTURES Blu-Ray release. 

(ROLLER BOOGIE (1979) was released on VHS by MGM and I bought a 'Used' tape of it a considerable number of years ago.   It's on DVD and probably Blu-Ray by now).

Here's another low-budget 1970s nugget that took almost 42 years to finally be released on homevideo.  No DVD, either.  BLU-RAY only.  It's RECORD CITY (1978) from SCORPION RELEASING/MGM.  Finally released in early 2020.  There's a Blu-Ray disc of "Record City" up for bids on eBay.  I bought myself a Blu-Ray disc of RECORD CITY a few months ago.  

@LAFFITTE:  You can get the accent mark over John le Carrè by holding down the 'ALT' key and '138' on your Numeric Keypad.  That gives the 'e' with the accent:  è.  Cheers.

I have Skatetown USA.  I haven't watched it yet.  I have Roller Boogie on DVD.  To complete the roller disco trifecta, I also have Xanadu on DVD.  With Skatetown, USA, I was intrigued by the cast: Patrick Swayze, Maureen McCormick, Scott Baio, Flip Wilson, and Ruth Buzzi?! Count me in.

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

le Carre (how did you make that accent mark?)

On a Mac, an "acute accent" or accent-aigu (as in John le Carré or René Clair) is option-e + whichever letter needs the accent. (In other words, hold down the option key and the letter e; then release and type the relevant letter, which in French will be an e--in other languages, e.g. Spanish, it can occur over various vowels)

Accent-grave (as in Agnès Varda or là-bas) is option + ` (button to the left of numeral 1), then type whichever letter needs the accent

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