Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I' ll Never Forget You 1951 20th Century Fox aka  House in the Square. Directed by Roy Ward Baker.Tyrone Power Ann Blyth Michael Rennie.I was happy to watch this one,it is a remake of Berkeley Square.The opening credits were in black & white and then my jaw dropped as I was reading 'Technicolor consultant so  & so' and everything was in b&w. Finally  the Technicolor arrived when Power was in the past .Sorry for a little spoiler.I enjoyed the film as I had never seen it before this week.Nice sentimental film. 90 minutes 7/10

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday (roughly noon) watched one of my favorite films:  Two for the Road.  The music, the realistic depiction of the ups and downs of a marriage, funny and bittersweet.  And Audrey looking so beautiful no matter what she was wearing (and she and Finney had great chemistry).  Plus roads and cars (it is a theme that runs throughout).

The film makes me cry - cathartic, which, especially due to pandemic and other reasons, made it a great movie for me to stumble upon.

William Daniels is funny in a supporting role.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I_Met_a_Murderer.jpg

 

I Met a Murderer, 1939   62 min.   Directed by Roy Kellino                                                                                                                                                             Written by James Mason, Roy Kellino, Pamela Kellino (later Mason)              Starring James Mason and Pamela Kellino 

B movie done cheaply on their own dime.  The small number of cast members are mostly  unpaid actor friends.  The print is  grainy, with inappropriate, intrusive music.  The story was promising but the execution is amateurish and the tone uneven, starting off with a murder then becoming sort of a romantic comedy, then something else.

James is gorgeous here but miscast as Farmer John.  His shrewish wife is no help with the harvesting and even shoots his dog out of plain meanness.  As James is digging the dog's grave he decides to enlarge the hole by a few feet, which we totally understand. When other animals start digging around he goes on the run and meets up with Pamela who's kind of a wandering writer with a travel trailer. Pretty darn convenient, but the working title of her latest book has him a little worried.    4/10

 

As is often the case, the behind-the-scenes stuff is more interesting than the film. According to Sheridan Morley in Odd Man Out: James Mason, a Biography, they were still learning their craft, had a miniscule budget, and it was a labor of love, in a manner of speaking. The talented trio lived together until Pamela and James became a couple, which a blind man should've seen coming.   Shortly after the film wrapped Roy sued for divorce naming James but later moved into their guest house, so apparently they all hugged it out. 

Full movie, for hardcore Mason fans only

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday watched two Sandra Bullock Films - Sequel to Miss Congeniality (innocuous) and then Practical Magic (based on Alice Hoffman books).  It is cute.

This a.m., watched Hillary Clinton and Louise Penny discussing their new book plus Billy Porter on CBS Sunday Morning.  I just received new Louise Penny book (separate from one with Hillary Clinton).  Watched (all except final season) Pose and like Billy Porter.  Did not know that he was HIV positive in real life.  There are so many great stories on that show.

One thing that really angered me was a clip on the Sunday version of the Today Show:  It showed Kim Kardashian (no comment) making a horrible joke about her ex Kanye West.  He has mental health issues as many people do (myself included).  SNL is not the show it once was - much more mean spirited and unfunny (also anti-Semitic).

Tonight, ME TV runs Dick Van Dyke show.  Didn't know (found out reading last week's Parade Magazine) that Morey Amsterdam was responsible for theme song.

Always like reading these undiscovered film gems (for me) that other people are watching.

Excuse typos.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

 The Great Gatsby  1949 Paramount. Directed by Elliott Nugent.Alan Ladd Betty Field Macdonald Carey Ruth Hussey Barry Sullivan Howard Da Silva Shelley Winters. This is the only film version made under the code. So a lot from the book was removed or seriously toned down. Despite that, it is still very enjoyable,it has great sets,costumes by Edith Head. Very good acting from all the actors.91 minutes 7.25/10

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pony Express 1953 Paramount . Directed by Jerry Hopper.Charlton Heston Rhonda Fleming Jan Sterling Forrest Tucker. Good western about the origins of the Pony Express with Buffalo Bill and Wild Bill Hickok.Nice cinematography in Utah & Arizona. Historical nonsense but as I said a good western. 101 minutes .7/10

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Passion 1954 RKO.Directed by Allan Dwan. Cornel Wilde Yvonne De Carlo Raymond Burr Lon Chaney jr, Stuart Whitman appears unbilled. Good western ,well a good average one.. with a sort of family feud a la The Big Country . De Carlo plays identicals twins both in love with Cornel ,this problem gets resolved during  the film, Great Technicolor, a movie done or finished at the very end of the Howard Hughes tenure at RKO. Surprisingly this film never played on TCM. 84 minutes 6.5/10 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 Spawn of the North 1938 Paramount. Directed by Henry Hathaway. George Raft Henry Fonda Dorothy Lamour John Barrymore Akim Tamiroff. Good action film set in Alaska,a war between fishermen and poaching,it turns deadly.Hathaway filmed 14 weeks in Alaska for real footage,the actors were not there.Special Oscar for special effects to the whole crew,Iam not sure if the category existed then but it is  a very good tribute to the crew there.Hathaway did a great directing job with Raft & Lamour.Tamiroff is the best of the lot .In one scene  sitting at a table near Barrymore,Fonda is smiling,I'am sure this was not in the script.Barrymore looks inebriated the whole movie ! 110 minutes. 7.25/10

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, nakano said:

Passion 1954 RKO.Directed by Allan Dwan. Cornel Wilde Yvonne De Carlo Raymond Burr Lon Chaney jr, Stuart Whitman appears unbilled. Good western ,well a good average one.. with a sort of family feud a la The Big Country . De Carlo plays identicals twins both in love with Cornel ,this problem gets resolved during  the film, Great Technicolor, a movie done or finished at the very end of the Howard Hughes tenure at RKO. Surprisingly this film never played on TCM. 84 minutes 6.5/10 

passion.jpg

That is surprising that "Passion" has never been shown on TCM.

As for the other films you've reviewed recently, it will probably be 'never' when we get to see "Pony Express" since it's a Paramount film.  Same goes for "Spawn of the North".  Not so surprisingly, the 1949 version of "The Great Gatsby" (another Paramount film) has never been shown on TCM.  Interestingly though, the other two renditions of "The Great Gatsby", from 1926 and 1974 have only been shown a whopping 3 times on TCM!  The silent version aired just once in November, 2004.  The version most people are familiar with (Redford & Farrow) last aired in January, 2015 (the first time was in November, 2012).

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, midwestan said:

That is surprising that "Passion" has never been shown on TCM.

As for the other films you've reviewed recently, it will probably be 'never' when we get to see "Pony Express" since it's a Paramount film.  Same goes for "Spawn of the North".  Not so surprisingly, the 1949 version of "The Great Gatsby" (another Paramount film) has never been shown on TCM.  Interestingly though, the other two renditions of "The Great Gatsby", from 1926 and 1974 have only been shown a whopping 3 times on TCM!  The silent version aired just once in November, 2004.  The version most people are familiar with (Redford & Farrow) last aired in January, 2015 (the first time was in November, 2012).

I,am doing these mini  reviews for my personnal pleasure and I watched  them all  in the days I posted them.I hope, maybe foolishly , that TCM 's programmers might look at what we watch or want, No purpose for me here to give my small opinion on NBNW. About Gatsby there was a tv movie done in 2000 with Mira Sorvino  but I have not seen it.. Now read this: Shortly before releasing The Great Gatsby (1974) in cinemas, Paramount Pictures suppressed the distribution of nitrate prints for The Great Gatsby (1926) and The Great Gatsby (1949) in order to deter theaters from playing those earlier versions instead of their upcoming 1974 version. This decision led to prints for both films being lost. Decades later, in 2012, a print of the 1949 version was rediscovered. The 1926 version, however, is still lost.From IMDB. ADDED Then the 1926 version was found also since it played here in 2004.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, nakano said:

 The Great Gatsby  1949 Paramount. Directed by Elliott Nugent.Alan Ladd Betty Field Macdonald Carey Ruth Hussey Barry Sullivan Howard Da Silva Shelley Winters. This is the only film version made under the code. So a lot from the book was removed or seriously toned down. Despite that, it is still very enjoyable,it has great sets,costumes by Edith Head. Very good acting from all the actors.91 minutes 7.25/10

gatsby.jpg

And they still make Ladd look like the quintessential Noire antihero on the poster😂

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Citizen Ed said:

And they still make Ladd look like the quintessential Noire antihero on the poster😂

Yes but I think the Gatsby's background is very Noir with Daisy the Femme Fatale in a way.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Charade_(1953_film).jpg

Charade, 1953. (not the Cary Grant version)  1 hr. 22 min.   Directed by Roy Kellino 
 Written by Pamela Mason, James Mason                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Starring James Mason, Pamela Mason

The BFFs are back, and a long way from I Met a Murderer in 1939.  With a trio of stories that differ in tone in one movie, James and Pamela introduce and star in each segment as different characters. It opens with them at home (supposedly) acting naturally and talking about how each story came about. 

"Portrait of a Murderer" has James in the title role, a killer who moves into a vacant apartment next to an artist, Pamela. The apartment is conveniently vacant because he killed the occupant, which Pamela seems aware of. She's too turned on to turn him in, and predictably gets strangled herself, which is beginning to feel like fan service.

In "Duel at Dawn" James plays an 18th century military officer who is provoked into challenging someone to a duel. In those days the only recourse for an insult was exchange of gunfire. Actually not much has changed, but there were ground rules and serious consequences if not followed. I'm not sure how much more serious it would be than getting shot, but it had to be pretty darn serious. 

The third "The Midas Touch" has James as an unlikely window washer and valet, with Pamela as a ladies maid who dreams of making it big in America, but James has been there, done that.  He's no Cary Grant but isn't bad, although I don't think screwball comedy is his forte.  Pamela is ..Pamela  I actually like her and think she was a talented writer. An actress, not so much.


Back in 1974 Mason said about this film, "I had hoped that this curiosity would be lost without a trace."  On the contrary, it's now on the internet and will be around for a very long time, I'm afraid.  I've seen a lot worse.   6/10

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

CIGARJOE  had mentioned "Johnny Midnight",   a jazzy, noir-influenced private eye series with the fabulous Edmond O'Brien.  I could find only one episode on youtube ,  which I just watched.  He's an ex-actor,  owns a theater, lives in a New York penthouse, and is now a detective adept at disguises b/c of his theater background.

I don't care how implausible it is, love that there's another way to watch Edmond O'Brien.  He's charismatic in this, as he is in everything.

Almost everything "suspense"-related with "Johnny" or "Johnnie" in the title is good....

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Citizen Ed said:

And they still make Ladd look like the quintessential Noire antihero on the poster😂

The 1949 Gatsby makes it clear that Gatsby was a bootlegger who learned from long-time criminal Henry Hull. TCM showed this at one of the festivals, and I'm surprised it hasn't been on TV. Macdonald Carey is a bit dull as Nick Carraway, and Betty Field is miscast as Daisy (too neurotic, not beautiful enough, though interesting), but everyone else is really good. The directing isn't brilliant, but it is competent and enjoyable.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, King Rat said:

The 1949 Gatsby makes it clear that Gatsby was a bootlegger who learned from long-time criminal Henry Hull. TCM showed this at one of the festivals, and I'm surprised it hasn't been on TV. Macdonald Carey is a bit dull as Nick Carraway, and Betty Field is miscast as Daisy (too neurotic, not beautiful enough, though interesting), but everyone else is really good. The directing isn't brilliant, but it is competent and enjoyable.

You are right in the opening minute of the film we see Gatsby shooting-killing cops.Something not in the 1974 version.I did not like Betty Field she acted like a teenager.Nugent  directed the film at the last minute substituting for somebody else  I do not remember who right now.Carey is always a reliable actor always dull...

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, nakano said:

 The Great Gatsby  1949 Paramount. Directed by Elliott Nugent.Alan Ladd Betty Field Macdonald Carey Ruth Hussey Barry Sullivan Howard Da Silva Shelley Winters. This is the only film version made under the code. So a lot from the book was removed or seriously toned down. Despite that, it is still very enjoyable,it has great sets,costumes by Edith Head. Very good acting from all the actors.91 minutes 7.25/10

gatsby.jpg

Have to admit that i didn't even know about this earlier version of the film- and Fitzgerald is my second favorite author.  With a recent release of 'lost' short stories two years ago, i've read everything he's written that i know of, and funny enough Gatsby is one of my least favorite of his works.  

I wonder if Gatsby was so great yet by 1949 as Fitzgerald's legend grew after his death and he died at the tail end of 1940.  I'll have to find this version now.

For anyone who likes both films  and Fitzgerald I'd recommend the Pat Hobby stories- but i'm sure most people on here already know about them.

And for the record, my favorite Fitzgerald movie adaptation is The Last Time I Saw Paris (1954) with Van Johnson and Elizabeth Taylor and based on the short story Babylon Revisited.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Missed Noir Alley on Saturday but i recently bought a 10 film Noir film collection on Amazon for under $10 and watched three of them last week.  Not sure any of them are actually noir so far.

Whirlpool (1950) A woman is hypnotized to commit a murder- but did she really commit it? Found this film a bit silly.

Shock (1946) A woman goes into shock after witnessing a murder and ends up being cared for by a doctor, played by Vincent Price, who was actually the murderer the woman witnessed. 

They Made Me A Criminal (1939) A champion boxer is wrongly accused of murder and is on the run and presumed dead but with a detective still searching for him.  He takes up boxing again to help raise money for a children's school/farm.  No resolution to the murder wrap and so many other dead ends in the story that i wonder why they were ever introduced in the film to begin with.

Link to post
Share on other sites

More from the week:

The Body Snatcher( 1945) Pretty good and enjoy seeing Karloff and  Lugosi together without monster makeup.

Doctor X (1932) Had to laugh a few times when Doctor X proclaims the serial killer that the police are looking for is a cannibal and then he introduces his colleagues to the police and one has been studying cannibalism and two others were recently stranded on a boat at sea where the third person didn't return.  I like the journalist character who is constantly up to gags such as the buzzer on his hand.  ended up liking this after i thought i wouldn't 20 minnutes in.

The Mummy (1959) Hammer Film production.  Like most of the mummy films, found it fairly boring.

Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972) Another Hammy film (typo stays as it is fitting).   Think they should've made this film in the swinging 60's of London instead of the early 70's.  Music was too cheesy but they go with the music from the time period instead of horror genre.  Parts of this film are okay but ultimately too cheesy.  And they added the detail that vampires can be killed by a stream of pure water???  Seeing a vampire killed in the shower just doesn't feel fitting.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@LILYPOND:  If you'd like to see a sinister side to Edmond O'Brien I think you'd like the 1966 TVM written by Rod Serling (who later regretted writing it): 

DOOMSDAY FLIGHT, The

Edmond wears Coke-bottle thick glasses and is properly menacing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/8/2021 at 10:24 PM, nakano said:

 Ride Beyond Vengeance 1966 Columbia .Directed by Bernard McEveety.Chuck Connors Gloria Grahame Michael Rennie Kathryn Hayes Joan Blondell  Gary Merrill Claude Akins , many others first screen credit for Bill Bixby. Underrated western, Connors is very good as the lead. Filmed in 1965 in 5 different states.This is the only film done in the 60' by Gloria Grahame,beautiful at 43,not a big part but a fair one.The bar- room fight between Akins & Connors is quite amazing ,one of the best ever filmed. I pity the saloon owners. Who pays for the repairs ? Released in early 1966,produced by Mark Goodson &Bill Todman (Price is Right producers)-they produced a few films. 96 minutes 7.5 /10

ride.jpg

I was amazed they didn't get injured shooting that fight.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

More from the week:

The Body Snatcher( 1945) Pretty good and enjoy seeing Karloff and  Lugosi together without monster makeup.

Doctor X (1932) Had to laugh a few times when Doctor X proclaims the serial killer that the police are looking for is a cannibal and then he introduces his colleagues to the police and one has been studying cannibalism and two others were recently stranded on a boat at sea where the third person didn't return.  I like the journalist character who is constantly up to gags such as the buzzer on his hand.  ended up liking this after i thought i wouldn't 20 minnutes in.

The Mummy (1959) Hammer Film production.  Like most of the mummy films, found it fairly boring.

Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972) Another Hammy film (typo stays as it is fitting).   Think they should've made this film in the swinging 60's of London instead of the early 70's.  Music was too cheesy but they go with the music from the time period instead of horror genre.  Parts of this film are okay but ultimately too cheesy.  And they added the detail that vampires can be killed by a stream of pure water???  Seeing a vampire killed in the shower just doesn't feel fitting.

I like Hammer's retooling of THE MUMMY (1959). I always enjoy the teaming of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee.

DRACULA A.D. 1972 is kind of a letdown, especially when compared to HORROR OF DRACULA and THE BRIDES OF DRACULA. Even DRACULA: PRINCE OF DARKNESS is more enjoyable for me personally.

I absolutely love THE BODY SNATCHER, in my view, Karloff's best performance aside from the Monster in the FRANKENSTEIN films. If you really want to see Karloff and Lugosi go toe to toe, I recommend 1934's THE BLACK CAT or 1935's THE RAVEN where they have more screen time together.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...