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5 minutes ago, jameselliot said:

I'm a Tubi fan. They show some really wacky 'underground' movies, compared to TCM's pathetic Underground programming. I liked that "gas station" analogy. They also have rare, high brow movies such as Corridor of Mirrors.

They also have FACES OF DEATH on TUBI!!!! 
(Or at least they did a few weeks ago.)

And you don’t get too much more hard-core underground than that...

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I’m trying hard to make it through RIVERS EDGE (1986), but to be honest with you, I really don’t think it’s very good.

am I alone in this? 
or am I missing something?

(it was on TCM UNDERGROUND)

edit: I only have 12 minutes left of it, but to be honest with you, I don’t even care about sticking around that long.

 

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

I'm one of those people who goes ballistic when the CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS take over the LOWE'S GARDEN CENTER in October,

To be fair, you go ballistic over a lot of things.  :P

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Night of Terror 1933 Foy Produc.dist by Columbia.Directed by Benjamin Stoloff. Bela Lugosi Wallace Ford.Mystery movie in a haunted house,Lugosi is wasted as an Indian servant. Not very good. 65 minutes 5.75/10

NIGHT.jpg

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Bengal Brigade  1954 Universal  . Directed by Laslo Benedek. Rock Hudson  Arlene Dahl Ursula Thiess Thorin Thatcher. In beautiful Technicolor,a revolt in India against the British government.Hudson is a British soldier with no accent.Dahl is the woman he loves,Thiess is the one who wants him.Not a great movie at all just ok at the most.Ursula Thiess just married Robert Taylor then she would do two more films & raise a family. She is more than gorgeous,apparently Arlene Dahl was upset when she discovered what she looked like.She said 'I would have never signed the contract  if I knew about her in advance.' 87 minutes.A generous 6/10

Bengal_Bridgade.jpeg

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10 hours ago, AndreaDoria said:

I've just discovered Tubi, too.  I actually found more movies I'm interested in  there than on my free Netflix month . . .

Netflix bites The Big One, as far as I'm concerned. I'd dump it in a New York Minute except that my "domestic partner" is hooked on Grace and Frankie.  However, now that the show has ended, my Netflix subscription is definitely on the chopping block. Very little of what is on Netflix interests and appeals to me.

Regarding Tubi, I dig it. I just wish that it was commercial-free. This past week I watched two British thrillers on Tubi.

The Anatomist is a very talky and dreadfully bloodless British "teleplay" (produced by the notorious Harry Alan Towers) that concerns Burke and Hare and their employer, the titular protagonist Dr. Knox. Not at all thrilling and not much in it to recommend, other than the casting of Michael Ripper. It was a pleasure and a revelation to behold him being given more screen time than he was ever allowed in a Hammer Film* and watch him really ripping into the character of grave robber Hare. Also noteworthy is the always captivating Adrienne Corri who turned in a typically consummate performance. Ditto Alastair Sim (Dr. Knox) who, similar to Corri, immeasurably enhanced the films he was in with his commanding presence.

Shadow Man (née Street of Shadows) is, IMO, a much better mystery-thriller, some might call it Film Noir. Similar to The Anatomist, it offers British film fans the opportunity to see a "minor" character actor granted the opportunity to shine in a beefier dramatic role than he was usually given. In this case, the actor is pinch-faced Victor Maddern, here evoking Lon Chaney as deformed Danny "Limpy" Thomas**, a gofer for boxer-turned-club owner Luigi (Cesar Romero). Among the supporting players are two actresses who would tragically die a few years after appearing in Shadow Man: Kay Kendall and Simone Silva.

* Production manager on The Anatomist was Aida Young, who later would produce some of Hammer's superior chillers during its twilight years.

** A role that, for horror film fans, could be seen as a warm-up to Maddern's monstrous hunchback in Blood of the Vampire.

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And Now Tomorrow 1944  Paramount . Alan Ladd Loretta Young Susan Hayward Barry Sullivan. Directed by Irving Pichel,screenplay by Raymond Chandler (!).Melodrama of deaf woman and her problems with a current relationship until Dr Ladd comes in.You would never guess it could be  a Chandler screenplay,full of clichés and no special dialogue.More a Young type of movie than a Ladd one.Hayward is very good. 86 minutes 6.25/10 

LADD.jpg

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 Cattle Empire  1958 20th Century Fox.  Directed by Charles Marquis Warren. Joel McCrea Gloria Talbott. Another good western with Joel McCrea,he is a former convict coming back to see the people who put him in jail,he finally rides the cattle  trail for a former foe,95% of the film is happening outdoors.Beautiful scenery filmed in Arizona in Cinemascope,the effect then must have been terrific.Any western with McCrea is good,he is a fine actor and in the mid40's he switched to do  only westerns. 83 minutes 6.75/10 

CATTLE.jpg

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The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini 1966 AIP aka American International.  Directed by Don Weis.Tommy Kirk .Basil Rathbone. Guest star is Boris Karloff. Supporting roles for Nancy Sinatra Patsy Kelly  and a small role for Francis X Bushman ,his last role in a film, he died 4 months after the release in 1966.The last of the Beach Party movies,(filmed in october 1965) different and a dreadful one.There is no beach at the haunted house but there is a pool so why not ? Music by The Bobby Fuller Four  on screen. Times were hard for Basil for him to do this,he did a few more bad ones and died a year later 1967.Stanley Cortez was handling the camera.  Like I have read  somewhere for masochistic film buffs (I'am one I think ) .82 minutes 3.50/10

ghost.jpg

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2 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Netflix bites The Big One, as far as I'm concerned. I'd dump it in a New York Minute except that my "domestic partner" is hooked on Grace and Frankie.  However, now that the show has ended, my Netflix subscription is definitely on the chopping block. Very little of what is on Netflix interests and appeals to me.

I felt the same way once. However lately I have enjoyed, When Heros Fly*, Fauda, Bodyguard*, Rebellion*, Peaky Blinders, The Paper, The Queen's Gambit*, Black Money Love (very irritating at times but a lot of good, can't believe I hung on, probably the longest miniseries ever), Borgen, Clickbait, The Sinner, Deadwind, and Broadchurch. The asterisk signifies especially good. I have seen a number so-called original netflix movies but here I am listing just the miniseries.

I have also Amazon Prime, Britbox, HBO max (free to me) and none of these seem to have the appeal in sheer numbers that Netflix has (I should exclude BritBox from any negativity because I am a Brit Junkie, especially Masterpiece Theater type stuff. They have all the those brilliant Shakespeare BBC productions that were produced in the 70s and 80s, and select BBC miniseries over the years.

Netflix for only $8 a month seems quite a deal. Especially since I am now into slumming. Those shows above are not normally my cuppa but I am being won over. Some of the European shows are quite good. To be sure, I have suspended viewing on a number due to lack of interest. The biggest disappointment is Babylon Berlin, a exceedingly promising show with amazing local color. For some reason, I couldn't stand the lead actress, annoying as heck and I am not even sure why. But the biggest problem (for me) was the management of the story. Just to cryptic to me. I tried to hang in there but finally had to give up because I became damn tired of trying to figure out what the crap was going on. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

I felt the same way once. However lately I have enjoyed, When Heros Fly*, Fauda, Bodyguard*, Rebellion*, Peaky Blinders, The Paper, The Queen's Gambit*, Black Money Love (very irritating at times but a lot of good, can't believe I hung on, probably the longest miniseries ever), Borgen, Clickbait, The Sinner, Deadwind, and Broadchurch. The asterisk signifies especially good. I have seen a number so-called original netflix movies but here I am listing just the miniseries.

I have also Amazon Prime, Britbox, HBO max (free to me) and none of these seem to have the appeal in sheer numbers that Netflix has (I should exclude BritBox from any negativity because I am a Brit Junkie, especially Masterpiece Theater type stuff. They have all the those brilliant Shakespeare BBC productions that were produced in the 70s and 80s, and select BBC miniseries over the years.

Netflix for only $8 a month seems quite a deal. Especially since I am now into slumming. Those shows above are not normally my cuppa but I am being won over. Some of the European shows are quite good. To be sure, I have suspended viewing on a number due to lack of interest. The biggest disappointment is Babylon Berlin, a exceedingly promising show with amazing local color. For some reason, I couldn't stand the lead actress, annoying as heck and I am not even sure why. But the biggest problem (for me) was the management of the story. Just to cryptic to me. I tried to hang in there but finally had to give up because I became damn tired of trying to figure out what the crap was going on. 

 

 

not a fan of THE SQUID GAME  I take it??

;)

 

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14 hours ago, laffite said:

I felt the same way once. However lately I have enjoyed, When Heros Fly*, Fauda, Bodyguard*, Rebellion*, Peaky Blinders, The Paper, The Queen's Gambit*, Black Money Love (very irritating at times but a lot of good, can't believe I hung on, probably the longest miniseries ever), Borgen, Clickbait, The Sinner, Deadwind, and Broadchurch. The asterisk signifies especially good. I have seen a number so-called original netflix movies but here I am listing just the miniseries.

I have also Amazon Prime, Britbox, HBO max (free to me) and none of these seem to have the appeal in sheer numbers that Netflix has (I should exclude BritBox from any negativity because I am a Brit Junkie, especially Masterpiece Theater type stuff. They have all the those brilliant Shakespeare BBC productions that were produced in the 70s and 80s, and select BBC miniseries over the years.

Netflix for only $8 a month seems quite a deal. Especially since I am now into slumming. Those shows above are not normally my cuppa but I am being won over. Some of the European shows are quite good. To be sure, I have suspended viewing on a number due to lack of interest. The biggest disappointment is Babylon Berlin, a exceedingly promising show with amazing local color. For some reason, I couldn't stand the lead actress, annoying as heck and I am not even sure why. But the biggest problem (for me) was the management of the story. Just to cryptic to me. I tried to hang in there but finally had to give up because I became damn tired of trying to figure out what the crap was going on.

My "problem" is that TV series -- mini or otherwise -- don't interest me. I primarily watch movies, and very, very few movies on Netflix grab me. "Worse," my tastes are changing. Fiction is more and more losing its appeal to me. I'm watching more documentaries, "reality TV," and stand-up comedy (most of which I find not very comedic -- too much solipsism and navel-gazing by neurotic comedians who, IMO, should be performing their acts on "the couch" beside a psychoanalyst instead of on the stage in front of an audience). Watching (appallingly overpaid, ridiculously lionized) egomaniacs and exhibitionists play "Dress Up" and "Let's Pretend," and reading "What If?"-"Make Believe" stories just ain't cuttin' it with me anymore.

I also subscribe to Amazon Prime and, via AP, Acorn TV, which my roommate is hooked on. Its British mystery, police, and detective series are like "beets through a baby's backside" (to employ a colorful phrase used by Harlan Ellison) for my flatmate, a "couch potato"-marathoner. Having gorged on and polished off British fare, she's  moved on to French cuisine (currently some policier about a blonde policière).

I subscribe to over half a dozen streaming services, and although "my cup runneth over" entertainment-wise, quite often I find myself endlessly channel-surfing and coming up "beached," finding nothing (that interests me) to watch.

 

 

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16 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

not a fan of THE SQUID GAME  I take it??

;)

 

I watched about 45 seconds of the trailer. I can't stand cruelty. I am really squeamish about that. I couldn't take Dexter. What a premise! A serial killer specialized in killing serial killers. Boy, if you love serial killer stories, this is your baby. The first episode showed someone being tortured. See ya, Charlie, no way. There is another series from some time ago, a bald guy who is a nasty policeman, a real SOB. I was onboard though reluctantly, until he took this guy's head and held it against hot grating of an electric stove. See ya, Charlie, no way. The story was not so bad in some ways though. Can't remember the title and I don't care to look it up. I could stand that stuff when i was younger but I am to old now and identify with everything, no matter how horrible. It's amazing I got through some of that stuff in those shows I mentioned above. But I am not a sissy. I loved Game of Thrones, Breaking bad, and the movie Fargo. So I still have a pair. :lol: Sometimes.

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17 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

My "problem" is that TV series -- mini or otherwise -- don't interest me.

I AM interested in miniseries. I like to find something good that I can binge on over time. Sometimes mere movies are too threadbare. What! Only one episode! I jest, of course. I also have cable and that array of Encore channels. They have a lot really new stuff made as recent as 2020 and even 2021. I try some of it and feel myself on some guilty pleasure trip.  Sometimes it holds me, but often not. If you love suspense, allow me to recommend BODYGUARD, a more suspenseful show you may never find, and done rather well. And they don't waste time. You are thick in it within the first 20 minutes. But you must do it before Netflix 's appointment with the chopping block. ;)

Oh, and it is not excessively long. Just a few episodes.

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21 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

you know, i saw the CIRCUS/CARNIVAL LINE-UP yestersay and was kinda "meh."

WHERE ARE THE HORROR MOVIES AT? IT'S THE 16TH AND THERE HAVE ONLY BEEN A HANDFUL!

Burnt Offerings is on tonight anyway at 10:00 EST. Boy, I sure wish somebody would show The Shuttered Room with Oliver Reed.

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Laffite - I remember mini series from years ago (e.g., Rich Man Poor Man)

Now, last night I watched or re-watched movies I've seen before -  The two Addams Family movies with Anjelica Huston and the late Raul Julia (I had the opportunity to see him on Broadway in 1977 (first time I saw Meryl Streep).  I loved the Addams Family TV show (liked it better than The Munsters).  Those were the days of great TV theme songs.

Christopher Lloyd made a good Uncle Fester (though they never explained the shaving of the head by his "mother."), but Jackie Coogan was the Uncle Fester I remember.  From what I know, he was one of the child stars who kept his mother and stepfather (?) from taking all his money.  

 

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9 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

My "problem" is that TV series -- mini or otherwise -- don't interest me. I primarily watch movies, and very, very few movies on Netflix grab me. "Worse," my tastes are changing. Fiction is more and more losing its appeal to me. I'm watching more documentaries, "reality TV," and stand-up comedy (most of which I find not very comedic -- too much solipsism and navel-gazing by neurotic comedians who, IMO, should be performing their acts on "the couch" beside a psychoanalyst instead of on the stage in front of an audience). Watching (appallingly overpaid, ridiculously lionized) exhibitionists play "Dress Up" and "Let's Pretend," and reading "What If?"-"Make Believe" stories just ain't cuttin' it with me anymore.

I also subscribe to Amazon Prime and, via of which, Acorn TV, which my roommate is hooked on. Its British mystery, police, and detective series are like "beets through a baby's backside" (to employ a colorful phrase used by Harlan Ellison) for my flatmate, a "couch potato"-marathoner. Having gorged on and polished off British fare, she's  moved on to French cuisine (currently some policier about a blonde policière).

I subscribe to over half a dozen streaming services, and although "my cup runneth over" entertainment-wise, quite often I find myself endlessly channel-surfing and coming up "beached," finding nothing (that interests me) to watch.

 

 

(ahem)

YES!!!!!!!!!!

I could not agree more!

 

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15 hours ago, nakano said:

Night of Terror 1933 Foy Produc.dist by Columbia.Directed by Benjamin Stoloff. Bela Lugosi Wallace Ford.Mystery movie in a haunted house,Lugosi is wasted as an Indian servant. Not very good. 65 minutes 5.75/10

NIGHT.jpg

I actually really liked this one quite a bit, the ending is WILD and

(spoiler)

it is a very very rare instance of a CLASSIC FILM (Precode or otherwise) where THE KILLER ESCAPES JUSTICE AT THE END!

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22 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Netflix bites The Big One, as far as I'm concerned. I'd dump it in a New York Minute except that my "domestic partner" is hooked on Grace and Frankie.  However, now that the show has ended, my Netflix subscription is definitely on the chopping block. Very little of what is on Netflix interests and appeals to me.

Regarding Tubi, I dig it. I just wish that it was commercial-free. This past week I watched two British thrillers on Tubi.

The Anatomist is a very talky and dreadfully bloodless British "teleplay" (produced by the notorious Harry Alan Towers) that concerns Burke and Hare and their employer, the titular protagonist Dr. Knox. Not at all thrilling and not much in it to recommend, other than the casting of Michael Ripper. It was a pleasure and a revelation to behold him being given more screen time than he was ever allowed in a Hammer Film* and watch him really ripping into the character of grave robber Hare. Also noteworthy is the always captivating Adrienne Corri who turned in a typically consummate performance. Ditto Alastair Sim (Dr. Knox) who, similar to Corri, immeasurably enhanced the films he was in with his commanding presence.

Shadow Man (née Street of Shadows) is, IMO, a much better mystery-thriller, some might call it Film Noir. Similar to The Anatomist, it offers British film fans the opportunity to see a "minor" character actor granted the opportunity to shine in a beefier dramatic role than he was usually given. In this case, the actor is pinch-faced Victor Maddern, here evoking Lon Chaney as deformed Danny "Limpy" Thomas**, a gofer for boxer-turned-club owner Luigi (Cesar Romero). Among the supporting players are two actresses who would tragically die a few years after appearing in Shadow Man: Kay Kendall and Simone Silva.

* Production manager on The Anatomist was Aida Young, who later would produce some of Hammer's superior chillers during its twilight years.

** A role that, for horror film fans, could be seen as a warm-up to Maddern's monstrous hunchback in Blood of the Vampire.

I have Street of Shadows on DVD through NetworkonAir. It would be a good movie for Noir Alley. The harmonica soundtrack is really unique.

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Caught_(1949_film).jpg

Caught 1949  Director: Max Opuls (or Ophüls)
Starring Robert Ryan, James Mason, Barbara Bel Geddes

Imdb designates this as film-noir, but I'm not sure why. It's not really important, but it's curious. Sometimes I think they just look at the cast or director and maybe the year - like  Robert Ryan, 1949, must be noir.  In my opinion it's not, but is quite good regardless. I think two major points together would disqualify it. One, there's no crime. Just wishing someone dead doesn't count. Failure to render aid in a timely manner could probably qualify, but it's a stretch. Two, it has a happy ending.  I'd call it a romantic melodrama.

Robert Ryan just has a mean looking face and rarely plays the romantic lead.  In Caught he's a mean Howard Hughes-like character who marries poor car-hop Bel Geddes. After a year of marriage hell she leaves him and gets a job working for a handsome doctor, Mason. You can guess the rest.  Art Smith (In a Lonely Place) has a supporting role as Ryan's psychotherapist.  7/10

Caught was the first American film for Mason, who had moved to California after burning his boats in England. "People always ask why I chose to start my Hollywood career with Caught, thinking that I was in a position to chose any film I wanted" he explained. "The truth was that I was desperately broke, needed a job, and this was the nearest thing to an acceptable project that was offered to me."

Not one to toot his own horn, James also did The Reckless Moment for Max Opuls that same year.

Good print free on You Tube

 

 

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21 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

Burnt Offerings is on tonight anyway at 10:00 EST. Boy, I sure wish somebody would show The Shuttered Room with Oliver Reed.

i recall you as being a fan of NIGHT MONSTER (1942), so for you or anyone who is interested, PEACOCK (which is the NBC/UNIVERSAL STREAMING SERVICE which I have strictly because they show good horror movies in October and all the JAWS films in the summer) is showing THE MOST UNCANNILY CLEAR AND PRISTINE PRINT  I HAVE EVER SEEN!

Maybe it's that it's in HD, but HOLY ****, I have NEVER SEEN a PRINT this good looking of any film from the 1940s...it is absolutely WILD to watch, while I'm not a fan of the film, but, it's literally looks like it was shot yesterday.

just wild.

ps- i was not even high at the time!

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On 10/16/2021 at 7:28 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I’m trying hard to make it through RIVERS EDGE (1986), but to be honest with you, I really don’t think it’s very good.

am I alone in this? 
or am I missing something?

(it was on TCM UNDERGROUND)

edit: I only have 12 minutes left of it, but to be honest with you, I don’t even care about sticking around that long.

 

Definitely has not aged well.

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Last night, I watched or re-watched Crossing Delancey (sp?).  Now I wish they (TCM) would show Hester Street (also by Joan M. Silver).  Switched to ABC to watch Melissa Joan Hart win 1 mil on Celebrity Wheel of Fortune, and stayed through The Rookie.  They two funny episodes Dick Van Dyke Show (still relevant today - family burial plots and women drivers).

I always refer to Peter Riegert's character (Sam) as Gus the Pickle Guy because there used to be a Gus's Pickles on the Lower East Side.

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26 minutes ago, Citizen Ed said:

Definitely has not aged well.

THANK YOU!

In viewing it, I felt like one of the dispassionate "teenagers" (a couple of those actors looked 30) looking at that poor dead naked girl. 

Just "meh."

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