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4 minutes ago, nakano said:

In  a rural area in Canada 30 miles from Montreal it looked like a mining town then !

PERFECT!

note: For anyone reading this exchange and wondering what the Hell connection MINING has to the 1966 HAMMER FILM PLAGUE OF THE ZOMBIES, the plot of the movie concerns a sinister British aristocrat who ZOMBIFIES the local villagers to work for free in the dangerous conditions of the local (tin?) mine. Very timely movie, came out the same year as the Aberfan disaster, I think...?

edit: i checked, it did- 1966

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10 hours ago, Aritosthenes said:

The French Dispatch.

 

     LOVELY, Feature Film imho. Slow Slow Pace. Might Not be Everyone's Proverbial Cup of Tea. While Just A Guess, Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Ernie Kovacs Might B Proud ... .

I'm jealous.  How does it hold up to other Anderson films (i'm speaking as a huge fan who doesn't care for Fantastic Mr. Fox or Isle of Dogs- or Grand Budapest Hotel).  I've got a 10 week old at home and can't get to the theater, so the fact this is now playing and I haven't seen the new Bond- i'm itching.

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On 10/25/2021 at 2:19 PM, Katie_G said:

FiveMinutesTo_Live.jpg

I remember this as Door-to-Door Maniac, and as having the worst acting in films ever, but it's now considered a cult classic. I'd put it in the 'So bad it's good' category.  Notable for Pamela Mason and little Ronny Howard in the cast. Good title music by Johnny Cash, who plays an extremely violent character and should have stuck to singing. Total budget was $300,000 and looks it.  A short 72 minute running time is a plus.  I believe TCM is showing this as a "premier" soon, but if you can't wait....

 

 

I DVR'ed this last night but it wasn't shown. It seemed like a technical error. It's been a few years since I last saw it.

If you spent 25 minutes at the concession stand line you wouldn't have missed much.

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2 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I'm jealous.  How does it hold up to other Anderson films (i'm speaking as a huge fan who doesn't care for Fantastic Mr. Fox or Isle of Dogs- or Grand Budapest Hotel).  I've got a 10 week old at home and can't get to the theater, so the fact this is now playing and I haven't seen the new Bond- i'm itching.

(By All Means) Totally not ignoring You with Respect to This.

  Will Get Back With You (Much) Later Tonite Upon This.

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Quote

I DVR'ed this last night but it wasn't shown. It seemed like a technical error. It's been a few years since I last saw it.

I also tried to DVR "Five Minutes to Live" but I think something went haywire at TCM. If I remember correctly, they showed "Spade Cooley, King of Western Swing" and "The Maestro: King of the Cowboy Artists" TWICE in a row.

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Falling from Grace (1992) -- 8/10

Source: TCM

MV5BZDk0N2RjZDgtOWU1Yy00ZmMzLWI2ZTEtZGMw

Falling from Grace is one of the few movies in the subsection where popular recording artists try their hand at directing movies. Usually, it does not work out well, such in the case of Bob Dylan's Renaldo and Clara, Madonna's W/E, or Prince's Under the Cherry Moon and Graffiti Bridge (after he did have a hit with Purple Rain).  And if anything, the paltry box office grosses for this film (less than $250,000)  would normally sound an alarm, as would that Leonard Maltin handed it a "BOMB" rating ,or that an obviously baffled Columbia Pictures moved it out of a planned 1991 release into a cold open in February 1992. But on the opposite end of the review spectrum, it had good notices from Entertainment Weekly and the Chicago Sun-Times, so with that, coupled with the knowledge that the script was written by the esteemed writer Larry McMurtry, I decided to give it a whirl.

The result is a film that is actually pretty good, a saga of a celebrity going back to his home town and not finding a warm welcome. And the title here is literal, as the celebrity (played of course by John Mellencamp), following the weakness of the men in his family of having wandering eyes, goes headlong into a fling with his former flame (Kay Lenz), who he had left behind many years earlier, and who has since become involved with both his father and his brother, marrying the latter. This of course, upsets Mellencamp's up to now tranquil marriage to Mariel Hemingway, and provides even more friction with his lascivious, tough father (Claude Akins). The story is pretty simple, really, but it works.

Although set in Southern Indiana, and filmed in the actual town where Mellencamp grew up, McMurtry's nuanced writing makes it feel more like a spiritual cousin to The Last Picture Show, with a town with a stifling atmosphere, and characters who yearn for something more. As is usual with McMurtry works, the female characters are the ones that linger in the memory, with Mariel Hemingway quite fine as the wife , the moral compass of the film, who is no pushover and who is not afraid to speak up and have her say when things are not right (or for that matter fight back when her father in law makes an advance on her). Meanwhile, Kay Lenz is just stunning in her part, a variation on the Ellen Burstyn role in The Last picture Show. Her role is not the largest, but every time she appears on screen, she gives such an assured, note perfect performance that you can't take your eyes off of her. She's the best thing in the film, a fully three dimensional character. Its awards-worthy work. Mellencamp himself does a lowkey, but good job, and Akins is formidable as the brutal father.

It should be noted that this is a very low-key film for the most part, closer in mood and playing to an early 70s film instead of an early 90s one. Don't go in expecting lots of flash and bombast, because it isn't here. But what is here is a solid film, with a good sense of area atmosphere, so much more confident in feeling for the land and for the people than you would find in something made today. It's very underrated.

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On 10/25/2021 at 8:53 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I understand this completely...to backtrack a bit, I did say it reminded me of the entry, but not that I found it amusing all these years later.

(although I do admit with regret that when I first read the entry on SCREAM BLACULA SCREAM [IN the golden turkey awards BOOK] some 25 (!)  years ago, I howled with laughter....

I also will say that they're right to call out CANDICE BERGEN as a terrible actress.)

EDIT: LATER IN THE BOOK, they call out CANDICE BERGEN as a terrible actress...Sadly, Miss Bergen does not appear in SCREAM, BLACULA, SCREAM. i did not mean to give that impression with my random chain of disjointed thoughts)

Candise Bergen once admitted that she didn't take acting very seriously until she got a repremand on the set of Bite the Bullet. I do think she did improve after that.....

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1 hour ago, Mars said:

I also tried to DVR "Five Minutes to Live" but I think something went haywire at TCM. If I remember correctly, they showed "Spade Cooley, King of Western Swing" and "The Maestro: King of the Cowboy Artists" TWICE in a row.

I wonder if perhaps someone actually watched the film before airing it and panicked.    lol

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My next theme will be Nunnally Johnson: Screenwriter Extraordinaire for 20th Century Fox.  Most of these films are rarely shown on TCM, and cover almost all genres.  For a time he was the highest paid screenwriter in Hollywood.

Desertfoxdvd.jpg...The Desert Fox: The Story of Rommel, 1951

Directed by Henry Hathaway   Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson
Starring James Mason, Jessica Tandy, Leo G Carroll
Drama, War   1 hr. 29 min.

"I'm told you once referred to me as a clown. A clown of Hitler's circus."

Exciting film with realistic battle scenes, some of which WERE real.  Among the British and American cast there was no trace of a German accent, so Rommel sounds just like James Mason.  Thanks to his brilliant portrayal I got over it.       8/10

Full movie on YouTube with good clear print and sound quality

 

 

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WomanintheWindow.jpg...The Woman in the Window, 1944

Directed by Fritz Lang     Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson                                                                                                                                                                                         1 hr. 47 min.  Film-Noir, psychological thriller 
Starring Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett, Raymond Massey, Dan Duryea

Synopsis: As a conservative middle aged professor engages in a relationship with a femme fatale, he's plunged into a nightmarish world of blackmail and murder.

"She's got something on her conscience, but what woman hasn't?"

Largely the same cast as Scarlet Street but a different plot. I don't know which one I like more, but this one has an added bonus for me. As Robinson is being strangled, Bennett doesn't freeze in fear but actually hands him the scissors.    9.5/10

WomanInWindow1.jpg.7fa6bc66d61ab62cc506f68f966a5da1.jpg....YEAH!

 

 

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The Desert Fox: The Story of Rommel, 1951.The final script by Johnson is at the Ohio State University library for researh 119 pages .There is plenty of rare stuff all over in the Universities many stars or execs leaves hundreds of boxes of personnal papers to the universities.

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14 minutes ago, Katie_G said:

WomanintheWindow.jpg...The Woman in the Window, 1944

Directed by Fritz Lang     Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson                                                                                                                                                                                         1 hr. 47 min.  Film-Noir, psychological thriller 
Starring Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett, Raymond Massey, Dan Duryea

Synopsis: As a conservative middle aged professor engages in a relationship with a femme fatale, he's plunged into a nightmarish world of blackmail and murder.

"She's got something on her conscience, but what woman hasn't?"

Largely the same cast as Scarlet Street but a different plot. I don't know which one I like more, but this one has an added bonus for me. As Robinson is being strangled, Bennett doesn't freeze in fear but actually hands him the scissors.    9.5/10

WomanInWindow1.jpg.7fa6bc66d61ab62cc506f68f966a5da1.jpg....YEAH!

 

 

A great film but not the ending Lang wanted because of the production code.

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On 10/25/2021 at 7:46 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

(i kinda wish there had been a remix with JUST THE SPOOKY FALSETTO CHOIR singing "Viiiibe-o-logy...." a capella)

YES!!!

I actually looked for one, but could not find it.

I did find this though.

Starting at  2:28 :

 

 

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It's impossible for me to view Star Dust (1940), an innocuous Hollywood fantasy, without thinking of the real life tragedy which befell its star after viewing this film on television a quarter of a century after its release. I watched the film for the first time this evening.

A standard story of Hollywood wish fulfillment, it was the third film starring a very young Linda Darnell as one of three people going to the film capital (the other two John Payne and Mary Healy), dealing with the standard hopes and emotional heart aches in her desire to become a star. Roland Young is really the film's main character, arguably, as a former silent film star now in the business of trying to recruit new talent for the film capital, in this case a fictional film studio. It's a fairly inconsequential. predictable affair, with a happy ending in which Darnell becomes a hit and is signing her signature in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre, the dream of every would be star. The Hoagy Carmichael standard, "Stardust" plays on the film's soundtrack.

Star Dust (1940) - IMDb

WEIRDLAND: Linda Darnell: Star Dust | Disney aesthetic, Hollywood legends,  Classic movies

Life imitating art. Here is an image of Darnell signing her signature at Grauman's in real life.

Darnell would have a tumultuous and often disappointing film career, as well as personal life. She had a series of innocent ingenue roles at the beginning of her career before hitting a career drought when Fox studio mogul Darryl F. Zanuck lost interest in her after she refused his sexual advances. Starting with Summer Storm and, in particular, Fallen Angel in the mid 40s, however, she had a successful image change by playing hardened temptresses, gaining particularly good reviews in 1949 with A Letter to Three Wives (along with talk of an Oscar nomination which was not realized).

Her '50s career would be a disappointment, though, with film work in Italy as well as America, but no real successes, as she increasingly drank and started to experience weight issues. In 1965 she would be cast in her first film in eight years, a modest B western produced by A. C. Lyles, Black Spurs. It had yet to be released when, on April 9, as Linda stayed at the Glenview, Illinois home of her former secretary and daughter, she and the secretary caught a television broadcast of Star Dust that evening. According to the secretary, they giggled all through it.

The two talked for a while after the film ended before retiring to bed. A while later they would smell smoke and the fire department would be called to the blaze at the home. The secretary and her daughter both managed to escape but firemen found Linda lying by a burning  living room sofa. Darnell would be transferred to the burn unit at Chicago's Cook County Hospital with burns over 80% of her body. She was pronounced dead the morning of April 10. Careless smoking would be blamed for the fire. Both Darnell and the secretary were smokers.

I find it a little eerie that in her final hours Linda Darnell, whose film career in 1965 was at a real low point, would be watching a 25-year-old film of hers in which she played a young ingenue hoping to become a film star. Star Dust's Hollywood happy ending made it all the more ironically tragic what was about to befall the beautiful actress later that same evening.

Close to the final words spoken in Star Dust are those of Sid Grauman to Darnell saying, "And may your success, like the imprints you just made, last forever." I wonder how a 43 year old actress, hearing those words on television 25 years later as she scrambled for roles in movies and smoked her final cigarettes, reacted when she heard those words.

1949 Linda Darnell Chesterfield Cigarettes & Milliken Fashion | Etsy

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11 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I'm jealous.  How does it hold up to other Anderson films (i'm speaking as a huge fan who doesn't care for Fantastic Mr. Fox or Isle of Dogs- or Grand Budapest Hotel).  I've got a 10 week old at home and can't get to the theater, so the fact this is now playing and I haven't seen the new Bond- i'm itching.

Imo; its (Probably) His BEST Work in fact. Though to be fair; i Am.. - Substantially Neuteral with Respect to the Majority of Wes Ander's Work. Dispatch Though IS One of the BEST Films I've Seen This Year (thus far).

The .. Style, Atmosphere, and Ambiance of This Dispatch Feature Actually Reminds me Quite a Bit of Charlie Kaufman. (Synecdoche New York in Particular). (And) For Me at least; that similarity is NOT a Bad Thing.

This French Dispatch Film is (among other descriptives) Quite Relaxing in fact, to sit thru. This typist was thoroughly draw in and "held" by the entirety of the cast here.

(By All And Any Means, i don't neccesarily type/converse in an orthodox fashion. Any (further) Questions Please Lemme Know.)

_

LOVED No Time To Die in fact. Save for TWO (perhaps trivial/minute) "nit-picks"... If You'd Like i Can Definitely Let these two respective cats out of the bag. That Said; both cats might be somewhat spoiler-y.

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13 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

YES!!!

I actually looked for one, but could not find it.

I did find this though.

Starting at  2:28 :

 

 

I like this.

In the inevitable BROADWAY SHOW based on the life of PAULA ABDUL, I think her drug-addled later years should be represented via a lengthy number using THE SLOWED DOWN VERSION OF VIBEOLOGY and lots of EXPRESSIONIST DANCING with SOMBER LIGHTS and BLACK TIGHTS (like a MUMMENSCHANZ thing)

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16 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Candise Bergen once admitted that she didn't take acting very seriously until she got a repremand on the set of Bite the Bullet. I do think she did improve after that.....

A typo, I know, but I love this, I wish CANDICE had chosen CAN-DISE (pronounded CAN-DEESE) as her STAGE NAME....

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92mudlark.jpg... The Mudlark, 1950

Director Jean Negulesco...  Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson
Stars: Irene Dunne as Queen Victoria, Alec Guinness as Benjamin Disraeli, Andrew Ray as Wheeler the "mudlark"

Touching story of an endearing young street orphan who finds a cameo of Queen Victoria in the mud of the Thames and sneaks his way into Windsor Castle looking for her. The fictional story credits their meeting as the catalyst for the Queen coming out of her long mourning and facing her people again. A highlight is Alec Guinness delivering a 7 minute speech as Disraeli.  Was a big hit in Britain and made a star of young Andrew.       7.5/10

Full movie

 

 

 

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Full Movie

How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)
Directed by Jean Negulesco...  Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson
Starring Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall, Betty Grable, William Powell, Rory Calhoun
Comedy Drama  1 hr. 35 min.  Oscar nom for Best Costume Design

Three women set out to find eligible millionaires to marry, but find true love in the process.

Has a 5 minute full orchestra overture to start.

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The_Three_Faces_of_Eve_-_1957_-_poster.p...The Three Faces of Eve 1957 

Directed and Written by Nunnally Johnson
Starring Joanne Woodward, Lee J. Cobb, David Wayne
1 hr. 31 min.

Synopsis: A doctor treats a woman suffering from Multiple Personality Disorder.

"Honey, there's a lot of things you never seen me do before. That's no sign I don't do 'em."

Woodward won the Oscar for her role as Eve in this groundbreaking film.
8/10

Full movie

 

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The_Gunfighter.jpg...The Gunfighter, 1950 

Director Henry King...  Screenplay by William Bowers, William Sellers, Nunnally Johnson (uncredited)
Stars Gregory Peck, Helen Westcott, Karl Malden
Oscar nominated for Best Writing

Notorious gunfighter Jimmy Ringo is tired of killing.  He rides into town to find his true love, who doesn't want to see him. He hasn't come looking for trouble, but trouble finds him around every corner.

 

"He don't look so tough to me."                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             "Well if he ain't so tough, there's been an awful lot of sudden natural deaths in his vicinity."

full movie  8/10

 

 

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23 hours ago, TomJH said:

It's impossible for me to view Star Dust (1940), an innocuous Hollywood fantasy, without thinking of the real life tragedy which befell its star after viewing this film on television a quarter of a century after its release. I watched the film for the first time this evening.

A standard story of Hollywood wish fulfillment, it was the third film starring a very young Linda Darnell as one of three people going to the film capital (the other two John Payne and Mary Healy), dealing with the standard hopes and emotional heart aches in her desire to become a star. Roland Young is really the film's main character, arguably, as a former silent film star now in the business of trying to recruit new talent for the film capital, in this case a fictional film studio. It's a fairly inconsequential. predictable affair, with a happy ending in which Darnell becomes a hit and is signing her signature in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre, the dream of every would be star. The Hoagy Carmichael standard, "Stardust" plays on the film's soundtrack.

Star Dust (1940) - IMDb

WEIRDLAND: Linda Darnell: Star Dust | Disney aesthetic, Hollywood legends,  Classic movies

Life imitating art. Here is an image of Darnell signing her signature at Grauman's in real life.

Darnell would have a tumultuous and often disappointing film career, as well as personal life. She had a series of innocent ingenue roles at the beginning of her career before hitting a career drought when Fox studio mogul Darryl F. Zanuck lost interest in her after she refused his sexual advances. Starting with Summer Storm and, in particular, Fallen Angel in the mid 40s, however, she had a successful image change by playing hardened temptresses, gaining particularly good reviews in 1949 with A Letter to Three Wives (along with talk of an Oscar nomination which was not realized).

Her '50s career would be a disappointment, though, with film work in Italy as well as America, but no real successes, as she increasingly drank and started to experience weight issues. In 1965 she would be cast in her first film in eight years, a modest B western produced by A. C. Lyles, Black Spurs. It had yet to be released when, on April 9, as Linda stayed at the Glenview, Illinois home of her former secretary and daughter, she and the secretary caught a television broadcast of Star Dust that evening. According to the secretary, they giggled all through it.

The two talked for a while after the film ended before retiring to bed. A while later they would smell smoke and the fire department would be called to the blaze at the home. The secretary and her daughter both managed to escape but firemen found Linda lying by a burning  living room sofa. Darnell would be transferred to the burn unit at Chicago's Cook County Hospital with burns over 80% of her body. She was pronounced dead the morning of April 10. Careless smoking would be blamed for the fire. Both Darnell and the secretary were smokers.

I find it a little eerie that in her final hours Linda Darnell, whose film career in 1965 was at a real low point, would be watching a 25-year-old film of hers in which she played a young ingenue hoping to become a film star. Star Dust's Hollywood happy ending made it all the more ironically tragic what was about to befall the beautiful actress later that same evening.

Close to the final words spoken in Star Dust are those of Sid Grauman to Darnell saying, "And may your success, like the imprints you just made, last forever." I wonder how a 43 year old actress, hearing those words on television 25 years later as she scrambled for roles in movies and smoked her final cigarettes, reacted when she heard those words.

1949 Linda Darnell Chesterfield Cigarettes & Milliken Fashion | Etsy

Tom, thank you for the great write-up, both of the pleasant STAR DUST, and of my favorite actress, Linda Darnell’s life and career.  It is indeed ironic that she watched this semi-autobiographical film only hours before her fatal accident.  Even as she was watching the film, she was actually hopeful of a career resurgence, as the director of the yet to be released BLACK SPURS had contacted Linda and informed her that producers were interested in her, and there were some offers for other films.  Unfortunately this was not to be.

Just one correction to this information.  Linda Darnell was only 41 when she died; she was born in  1923. Since starting her career in 1939 at the age of 15 playing romantic leads, in HOTEL FOR WOMEN and DAYTIME WIFE, the latter with Tyrone Power, the studio decided to add a couple of years to her age, making her 17, and having been born in 1921.  While this was soon corrected, the 1921 date persisted and persists in some biographical sketches.  

 

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21 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

In the inevitable BROADWAY SHOW based on the life of PAULA ABDUL, I think her drug-addled later years should be represented via a lengthy number using THE SLOWED DOWN VERSION OF VIBEOLOGY and lots of EXPRESSIONIST DANCING with SOMBER LIGHTS and BLACK TIGHTS (like a MUMMENSCHANZ thing)

I realize you're a talented writer, but geez Louise-you need to direct a movie.  Your ideas are so emotionally creative & incredibly cinematic. Your talent deserves an outlet-get thee to Hollywood North! (Hollywood's for chumps)

18 hours ago, Katie_G said:

Touching story of an endearing young street orphan who finds a cameo of Queen Victoria in the mud of the Thames

A-HA, now I know where the term "Mudlarking" comes from....I subscribe to a Mudlarker's channel. That movie sounds right up my alley, thanks for mentioning it. 

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11 hours ago, Arturo said:

Tom, thank you for the great write-up, both of the pleasant STAR DUST, and of my favorite actress, Linda Darnell’s life and career.  It is indeed ironic that she watched this semi-autobiographical film only hours before her fatal accident.  Even as she was watching the film, she was actually hopeful of a career resurgence, as the director of the yet to be released BLACK SPURS had contacted Linda and informed her that producers were interested in her, and there were some offers for other films.  Unfortunately this was not to be.

Just one correction to this information.  Linda Darnell was only 41 when she died; she was born in  1923. Since starting her career in 1939 at the age of 15 playing romantic leads, in HOTEL FOR WOMEN and DAYTIME WIFE, the latter with Tyrone Power, the studio decided to add a couple of years to her age, making her 17, and having been born in 1921.  While this was soon corrected, the 1921 date persisted and persists in some biographical sketches.  

 

Thanks for the correction about Darnell's age, Arturo. And, as you said, it adds to the irony that Linda was watching a film inspired by her own Hollywood story in those final hours before her death.

I'm a little confused about the circumstances of her death, though. I've read some sources that say Linda got out of the house safely but then went back in looking for the secretary's daughter (who got out another way). Then she met her tragic doom. Other sources, though, don't say anything about Darnell performing this act of heroism. Would you recall, Arturo, whether Darnell initially got out of the house before venturing back in or if that tale is erroneous.

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