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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

...I take it you were joking about TCM's audio-default problems?   (Don't get the channel, so wouldn't know.)

I can't imagine people who weren't born in the 80's or didn't live through the Reagan presidency not being sick of Bedtime for Bonzo jokes either.

The YouTube version had Spanish subtitles.

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15 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

I would like to see this film especially since I'm a fan of the two leading ladies,  Lynn Bari and Cathy O'Donnell,  but I do wonder about the performance of Turhan Bey.

Based on what I have seen,  he is often the weakest actor in a film. 

This was the first I'd seen of Turhan Bey.  He seemed okay, but then, the role was not all that demanding. A lot of "relax and let your mind become receptive" type dialogue. I did notice he was less effective when complaining about the price increase of crystal balls to his partner-in-crime, for example. 😄

There's public domain prints on You Tube that actually look better than the one Amazon is selling.

PS - I hate to keep asking you, but please don't quote my screencaps until they fix this glitch. I've already lost half my allowed space.  Thanks so much. 

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No Time To Die.

(Possible(?) Spoilers to Follow so if Your gonna see it and have yet to; or absolutely cannot stand and detest my writing style in large part. Then Turn Away now.)

 

 

 

 

    It Blows at the end. Not even to give a carrot on a stick as to his (Implied) (Continued) Existence. I've Seen Cinema that Sticks Their Landing +Better at a Classier Sexier and Tighter Job of Acknowledgement, when said film Explicitly Shows a major Characters Passing. (Dreamland.. for example.)

  Otherwise.. Save for seemingly just going "MEHH!", With Another Lovely Feminine Cog in this Wheel and just.. i dunno. Writing Her Out and Not Giving Her the time of Day (Denis did it MUCH Better and Obviously knew what he was doing.); Aside for that respective Disrespect. its a FANTASTIC Affair. Craig (imo) with his performance here DEMOLISHES All Other Previous Bond's with his Multi-Faceted Nuanced Performance. Too Bad though by the end of the day the script csnt show him Decency (Nor that of Ms Ana), as to their (possible) (implied) Continued Existence.

 Give Hans Zimmer and Linus (Sandgren) Applause and HEAPS Of Kudos Though.

EXQUISITE.

  7/10

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The Upturned Glass, 1947  Directed by Lawrence Huntington  

Written by Pamela Mason and John Monaghan (some dude who mysteriously lived with the Masons for years as a gopher/bodyguard/writer?)                   Starring James Mason, Pamela Mason
1 hr. 22 min.  Crisp and clear print, in the public domain.

Above average British murder mystery with noir elements where a brilliant brain surgeon (Mason) is not above avenging the murder of his lover.  Is he sane or insane?  Excellent performance as always by Mason, who manages to elevate everything he appears in. The story is also very good and held my interest to the shocking end.   7.5/10

Full movie

 

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The other night, I watched My Best Friend's Wedding and Sleepless in Seattle.  Still can't figure out why An Affair to Remember is more "memorable" than the original (Love Affair).  

Last night, tried but fell asleep during the resurrected CSI Vegas.  Watched (and fell asleep during) Random Hearts.  Seen it before but didn't see any chemistry between the two leads (Harrison Ford and Kristin Scott Thomas).  Not one of Sydney Pollack's best.

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2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

The other night, I watched My Best Friend's Wedding and Sleepless in Seattle.  Still can't figure out why An Affair to Remember is more "memorable" than the original (Love Affair).  

 

I agree that the original LOVE AFFAIR is leagues ahead of AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER. 

Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, who are usually my favorites, do not have one tenth the chemistry that Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer had in the original.

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The Fugitive  Kind (1960). Marlon Brando, Anna Magnani,  Joanne Woodward.

Another helping of Tennessee's southern gothic cornpone served up medium hot.  A mysterious young stud comes to a small

southern town and gets various lonely ladies' nether regions in an uproar. This  time  the stud is played by Brando, posing as a geetar

playing musician with the typical Dixie name of Valentine Xavier. He is nicknamed Snakeskin because.......he wears a snakeskin  jacket.

His  geetar is his best friend.  Val is on the run from some hinted at trouble in New Orleans, not doubt of  an especially perverse  kind.

For a  while he  gets free spirit Woodward in a  tizzy,  but that goes nowhere,  maybe because Woodward looks  like she  put  on her

eye  makeup in the dark. But the middle aged and married  Magnani falls for Val. She  is tied down to her dying husband who runs a

general store  and has a very bad temper. Val  is hired to help out in the store. He doesn't exactly  break his back from  hard  work.

Hubby cottons to the fact that Marlon  and  Magnani  are getting it on, southern small  town style and that she is  now preggers.

The sheriff has been on Val's case since he drifted into town  and now  warns him to get  out before sunrise. Val doesn't, leading

to tragic consequences. Hubby sets Anna's new addition to the store on fire  and  Val is killed in the ruckus that follows.  Meandering

film  with  more eccentrics then  you'd likely find in five southern towns. Brando does his  mumbling confused guy shtick fairly

well and the film  does have its moments  of unintended comedy, but it's hard to take seriously as a whole. Williams spends so much

time on the kinks of the various characters that it's  hard to believe in them very much. It's more like a weird human zoo  than anything

else. Just keep the cages  locked.

 

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On TCM recently, I saw "The 7th Victim", which I've seen several times before and enjoy watching.  It struck me as strange that the ending passed muster with the Production Code, because it was such a bummer.   It ends with a suicide (which is not shown, of course) of a person who got wrapped up with some well-heeled devil worshipers.  The only reason I can think such an ending would have been allowed  was perhaps to serve as a cautionary tale about what happens when you dabble in the occult?  Does anyone have any insight on why such an ending would have been permitted?

I also caught a couple of Italian flicks as part of TCM's "New Wave Cinema" for October.  I had never seen either of them, but I thought they were pretty good.  "Rome:  Open City" and "Mamma Roma", both of which had Anna Magnani in the cast.   She would be a good candidate for a Summer Under The Stars honoree.  She can be subtle and even a bit demure, and like a light switch, she can turn it on and become quite demonstrative to the point where you'd think she was way over the top with her acting. 

In the first movie, Magnani plays a widowed single mother who is engaged to her neighbor who is part of the Italian resistance against the Germans who have occupied Rome after Mussolini was ousted from power.  She also happens to be pregnant with his child.  The parish priest, who is also part of the underground movement, isn't thrilled about Magnani's condition since she's not married, or the fact that her fiancee is an atheist, but he puts his ecclesiastical theology aside to focus on ridding the city of the occupying forces.  Francesco, Magnani's betrothed, is helping an engineer named Giorgio escape from the Nazis who are on his tail.  I won't go any further with the plot, but I will say the scenes in this picture, especially over the last 20 minutes, were pretty graphic (for its time).

The second film had Magnani playing a single mother again who is a vendor of figs in her neighborhood's produce market.  That's her day job.  At night, she's a prostitute who is, shall we say, more 'experienced' than the young fillies she runs with on the streets.  She's trying to earn enough money to help her son stay away from the kind of sordid and wayward life she had in her youth.  She was being extorted with exposure of her past life to her 16-year old son, Ettore, which is why she caved in to the demands made by her former lover, turned pimp, Carmine.  But despite her efforts, Ettore seems bent on being the 'big shot' with his neighborhood pals.  Will he end up being a known quantity to the cops?  Will she be able to break free from Carmine's threats and demands and lead the kind of life she wants? 

Both pictures were pretty compelling cinema.  I give "Rome:  Open City" 8 out of 10 on the rating scale, and "Mamma Rosa" 7 out of 10.

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Rome: Open City is so good. I'd seen it once before and watched it this week again. The actor/actress playing the Nazis were so loathsome. (looking and acting). Def. Lesbian vibes from the drug peddling Nazi witch........

 

SPOILER: 

I was surprised, first viewing, that Magnani exited the film so early. Wasn't expecting that.

 

I've seen Mama Roma too, but I don't remember a lot about it except it being a bit too long. I liked it though.

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48 minutes ago, midwestan said:

On TCM recently, I saw "The 7th Victim", which I've seen several times before and enjoy watching.  It struck me as strange that the ending passed muster with the Production Code, because it was such a bummer.   It ends with a suicide (which is not shown, of course) of a person who got wrapped up with some well-heeled devil worshipers.  The only reason I can think such an ending would have been allowed  was perhaps to serve as a cautionary tale about what happens when you dabble in the occult?  Does anyone have any insight on why such an ending would have been permitted?

Maybe they allowed it as a cautionary tale to show what can happen to  young women who live in Greenwich Village.

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If I remember rightly THE SEVENTH VICTIM originally ran 82 minutes and was cut down to "B"-movie feature length at 71 minutes.  I've seen it four times; I found it interestingly eerie so I watched it a few times.  :)  

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I requested two of Jane Powell's movies from the library after her death, in both she was the star of the films: HIT THE DECK '55 and SMALL TOWN GIRL '53.  Jane was definitely star material she was beautiful and had a gorgeous effortless singing voice. She wasn't a bad dancer either.

I couldn't get through Hit The Deck, I just wasn't interested. I didn't care for the convoluted story or the male leads- Tony Martin, Walter Pidgeon, Vic Damone or Gene Raymond. Only Russ Tamblyn was cute & worth watching. Tamblyn was pared with Debbie Reynolds who was great as usual, but took a back seat to Powell. I really like Jane & Debbie together, they are so similar in size & effervescence. 

This was pretty typical fluff punctuated by astounding song & dance numbers with Ann Miller. I believe  Ann Miller had a clause in her contract that said she should always dance alone, the only others allowed were "back ground" dancers.

The poster shows the gals as a blonde, brunette & redhead and reminiscent of On The Town.

Hit_the_Deck_poster.jpg

Last night I finished SMALL TOWN GIRL. Again, with sparky Ann Miller and another lump of leading man Farley Granger. Someone else had mentioned being confounded he ever became a star. Agree. MGM's Pasternak crafted these movies which are top notch productions, but you can't just insert eye candy male leads, they need substance & likability. That one element makes the entire movie a failure, no matter HOW talented the gals are they can't carry a thin story by themselves.

And what a thin story: rich spoiled NYC boy speeds through a small town & is incarcerated for 30 days. In that time his opinion shifts from disparaging small town life, to accepting & loving it, helped by Jane Powell. This story line was recycled to a 22 minute Andy Griffith Show episode, that's how thin it is! But this movie relies a little more on charactors and it was great to see Billie Burke as Granger's Mom, Robert Keith & Fay Wray as Powell's parents providing solid support. Nat King Cole sang a song and Bobby Van did his famous "hopping" dance routine. Note Ann Miller is huge on the poster, her dance numbers were staged by Busby Berkeley and it shows-wow!

Small_town_girl_poster.jpg

Jane Powell was a beautiful ingenue and in some scenes reminded me of Marilyn Monroe. These are great fluff pieces which MGM was always known for,  late in the studio's timeline- just about the last of them. 

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I just watched All About Eve, with Ben Mankiewitz hosting the discussion.  I love George Sanders' Oscar winning performance.  However, I cannot believe how the hosts, such as Ben M., constantly ignore Sanders' major contributions to the success of each of his pictures.  Ben only mentions Sanders at the very end, with a cavalier comment "...and also with George Sanders...".  Sanders was the only actor in the picture to earn an Oscar, how about discussing his performance?  This kind of disrespect constantly happens with Sanders' pictures.

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I agree.  He was certainly the most outstanding of the male actors.  While there was nothing particularly wrong with them, Lloyd and Bill were portrayed as rather bland, but serviceable. 

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I am a little disappointed that Ben didn't give George Sanders a bit more of his due because as Maura pointed out, he did earn the Best Supporting Actor Award that year.

I always loved (SPOILER) Addison's dressing down of Eve near the end. Surely, the 'alliance' of these two heels should have warranted some discussion.

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1 hour ago, Roy Cronin said:

I love to use "You're too short for that gesture " whenever the opportunity arises.

I love that line too. I wish I could use it on someone, but at only 5’2” I would probably only be able to use it on children! :’(

I also love it when he calls her out on there being no Schubert Theatre in San Francisco. Then tells her it was a stupid lie, unworthy of her. 

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El Paso 1949 Paramount   Directed by Lester R.  Foster. John Payne Sterling Hayden Gail Russell Henry Hull. Set in 1865 Payne is an ex Confederate soldier leaving Charleston to establish his law practice in El Paso,going there to hopefully rejoin his former flame .The city is almost lawless with a highly corrupted judge,sheriff etc.Hayden is the heavy and Russell is wasted (!).Exteriors filmed in New Mexico,very nice cinematography. Presented in Cinecolor.103 minutes 7/10

 

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  Daisy Miller 1974  Paramount.Directed by  Peter Bogdanovitch.Cybil Shepherd Barry Brown Eileen Brennan Cloris Leachman. Bogdanovitch was a little bit ahead of his time for a victorian era film set in Italy with Shepherd as an ingenue causing  negative gossip in a very prude society. Shepherd has a very fast delivery and it is annoying. Merchant Ivory had just started victorian era films but mainly 5 years later and they did them much better.They would have not cast Cybil in the leading role but she was involved with Bogdanovitch for 3 years so it was a vanity project. Story by Henry James, Merchant Ivory would do several of his stories in the early 80's.Brennan is excellent.Shot in Italy nice cinematography. 91 minutes 6.75/10 

 

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A Bell for Adano 1945 20th Century Fox. Directed by Henry King .John Hodiak Gene Tierney William Bendix Richard Conte. Made in California,filmed just before the war was over,there is no battles in this film,it is the administrative duties of the American Army in a small Italian village ravaged by the war.Hodiak is the star of this film, despite Tierney's top billing as a blonde Italian girl with hardly any accent at all, a total miscasted role and not that important in the film..Conte has a small role delivering his lines.Hodiak's favorite film. 103 minutes.7/10 because of Hodiak.

 

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 Ride Beyond Vengeance 1966 Columbia .Directed by Bernard McEveety.Chuck Connors Gloria Grahame Michael Rennie Kathryn Hayes Joan Blondell  Gary Merrill Claude Akins , many others first screen credit for Bill Bixby. Underrated western, Connors is very good as the lead. Filmed in 1965 in 5 different states.This is the only film done in the 60' by Gloria Grahame,beautiful at 43,not a big part but a fair one.The bar- room fight between Akins & Connors is quite amazing ,one of the best ever filmed. I pity the saloon owners. Who pays for the repairs ? Released in early 1966,produced by Mark Goodson &Bill Todman (Price is Right producers)-they produced a few films. 96 minutes 7.5 /10

 

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  Mustang Country 1976 Universal.Directed by John C.  Champion.Joel McCrea Nika Mina.Set in 1925 at the Montana -Canadian border.A former rancher & rodeo star is trying to capture an elusive, extremely hard to get mustang stallion.Great cinematography,filmed entirely in Banff Alberta in Canada, full of wild life and great scenery. McCrea was retired for several years but the screenplay enticed him to do it and to make it is definitive last film. A great ending to a remarquable career of a very generous actor. 80  minutes 8/10

 

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I just watched "Journey to the Center of the Earth" (1959).  I love it, love it, love it!  I especially like the scenes where they finally reached the center and it's all these beautiful rocks and gemstones.  I went out and bought a ton, (waaaaayyyyy too much), rocks and minerals and I decorated my tv console with them.  They make me so happy.  🙂 

Plus a young Pat Boone wasn't too hard on the eyes 😉

image.jpeg.094763857124bae8ff181b635bbc4308.jpeg

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Casanova's Big Night  1954 Paramount. Directed by  Norman Z. McLeod. Bob Hope Joan Fontaine Basil Rathbone Lon Chaney jr Raymond Burr, (Burr was ubiquitous in the 50's ) and Vincent Price is unbilled but appears for several minutes at the beginning of the film as Casanova.I am not a fan of Bob Hope I watched some of his films for a particular actor or actress in it,otherwise I pass.In this one he does his usual stuff as the ultimate coward with a string of one liners,a little better than usual.Fontaine looks terrific at 37,it dawns on me,she has a very similar voice like her sister Olivia De Havilland.Nice technicolor .Good effort.86 minutes .7/10

 

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