Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Thanks for the correction about Darnell's age, Arturo. And, as you said, it adds to the irony that Linda was watching a film inspired by her own Hollywood story in those final hours before her death.

I'm a little confused about the circumstances of her death, though. I've read some sources that say Linda got out of the house safely but then went back in looking for the secretary's daughter (who got out another way). Then she met her tragic doom. Other sources, though, don't say anything about Darnell performing this act of heroism. Would you recall, Arturo, whether Darnell initially got out of the house before venturing back in or if that tale is erroneous.

Don’t really know Tom.  There have been  a number of versions speculating what happened, some quite malicious.  One goes that she was in such a drunken stupor she couldn’t figure out what to do/where to go.  Another said she was more concerned about the $10,000 in cash she had, and went back to retrieve it.  Knowing how she thought of others no matter what, I tend to believe she went looking for the girl.  We will probably never know.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I realize you're a talented writer, but geez Louise-you need to direct a movie.  Your ideas are so emotionally creative & incredibly cinematic. Your talent deserves an outlet-get thee to Hollywood North! (Hollywood's for chumps)

A-HA, now I know where the term "Mudlarking" comes from....I subscribe to a Mudlarker's channel. That movie sounds right up my alley, thanks for mentioning it. 

THE MUDLARK occasionally plays in the Fox Movie Channel.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Arturo said:

Don’t really know Tom.  There have Ben a number of versions speculating what happened, some quite malicious.  One goes that she was in such a drunken stupor she couldn’t figure out what to do/where to go.  Another said she was more concerned about the $10,000in cash she had, and went back to retrieve it.  Knowing how she thought of others no matter what, I tend to believe she went looking for the girl.  We will probably never know.

Thanks, Arturo. I hadn't heard the nasty rumours but I suppose some people always feel compelled to come up with them. You'd think that Linda's secretary, identified in this article as Mrs. Richard Curtis, would have had a more definitive account of what happened in her house that night. After all this time she's probably no longer with us but you'd think she would have told somebody, if only to squelch the rumours. Of course, there's also her 16 year old daughter at the time who may have an account, as well.

the_sheboygan_press_fri__apr_9__1965_.jp

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/26/2021 at 10:00 PM, TomJH said:

It's impossible for me to view Star Dust (1940), an innocuous Hollywood fantasy, without thinking of the real life tragedy which befell its star after viewing this film on television a quarter of a century after its release. I watched the film for the first time this evening.

A standard story of Hollywood wish fulfillment, it was the third film starring a very young Linda Darnell as one of three people going to the film capital (the other two John Payne and Mary Healy), dealing with the standard hopes and emotional heart aches in her desire to become a star. Roland Young is really the film's main character, arguably, as a former silent film star now in the business of trying to recruit new talent for the film capital, in this case a fictional film studio. It's a fairly inconsequential. predictable affair, with a happy ending in which Darnell becomes a hit and is signing her signature in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre, the dream of every would be star. The Hoagy Carmichael standard, "Stardust" plays on the film's soundtrack.

Star Dust (1940) - IMDb

WEIRDLAND: Linda Darnell: Star Dust | Disney aesthetic, Hollywood legends,  Classic movies

Life imitating art. Here is an image of Darnell signing her signature at Grauman's in real life.

Darnell would have a tumultuous and often disappointing film career, as well as personal life. She had a series of innocent ingenue roles at the beginning of her career before hitting a career drought when Fox studio mogul Darryl F. Zanuck lost interest in her after she refused his sexual advances. Starting with Summer Storm and, in particular, Fallen Angel in the mid 40s, however, she had a successful image change by playing hardened temptresses, gaining particularly good reviews in 1949 with A Letter to Three Wives (along with talk of an Oscar nomination which was not realized).

Her '50s career would be a disappointment, though, with film work in Italy as well as America, but no real successes, as she increasingly drank and started to experience weight issues. In 1965 she would be cast in her first film in eight years, a modest B western produced by A. C. Lyles, Black Spurs. It had yet to be released when, on April 9, as Linda stayed at the Glenview, Illinois home of her former secretary and daughter, she and the secretary caught a television broadcast of Star Dust that evening. According to the secretary, they giggled all through it.

The two talked for a while after the film ended before retiring to bed. A while later they would smell smoke and the fire department would be called to the blaze at the home. The secretary and her daughter both managed to escape but firemen found Linda lying by a burning  living room sofa. Darnell would be transferred to the burn unit at Chicago's Cook County Hospital with burns over 80% of her body. She was pronounced dead the morning of April 10. Careless smoking would be blamed for the fire. Both Darnell and the secretary were smokers.

I find it a little eerie that in her final hours Linda Darnell, whose film career in 1965 was at a real low point, would be watching a 25-year-old film of hers in which she played a young ingenue hoping to become a film star. Star Dust's Hollywood happy ending made it all the more ironically tragic what was about to befall the beautiful actress later that same evening.

Close to the final words spoken in Star Dust are those of Sid Grauman to Darnell saying, "And may your success, like the imprints you just made, last forever." I wonder how a 43 year old actress, hearing those words on television 25 years later as she scrambled for roles in movies and smoked her final cigarettes, reacted when she heard those words.

1949 Linda Darnell Chesterfield Cigarettes & Milliken Fashion | Etsy

Somewhere in the past I read that Linda was indirectly responsible for Alice Faye tearing up her contract at 20th Century Fox.  Alice starred in 1945's Fallen Angel with Linda cast as the second female lead.  When Zanuck saw the rushes, he realized Darnell was giving a provocative performance as the sultry waitress and ordered the film re-cut to feature more of her character.  Faye's mousy heiress, in fact, doesn't appear until the movie is well underway.  After watching the finished film at the studio, Faye, in a fit of rage, drove off the lot, tossing her dressing room keys to the guard at the gate, and never returned.   Gossip columnists claim Darnell and Zanuck were having a relationship (I'm trying to be discreet here) and he did champion her career at Fox.  Yet, she was a very good actress in her own right, and gave a remarkable performance in A Letter to Three Wives, often stealing the show from Jeanne Crain and Ann Sothern.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mystery of the Wax Museum (1933) Liked it.

The Bat (1959) Vincent Price.  Felt obligated to watch it due to Halloween as I didn't want to watch another Hammer film this year.  Didn't care for this one.

La Bestia Debe Morir (1952) Liked it but i have two questions regarding the plot that have already been discussed in the noir thread.

Footsteps in the Dark (1941) Errol Flynn as a businessman who is secretly a crime novelist who secretly is helping the police on a murder mystery that he was thrown into the middle of.  Liked it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The_Man_in_the_Gray_Flannel_Suit_-_1955_... The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, 1956

Written & Directed by Nunnally Johnson
Stars Gregory Peck, Jennifer Jones, Fredric March, Lee J. Cobb, and Portland Mason (precocious daughter of James & Pamela) plays Janey. 
Drama, War, Romance  2 hrs. 33 min.

Synopsis: An ex-soldier faces ethical questions as he tries to earn enough to support his wife and children well.

 

"I don't know anything about public relations."
"Who does? You've got a clean shirt and you bathe every day. That's all there is to it."

A veteran from WWII struggles somewhat with PTSD.  We join him 10 years returned with a family and white collar job that he doesn't particularly enjoy, but he seems to be doing okay.  His wife (Jones) is unhappy with their life, wanting to buy a bigger house which they can't afford, etc. This is BEFORE learning about his Italian love child and his new obligation to help support him which causes more resentment at home. 

This resonated with many post-war couples and the film was a hit, but it's a bit too long for my taste. I suspect the whole project was intended as Oscar-bait for Selznick's girlfriend Jennifer Jones, who's a perfectly adequate actress, but nothing to write home about. In my opinion.  6.5/10

Full movie

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Poster_-_Tobacco_Road.jpg...Tobacco Road, 1941
Directed by John Ford ...  Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson
Stars Charley Grapewin, Marjorie Rambeau, Dana Andrews, Gene Tierney (in a small role)                                                                                1 hr. 24 min.  Comedy, Drama

On the other end of the spectrum from Man in the Gray Flannel Suit we have badly dressed hillbillies in 1941 rural Georgia. Based on the book by Erskine Caldwell, the studio was nervous about censorship for the comedic depiction of poor backwoods southerners.

In a 1940 interview John Ford said "We've eliminated the horrible details and what we've got left is a nice dramatic story. It's a tear-jerker, with some comedy relief. What we're aiming at is to have the customers sympathize with our people and not feel disgusted."  I think they partially succeeded. The only place it was banned was in Australia for some reason. 

"How many children we got, Ma?'
"Oh, 17 or 18 head I reckon."
"And ain't none of 'em worth the powder to blow 'em up with!"

I loved it.  So shoot me.  7.5/10

Full movie

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Katie_G said:

Poster_-_Tobacco_Road.jpg...Tobacco Road, 1941
Directed by John Ford ...  Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson
Stars Charley Grapewin, Marjorie Rambeau, Dana Andrews, Gene Tierney (in a small role)                                                                                1 hr. 24 min.  Comedy, Drama

On the other end of the spectrum from Man in the Gray Flannel Suit we have badly dressed hillbillies in 1941 rural Georgia. Based on the book by Erskine Caldwell, the studio was nervous about censorship for the comedic depiction of poor backwoods southerners.

In a 1940 interview John Ford said "We've eliminated the horrible details and what we've got left is a nice dramatic story. It's a tear-jerker, with some comedy relief. What we're aiming at is to have the customers sympathize with our people and not feel disgusted."  I think they partially succeeded. The only place it was banned was in Australia for some reason. 

"How many children we got, Ma?'
"Oh, 17 or 18 head I reckon."
"And ain't none of 'em worth the powder to blow 'em up with!"

I loved it.  So shoot me.  7.5/10

Full movie

 

 

When I was stationed at Ft. Gordon GA back in the 70's, I lived off post and Tobacco Road was part of my commute.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/18/2021 at 3:48 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I would not describe his performance in BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA as "meh."

I could use many many many combinations of words to describe it, but "meh" is not one, nor is "unmemorable."

 

I've heard so much about that performance over the years that it was a surprise when I found out he wasn't up for a Razzie for appearing in it.....

Frankly I'd go to bat to approve a few of the performances that the Razzies hated in 1992 

CECVA8g.png

Seems really odd that they ignored several critical duds that year....

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1939.jesse.james.jpg...Jesse James, 1939

Directed by Henry King...Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson
Stars Tyrone Power, Henry Fonda, Nancy Kelly, Randolph Scott, John Carradine
Western, Crime, Drama  1hr 46 min.  In Technicolor

 

I recently re-watched this to compare with Nicholas Ray's 1957 remake which rewrote Nunnally's original script but reused
some footage - the notorious scene of Frank and Jesse being chased by a posse and reaching a precipice high above a river.  Unlike Butch Cassidy they ride their horses right off the cliff and into the water.  You can tell this was for real and the poor horses which had been blindfolded actually died. It's hard to watch but it was the fallout from this stunt that created stricter standards to protect animals in films by The Humane Society.  In Ray's film the scene is in the first act, in this one it's near the end.

Other differences were the cast, of course. I much preferred Tyrone Power and Henry Fonda over Robert Wagner and Jeffrey Hunter, but all four are ridiculously good looking. This version is much more "talky" than Ray's which I don't care for, especially in Westerns. Not that many action scenes and a whole lotta talking, it seems to take forever to get going.  Ray's starts out with a robbery gone wrong, a shootout, and exciting posse chase.  Yes I'm a girl who likes westerns.

"He was one of the doggonedest, gawl-dingedest, dad-blamedest buckaroos that ever rode across these United States of America!"

full movie

 

 

Nicholas Ray's 1957 remake

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/28/2021 at 5:18 PM, CinemaInternational said:

I've heard so much about that performance over the years that it was a surprise when I found out he wasn't up for a Razzie for appearing in it.....

Frankly I'd go to bat to approve a few of the performances that the Razzies hated in 1992 

Seems really odd that they ignored several critical duds that year....

Even odder that they gave a WSA nom to Danny DeVito for the Batman sequel, he was the only one in the movie who had the right vibe for the original comic.  (Tim Burton and Michael Keaton, sadly, included.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

How to Be Very, Very Popular (1955).

Betty Grable and Sheree North play a couple of burlesque dancers who witness a murder and try to escape, winding up in a small college town.  There, they get protected by a couple of the male students (Bob Cummings, Tommy Noonan, and Orson Bean).  Tedium happens for another 90 minutes.

The movie takes every trope about college and other subjects like hypnosis that Hollywood movies had about such subjects, and turns them up to 11, the result being something terribly insipid and unfunny.  Charles Coburn as the college president can't save the day; nor can normally good character actors like Fred Clark and Alice Pearce.  The script is that bad.

3/10.  It's in the FXM rotation right now, with airings on Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 if you want to watch and judge for yourself.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My movie buddy slipped me a surprise in the pile of disks we exchange per month. It was Mister 880 from 1950, starring Burt Lancaster, Dorothy McGuire & Edmund Gwenn.

Mister_880.jpg

Wiki has this listed as a comedy, but I'd describe it more a lighthearted mystery drama. It's the story of a Secret Service agent (Burt) hired to solve a counterfeiter (Gwenn) who's gone uncaught for over a decade.  This is based upon a true story and is delightful in so many ways, I'm surprised I've never heard of it before.

The opening credits are great too, cluing me in to what this movie was going to be about-remember this disk was a surprise! All performances were stellar, I especially liked McGuire, the first time seeing her as a regular, modern woman. She has a power job too- working at the League of Nations as an interpreter. She takes Burt for a fun ride when they first meet-it was diabolical & I loved it! One scene takes place in an Automat, but I think it's just a set.

Burt is determined to crack this case and as with all detective work in movies, makes a fascinating, winding tale. Apparently it's relatively easy to find a counterfeiter, but not this time.  I can't reveal anything more or it will ruin it. But a really nice enjoyable movie. You know, the kind they used to make.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Bride of the Monster 1955 Rolling M Productions. Directed by Edward D. Wood Jr. Bela Lugosi Tor Johnson as' Lobo'. Not as good as his 'masterpiece' Plan 9 from Outer Space. This is another inept film by Wood. Lugosi has a full lead as a mad scientist with his 'Igor' Tor Johnson. Lugosi is quite good in it,considering his age ,his health & his addictions. Now for the special effects. The victims are strapped to a table with a upside down  salad bowl in sort of stainless steel on their head with 3 big sparks plugs on it, whatever it is...The monster is a giant rubber octopus but the mechanism does not work so the victims must move the tentacles themselves to create movement......This is the only film by Wood to have made a profit (!) surely it did not need much to cover its cost. I could go on but you get the idea. 69 minutes. 4/10

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Invisible Ray 1936.Universal  . Directed by Lambert Hillyer.   Boris Karloff Bela Lugosi.Karloff is a scientist who discovered extremely powerful out of space  signal many times more powerful than radium. He gradually becomes mad,Lugosi is another scientist trying to help but to no avail. Lugosi is not mad. Karloff is the star and it is not the best of the several Karloff Lugosi films.6.50/10  81 minutes

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Weird Woman  1944..Universal . Directed by  Reginald Le Borg. Lon Chaney Jr Anne Gwynne Evelyn Ankers.Another mystery in a series done by Universal in the mid 40's.This film should be plural as 'Weird Women' So Lon is a scientist  and a writer his specialty :  is superstions and their impact on society. In the South Seas he meets a woman in the jungle in a voodoo celebration - i found out there was voodoo in the South Seas-he marries her  right there .She adapted to life in the big city like she was born  there.We again hear the many thoughts of Lon in this film,he was a real thinking man, the 3 women in this film are all crazy about him (?!) I personally think he looks like a basset hound or a beagle,a small dog with long ears anyway not a 'wolf' for sure.I knew he was an idiot when  he dumped his sultry  girlfriend Ankers for Gwynne,as a matter of taste I would choose Ankers, no contest,a bright full figured girlfriend, (her only role as a vilainess). Voodoo stuff happens. Gwynne said Chaney was the actor she liked the least and Evelyn Ankers said he was a brute with bad breath. Excellent print . 63 minutes    6/10

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@KATIE_G:  Since you like TOBACCO ROAD may I suggest you head for YouTube and watch the trailer for another similar type of film?  Heh heh.  😜

The theatrical trailer on YouTube for SCUM OF THE EARTH is 2m 7 secs for your viewing 'pleasure'.  This 1974 movie is also better known as "Poor White Trash II", but "Scum Of The Earth" was the original theatrical title.  An S.F. BROWNRIGG presentation.  Sherald Brownrigg made a few low-budget movies in Texas, USA.  This is one of them. 

TCM has aired at least 1 other of S.F. BROWNRIGG's movies:  Don't Open the Door.  But I don't think TCM has aired "Poor White Trash II/Scum of the Earth" as of yet.

If you have a watch of the trailer you'll notice the narrator makes mention of "what happens below Tobacco Road".  An' it's sleeeeeezy and sweaty and vile! 

ENJOY.  :)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ceiling Zero 1936.    Warner Bros . Directed  and produced by Howard Hawks.James Cagney Pat O'Brien June Travis.The dangers of mail pilots in bad weather conditions.A Hawks film and it shows:  lots of fast talking dialogue,precursor to His Girl Friday, a lot of running around for Travis by Cagney, not a happy ending for both of them.This film is in copyright  hell for about 30 years,probably because the stage play was written by the same man who did the screenplay Frank Wead. Excellent print. Not a great Hawks but a ok one . 95 minutes 7/10

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Badlands of Dakota  1941. Universal . Directed by Alfred E Green. Robert Stack Ann Rutherford Richard Dix Frances Farmer Broderick Crawford Lon Chaney Jr.A great cast for an average western,not a B western but between A & B.Fake indians attacking a remote city for the land. Dix as Wild Bill Hickok  is wasted so is beautiful Farmer as a calamity jane type-her name is Jane ! I will not comment on Robert Stack, Could have been a  better film  . 74 minutes 6/10

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ivanhoe  1982. Columbia Pictures for television. Directed by Douglas Camfield. James Mason (top billed) Anthony Andrews (Ivanhoe) Sam Neill Olivia Hussey. Made for tv  this could have been released in theatres,well done ,closer to the real story by Walter Scott. Excellent acting by everybody,Neill is such a great villain ! Hussey at 31 is extremely beautiful, a natural beauty.The anti semitism in 1194's  England is clearly depicted in this film. In Sweden apparently it is showed every year between Christmas and NewYear's. Nice UK scenery. 142 minutes 8/10

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Texas 1941.  Columbia Pictures.  Directed by George Marshall. Glenn Ford William Holden Claire Trevor and a very good supporting cast. Between an  A & a B film,with a good budget. Two friends,one goes straight and the other not so honest, good story with Claire Trevor involved with both  friends....Ford and Holden both started their career in 1939,Ford got better roles faster than Holden who bloomed in 1950-(thank you Billy Wilder).They had similar careers but no Oscar(I think ) for Glenn during his lifetime. A good film. 93 minutes 7/10

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

From the weekend:

The Conjuring 2 (2016) Not as scary as the first but still has  its moments.

The Little Hut (1957) A rather stupid film but damn, Ava Gardner was smokin.

Spider Baby (1968)  Hmmm, this was interesting.  Not sure how to describe this film other than it was to be seen to be believed.  Late starring role for horror legend Lon Chaney Jr and an early role for future horror icon Sid Haig.  Rather creepy classic horror film.  Recommend.

The Gay Falcon (1941) Picked up the first of 2 DVD collections of the Falcon series.  First time watching any of the films.  Thought it was pretty good.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Private Worlds 1935 .  Paramount  Pictures.  Directed by Gregory La Cava. Claudette Colbert Charles Boyer Joan Bennett Joel McCrea Helen Vinson. Good cast on a touchy subject at the time in the world of mental institutions,apparently the first film where the word schizophrenia is mentionned,Colbert is a psy who must deal with a new head of the institution,Boyer, who is more conservative in his approach of the illnesses . a bit old .Great cast. 84 minutes 6.50 /10

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

SPIDER BABY was filmed back in 1964, btw. 

Google and wikipedia say 1967.  Looks like either way i was wrong.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...