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14 hours ago, TomJH said:

Shoot To Kill (1988)

I love this one. It was a great comeback for Sidney Poitier (he hadn't acted in a film for a decade).  The stunt across the ravine was eye popping, this was before CGI so that was a real live stunt man swinging on that rope. Another thing I liked was how we did not know at first who the villain was, Kirstie Alley was the guide to a bunch of guys, many who are acting suspicious. Add to that was the fact that some were played by actors known for villainous portrayals. Andy Robinson was the psycho from Dirty Harry (1971), Richard Masur played a child molester in a 1981 TV movie Fallen Angel and Clancy Brown played The Creature in the Frankenstein inspired film The Bride (1985)

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

The moment I made my post realized I had forgotten to mention Mae Questel's delightful bookend charactor in the opening & closing of A MAJORITY OF ONE '61. It was the only time I've seen her in color. She played a nosy & racist neighbor& was FABULOUS!

4.JPG

 

She was also in a few others, like Funny Girl, if you've seen that...

Gertrude Flynn, Omar Sharif, Mae Questel, Penny Santon Spieler Nick  Arnstein (Omar Sharif) pokert mit den alten Damen. *** Local Caption ***  1968, Funny Girl, Funny Girl Stock Photo - Alamy

 

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19 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Swithin,  for some reason, maybe because I think of you as an honourary Brit  ( even though I know you hail from NYC),  I thought you might have heard something about Belfast, possibly even seen it.

Haven't seen it yet, but I've heard good things from friends who have.  From what I've read about it, it reminds me of Terence Davies' great films, including The Long Day Closes and Of Time and the City, which is Davies' documentary about Liverpool, his home town.

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51 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Haven't seen it yet, but I've heard good things from friends who have.  From what I've read about it, it reminds me of Terence Davies' great films, including The Long Day Closes and Of Time and the City, which is Davies' documentary about Liverpool, his home town.

I saw it last week.  I posted a little write-up about it on the previous page here.

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9 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I saw it last week.  I posted a little write-up about it on the previous page here.

I saw your interesting post. In addition to Branagh and Dench, I like Ciaran Hinds, whom I've seen on stage a lot, most recently in Brian Friel's Translations a few years ago. I'm a big fan of Branagh, whom I first saw in his London stage debut, as Judd in Another Country in 1983. I last saw him on stage in The WInter's Tale in 2015which also starred Judi Dench.

 

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Last night I watched two movies with Richard Gere - Norman (too long to go into full title).  It is about a man (Jewish - even though Gere isn't) named Oppenheim or Oppenheimer, who connects with the (fictional) Israeli Prime Minister (or some Israeli official).  He is a lost man who needs to make money.  One scene that I believe is true - Gere's character seems to have nowhere to live - he eats herring on crackers (in other words - he keeps kosher); cut to Israeli official who is dining on traif or non-kosher oysters.  Gere, still great looking - should have at least been nominated for an Oscar.  Then I watched Pretty Woman (which I have seen many times before - never saw it as a feminist film (and there was an alternate darker version).

Re-watched Charade (great film - Walter Matthau is one of the standouts) on TCM followed by Stealing Home.  It was never explained why Foster's character killed herself.  Mark Harmon was the lead - didn't resemble his younger self physically).  It was made around the time he became very popular thanks to St. Elsewhere (his character died of AIDS.

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14 minutes ago, ElCid said:

OK, now I am confused by your post.

well, before I titled my thread about THE CONSTIPATED EMOJI, I wanted to make sure THE AUTOCENSOR didn't **** it out, so my post would have been titled "I THINK THIS SITE SHOULD GET RID OF THE **** EMOJI" which would SURELY have caused ALL KINDS of confusion.

this particular thread seemed like a safe place to run the test.

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The King of Cool (2021)

Loved it.  I'm a huge rat pack fan  and this was right up my alley.  Four things are guaranteed to make me cry every time- the ending of Old Yellar, any mention of Where theRed Fern Gows, Jim Henson's funeral and seeing Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis reunite.  There was quite a few things I learned about Dean from this doc, and also about Lewis.  Thoroughly enjoyed this.

I don't know that i'd seen Deana Martin on screen in quite a few years.  When i lived in Hollywood about 20 years ago i always listened to her on the radio where she played the great american songbook standards- i believe she always had a bird with her on the air.  She was also in one of my favorite films, Swingers, but i can't point her out in it.

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1 minute ago, Shank Asu said:

 

I don't know that i'd seen Deana Martin on screen in quite a few years.  When i lived in Hollywood about 20 years ago i always listened to her on the radio where she played the great american songbook standards- i believe she always had a bird with her on the air.  She was also in one of my favorite films, Swingers, but i can't point her out in it.

and now i know why- that is a different actress, Deena Martin.  I always figured it was Dean's daughter that was in the film because i know Jon Favreau is a hug Dean fan and was opened multiple films with one of his songs.

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Slack Bay.

Out of My League.

    Two Lovely Breezy Thru and Thru Comedies. Quite Charming and Enjoyable.

Quite Similar In Vibe and Atmosphere to Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines, (the) Brothers Bloom, Love Me If You Dare, The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet, and perhaps Ruby Sparks.

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Thanks to the movie buddy who posted Jennifer. If you are a fan of Ida Lupino or the cinematographer James Wong Howe or you would like to see and hear Matt Dennis sing his great song "Angel Eyes"--yes to all three in my case--this is worth an hour and fifteen minutes of your time. Howard Duff is more attractive in this film than I've ever seen him before; he's like a slightly rougher and raspier brother of James Garner. He and Lupino had chemistry off screen too, and they married.

The story has familiar elements. Ida applies for the job of caretaker at a mostly abandoned mansion, replacing Jennifer, the previous caretaker, who disappeared. Or was she murdered? Or did she ever exist? I'm not sure the script came up with the best alternative, but that happens. James Wong Howe provides some noir lighting and some beautifully composed moments, and some of the scenes where Ida searches the house and the grounds could have come from Antonioni or Antonioni-influenced films like Fists in the Pocket and Visconti's Sandra. IMDB doesn't list any locations, but there are shots that look like Santa Barbara.

Curiously, "Angel Eyes," a song about a femme fatale, is used in a film without a femme fatale. Dancing to the song helps awaken Ida's interest in Howard Duff.

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On 11/20/2021 at 3:23 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was disappointed that I missed WILD AT HEART (1990) when it aired on TCM UNDERGROUND some months ago, lucky for me they re ran it and i caught it this am.

See the source image

This is wild, because it has been 30 years since I have seen this movie, but as a 13 year old in 1991, my family stole pay-per-view and this ran 24 hours a day on endless loop for about a month in the SPRING TIME and I watched it SO MANY TIMES, and IT SPOKE TO ME ON MANY LEVELS- I will also note that I am from WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA (aka CAPE FEAR- the setting of this movie)- although it seems as if a goodly chunk of it is shot in California passing for Texas and NC/SC, although I may be wrong.

There are so many things I remember about this movie, which was in many ways a seminal viewing experience for me and (in retrospect) one of the most influential films of the 1990s...

i'll go ahead and get the fact that the ending is a sloppy mess out of the way, also the fact that NICOLAS CAGE gives a failed performance that ultimately hurts the film, he sounds like MR BURNS doing ELVIS...

 

THERE IS ONE PARTICULAR SCENE that could have been the highpoint of the movie, where LAURA DERN'S character tells him she is pregnant and he is elated...only she follows up that she does not want the baby and CAGE (and DAVID LYNCH whiff the scene,) in the end, WILLAM DAFOE walks off with the (debateably) best scene in the film soon after. HOWEVER, CAGE is one of those actors like CHARLTON HESTON or ELIZABETH TAYLOR who can allow a huge movie to hang on their shoulders while giving a watchable or highly amusing failed performance for which one gets ones nickel's worth in the end.

growing up, I knew A LOT of LAURA DERNS and LAURA DERN is great in this movie, especially in the end when she serves KIM BASINGER IN LA CONFIDENTIAL LEVEL OLD  HOLLYWOOD 1990s GLAMOUR REVIVAL at the end

See the source image

sadly, her performance ends up suffering because she isn't getting what she needs in return from CAGE as her onscreen PARTnER.

I HAD TO STOP THIS MOVIE MANY TIMES BECAUSE IT OVERWHELMED MY SENSES.

[spoilers]

Even though there are things that don't work- IT'S A GORGEOUS FILM, and a very watchable 2 hours and five minutes, it is THE ESSENCE OF 1990S NEO NOIR (happy ending aside.) The locations are hypnotically feculant, HARRY DEAN STANTON is great (the ONE understated performance), GRACE ZABRISKIE is in this looking like MAGGIE SIMPSON'S UNIBROW BABY ARCHENEMY PLAYING THE ANJELICA HUSTON ROLE IN THE GRIFTERS and ISABELLA ROSSELINI made me wish she had played the ANNETTE BENNING PART in that film she is such sinister feline perfection in her small part.

the cinematography IN THIS FILM should have been nominated.

Also, even though DAVID LYNCH'S dialogue is not good, HE KNOWS IT and he doesn't try to act like it isn't, on the visual points and the pacing he succeeds so much, I ain't mad.

Have you read Sailor and Lula?

510sdM+syHL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

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On 11/21/2021 at 9:12 AM, TikiSoo said:

The moment I made my post realized I had forgotten to mention Mae Questel's delightful bookend charactor in the opening & closing of A MAJORITY OF ONE '61. It was the only time I've seen her in color. She played a nosy & racist neighbor& was FABULOUS!

4.JPG

 

She also had a very memorable appearance as Woody Allen's brassy mother in the final part of New York Stories in 1989. Stole the entire film.

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On 11/21/2021 at 8:12 AM, TikiSoo said:

The moment I made my post realized I had forgotten to mention Mae Questel's delightful bookend charactor in the opening & closing of A MAJORITY OF ONE '61. It was the only time I've seen her in color. She played a nosy & racist neighbor& was FABULOUS!

 

Mae Questel was also memorable as Aunt Bethany in CHRISTMAS VACATION.

 

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J'irai Cracher Sur Vos Tombes 1959 (I Spit On Your Graves--no link to the notorious America grindhouse film of the 1970s)

Based on the 1946 noir novel by French author Boris Vian, it's about a harmonica-playing tough guy (Christian Marquand) out for revenge when his brother is lynched. The story takes place in the American south of the 1950s viewed through a Gallic lens with French actors so it has a bizarre, twilight zone tone, similar to how London is depicted in the West German Edgar Wallace films.  The novel is much more brutal than the movie and would have been unfilmable in 1959.

Vian was a jazz buff and fan of American noir. As he watched the movie version of his novel, he went into a rage and collapsed, dying on the way to a hospital. Criticism doesn't get more negative than that.

MV5BNjc3ZmQyM2MtYWQ3OC00NjYwLWFhMjAtMjdhNjIwM2E1YmNkXkEyXkFq.jpg

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The_man_I_lovesmall.jpg...  1947     Directed by Raoul Walsh    1h 36m

Ida Lupino, Robert Alda, Martha Vickers, Bruce Bennett, Alan Hale

 

Someday he'll come along, The man I love
And he'll be big and strong, The man I love 
And when he comes my way, I'll do my best to make him stay..

 

The Gershwin title song is prominently featured throughout the film, along with a few other nice tunes. It's not a musical, but it has more music than most non-musicals. It's different, I liked it a lot. 

The plot is, well, not as important as the atmosphere, jazzy vibe, and snappy dialogue. Ida plays another chanteuse, who moves back to LA from New York to be with her extended family.  She's hired immediately by Alda, a slick, mobbed-up nightclub owner.  Her singing is dubbed but she's fabulous and looks like a million bucks in her gorgeous gowns.  They fit her so tightly that she fainted during filming and the dress had to be cut off.

The man she loves is a handsome but troubled pianist (Bennett) who can't get over his ex-wife, Mildred Pierce.  Just kidding, but if he looks familiar that's why.   Oh, my favorite part was seeing Ida knock a gun out of a guy's hand and slap his face six times in rapid succession.  She was awesome. 

"Well, well, the people you run into when you aren't carrying a gun."

full movie

 

 

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I Spent Friday night in a hotel and, for some reason, caught ALTERED STATES (1979?) on some incarnation of HBO (which I don't get at home) just as it was starting.

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"Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue..."

About 40 minutes into it- when WILLIAM HURT goes to see THE SHAMANS in the MOUNTAINS, I realized that this film was going to require more commitment from me the viewer than i could muster (it was the evening of Thanksgiving and I was tired) so i went to sleep...but i would like to finish it someday if i gets the chance.

but in spite of the awkward dialogue- which the actors handled well- and the fact that KEN RUSSELL was "the 27th choice" to direct, what I watched was mostly pretty compelling due in very large part to the actors managing some OFF THE WALL exchanges quite well.

I don't like WILLIAM HURT, but I do respect the talent. also, in the 1980's I recall his being referred to as a "himbo" which I did not get at the time, but now that  I have seen BROADCAST NEWS and BODY HEAT and some of this, I 100% see where people were coming from.

I wouldn't mind finishing this if I ever get the chance, BLAIR BROWN (later on THE DAYS AND NIGHTS OF MOLLY DODD) costars and she has a lot of topless scenes and her breasts are magnificent.

(Judge me for saying it, but they are.)

That KEN RUSSELL was a MACADAMIA, man.

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I also was able to check out POLYESTER (1981) on TCM UNDERgROUND....

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It is rather appropriate this this film begins with a long aerial shot of several suburban ****-de-sac as the credits unfold, because the movie is rife with themes and plot points that takes us for a ride around, but never really deliver us nowhere...still watchable though.

I had forgotten how little TAB HUNTER is in this.

I tried to find a youtube video of MICHAEL KAMEN performing LU LU'S THEME from this movie, but I could only locate the title song song by TAB HUNTER.

 

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I Spent Friday night in a hotel and, for some reason, caught ALTERED STATES (1979?) on some incarnation of HBO (which I don't get at home) just as it was starting.

About 40 minutes into it- when WILLIAM HURT goes to see THE SHAMANS in the MOUNTAINS, I realized that this film was going to require more commitment from me the viewer than i could muster (it was the evening of Thanksgiving and I was tired) so i went to sleep...but i would like to finish it someday if i gets the chance.

but in spite of the awkward dialogue- which the actors handled well- and the fact that KEN RUSSELL was "the 27th choice" to direct, what I watched was mostly pretty compelling due in very large part to the actors managing some OFF THE WALL exchanges quite well.

(Judge me for saying it, but they are.)

That KEN RUSSELL was a MACADAMIA, man.

It's the most "normal" Ken Russell film yet (or maybe Billion Dollar Brain), so...there's that.  Once you get past the mountain-mushrooms scenes in the first half, that's about as Russell-y as it gets until the climax--Where it deviates from its otherwise "Monster on the Campus remake" formula considerably.

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POLYESTER (1981) is really Divine's movie.  He carries the acting load as the put-upon suburban housewife. 

At the time DIVINE (Harris Glenn Milstead) died on March 7, 1988  I had recently seen him in "Lust in the Dust" on cable.  I'd never seen or heard of him before viewing "Lust in the Dust".  And then he was gone.  I saved a lengthy article from the Palm Beach Post (West Palm Beach, FL) which ran March 9, 1988.  He had slowly-but-surely been making "mainstream" inroads and then it was over . . . he was 42. 

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