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This  civil defense film TCM presented after "It! The Terror From Beyond Space"

Are you kidding me? :lol:

 

 

So remember folks, the survival of your house during a nuclear attack depends upon keeping it clean, tidy and more inportant WELL PAINTED. :wacko:

 

If "The Onion" ever make film shorts it will look like that.

I'm reposting the film short in the "Funny Stuff"- Off Topics forum.

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3 hours ago, hamradio said:

So remember folks, the survival of your house during a nuclear attack depends upon keeping it clean, tidy and more inportant WELL PAINTED. :wacko:

 

I know it seems supremely stupid, but old lead based paint does actually create a thin surface barrier in lower temperatures. Atomic bomb heat? No, but if your structure was in a fringe edge zone, may prevent a spontaneous flash fire. 

I actually have a 100 year old wood sculpture in my shop that was in a blazing fire. It's amazing to see how the lead paint reacted & protected the wood from actually burning away-although it's surface is singed & charred in areas.

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I know it seems supremely stupid, but old lead based paint does actually create a thin surface barrier in lower temperatures. Atomic bomb heat? No, but if your structure was in a fringe edge zone, may prevent a spontaneous flash fire. 

I actually have a 100 year old wood sculpture in my shop that was in a blazing fire. It's amazing to see how the lead paint reacted & protected the wood from actually burning away-although it's surface is singed & charred in areas.

 

Like the movie before it,  "It! The Terror From Beyond Space"(1958) someone should remind Elon Musk be sure to lay in a supply of guns, bullets, crate full of grenades, a bazooka, poison gas before heading to Mars. :wacko:

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqipLf1CFzWzrbfrNRCKw

maxresdefault.jpg

 

Yeah pray there are no "chin tongued" bullet proof Martians.

5fc68cc850e71a00115583e2?width=700

 

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10 hours ago, hamradio said:

This  civil defense film TCM presented after "It! The Terror From Beyond Space"

Are you kidding me? :lol:

 

 

So remember folks, the survival of your house during a nuclear attack depends upon keeping it clean, tidy and more inportant WELL PAINTED. :wacko:

 

If "The Onion" ever make film shorts it will look like that.

I'm reposting the film short in the "Funny Stuff"- Off Topics forum.

This version was actually released by a made-up "bureau" (National Clean Up - Paint Up - Fix Up Bureau) which was an invention of the trade group National Paint, Varnish and Lacquer Association.  They wanted to sell more paint.

They repurposed the original one ,made in  B&W and created by the Civil Defense Administration.   It was a test of the effects of a nuclear blast on a typical low-density suburban landscape

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-05-08/in-1954-americans-were-told-to-paint-their-houses-to-increase-their-chances-of-surviving-an-atomic-bomb

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

This version was actually released by a made-up "bureau" (National Clean Up - Paint Up - Fix Up Bureau) which was an invention of the trade group National Paint, Varnish and Lacquer Association.  They wanted to sell more paint.

They repurposed the original one ,made in  B&W and created by the Civil Defense Administration.   It was a test of the effects of a nuclear blast on a typical low-density suburban landscape

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2013-05-08/in-1954-americans-were-told-to-paint-their-houses-to-increase-their-chances-of-surviving-an-atomic-bomb

This is fascinating--great find!

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Hiroshima, Mon Amour (1959).

Emmanuelle Riva plays a French actress making an anti-nuke film in Hiroshima, where she's met a married Japanese architect (Eiji Okada) with whom she has a brief affair that involves them talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking.  Riva talks about her experience in a small city in France in the war where she fell in love with a German soldier that provides the only respite, but even that segment ends ambiguously and rather poorly.

There's a segment of the population that thinks foreign movies are pretentious and baffling, and a segment of critics that praise such movies simply because they don't do things the way Hollywood does.  Hiroshima, Mon Amour is an archetype of this, a lot of talk that adds up to very little but gets a lot of praise for no good reason.

3/10.  It'll be part of TCM Imports tonight, so you can watch and judge for yourself.  (The other film, Kapo, is much better.)

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51 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Hiroshima, Mon Amour (1959).

Emmanuelle Riva plays a French actress making an anti-nuke film in Hiroshima, where she's met a married Japanese architect (Eiji Okada) with whom she has a brief affair that involves them talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking.  Riva talks about her experience in a small city in France in the war where she fell in love with a German soldier that provides the only respite, but even that segment ends ambiguously and rather poorly.

There's a segment of the population that thinks foreign movies are pretentious and baffling, and a segment of critics that praise such movies simply because they don't do things the way Hollywood does.  Hiroshima, Mon Amour is an archetype of this, a lot of talk that adds up to very little but gets a lot of praise for no good reason.

3/10.  It'll be part of TCM Imports tonight, so you can watch and judge for yourself.  (The other film, Kapo, is much better.)

 

Is that the excuse the architect used to tell his wife, Honestly honey nothing happened we only talked and talked? ;):P

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18 hours ago, hamradio said:

This  civil defense film TCM presented after "It! The Terror From Beyond Space"

Are you kidding me? :lol:

 

 

So remember folks, the survival of your house during a nuclear attack depends upon keeping it clean, tidy and more inportant WELL PAINTED. :wacko:

 

If "The Onion" ever make film shorts it will look like that.

I'm reposting the film short in the "Funny Stuff"- Off Topics forum.

I loved how they show the interior of the house and went on about how if you don't pick up your newspapers and clutter, you're more likely to get destroyed in a nuke explosion.  I wonder if Marie Kondo could include this in one of her programs.

Apparently, not only is cleanliness next to godliness - bad housekeeping is next to communism.

 

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16 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

the trade group National Paint, Varnish and Lacquer Association.  They wanted to sell more paint.

They used to offer a high quality, US made product. Unfortunately, because citizens used & disposed lead & oil base paint incorrectly, they are pretty much banned in the US. Water based latex paints do not adhere to a surface the same way and offer little protection. 

8 hours ago, rosebette said:

Apparently, not only is cleanliness next to godliness - bad housekeeping is next to communism.

Well bad housekeeping is a health hazard. And bad exterior property maintenance lowers the value of your property, as well as those adjoining. 

Since you all enjoy these "educational/promotional" shorts, I urge you to visit AVGEEKS.com. You can buy DVD transfers of "Atomic Scare, Sex Ed, Drug Scare" etc video compilations.  Sure wish kids today knew basic manners-imagine these were shown in the CLASSROOM!

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9 hours ago, rosebette said:

I loved how they show the interior of the house and went on about how if you don't pick up your newspapers and clutter, you're more likely to get destroyed in a nuke explosion.  I wonder if Marie Kondo could include this in one of her programs.

I don't think either one of those interiors would bring Marie joy, but as a "Hoarders" fan, I was very disappointed in their lame example of clutter.  What I'm still wondering about is what happened to the piece of plastic the tidy housekeeper was using to cover the easy chair.  Did it melt?

I also wonder if the National Clean-up, Paint-up, Fix-up Bureau, got sued by the National Newspaper, Magazine, Periodicals Bureau.

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Cover Up (1949)

An insurance investigator arrives in a small American town to investigate the suicide of a prominent citizen but runs into residents, including the town sheriff, who are politely non cooperative with him as he tries to pursue the case. It doesn't take long before he starts to suspect he is investigating a murder.

Decent mystery drama but with an emphasis upon small town folksiness rather than shadowy figures or melodramatic thrills. Dennis O'Keefe is likable as the insurance man who is lucky enough to meet and start dating a beautiful town girl (the lovely Barbara Britton) who, as the film progresses, may be more involved in the case than he initially realized. William Bendix, top billed in the film though really in support to O'Keefe, plays the sheriff who responds coyly to the insurance man's questions. He's not rude or snarky in his refusal to give direct answers. In fact Bendix is quite affable, in many respects, but he still acts like a cat who swallowed a canary in his responses.

Do not view this film with the expectation you will be seeing a film noir, though I'm sure some will try to say it has elements of noir. It's a fairly straight forward mystery, intriguing enough and pleasant due to its performances (O'Keefe's insurance agent character is a nice guy, not the hard boiled character he effectively played in a few genuine noirs like T Men and Raw Deal). The film's final resolution brings up an interesting (if unoriginal) moral quandry in dealing with the complexities of justice and right and wrong when, under some circumstances, the murder victim involved simply doesn't deserve any sympathy.

Cover Up (1949) – Mike's Take On the Movies ………. Rediscovering Cinema's Past

2.5 out of 4

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The other night, re-watched Broadcast News.  It is still relevant today.  All William Hurt has to do is look good even though he is incompetent and not exactly ethical.  However, Aaron (A. Brooks) and Holly Hunter have that life-long (almost) best friend/I love you relationship.  One spoiler - Albert Brooks sweats profusely while trying to be a network anchor.

Last night, watched Stepmom (but refused to stay for the last few minutes - spoiler - Susan Sarandon's character is dying).  Ed Harris, Julia Roberts, and the young actors who play the son and daughter round out a very watchable movie.

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Heh.....

My wife, who WAS a stepmom, didn't like that one.  My daughters(also stepchildren) weren't impressed either.   Being a stepson myself, I found I couldn't relate to most of the "step parent-step child"  movies made that I've seen. 

Sepiatone

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19 hours ago, Fedya said:

Hiroshima, Mon Amour (1959).

Emmanuelle Riva plays a French actress making an anti-nuke film in Hiroshima, where she's met a married Japanese architect (Eiji Okada) with whom she has a brief affair that involves them talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking, and talking.  Riva talks about her experience in a small city in France in the war where she fell in love with a German soldier that provides the only respite, but even that segment ends ambiguously and rather poorly.

There's a segment of the population that thinks foreign movies are pretentious and baffling, and a segment of critics that praise such movies simply because they don't do things the way Hollywood does.  Hiroshima, Mon Amour is an archetype of this, a lot of talk that adds up to very little but gets a lot of praise for no good reason.

3/10.  It'll be part of TCM Imports tonight, so you can watch and judge for yourself.  (The other film, Kapo, is much better.)

I haven't seen this film in over 20 years but i remember it left quite a strong impression on me in college.  The opening specifically.  I'd like to re-watch it and see what i think of it now.

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From the long weekend:

The Falcon in Danger (1943) Decent entry in the series.  6 down.  The way the fiance leaves the Falcon at the ending is rather hilarious.  This series really should find better ways of having characters leave the story.  

Johnny O'Clock (1947) Enough has been mentioned about this already, but i did like it and didn't think the plot was as difficult to understand as Eddie led it to be.

D.O.A. (1950) Classic noir.  Great opening.  Short and sweet film.

Niagara (1953) First time watching this Monroe classic and thought it was flawed story but entertaining.  I did predict who it was that Monroe's character identified at the morgue, but i thought the better film would've been having (SPOILERS) Monroe trying to escape from her husband and the couple from the motel having to help her rather than having Monroe get killed off and the husband trying to get help to start a new life.  Supposedly the script was already changed to make Monroe featured more, but i think she isn't featured enough.  Liked seeing the grandfather from John Hughes' Sixteen Candles in this.

Bus Stop (1956) Another classic Monroe film.  I found the story to be silly but it was fun film to watch. Not familiar with Don Murray before.  Having done that bus ride from Montana to Phoenix , i probably liked this film more than i should.

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10 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

From the long weekend:

Niagara (1953) First time watching this Monroe classic and thought it was flawed story but entertaining.  I did predict who it was that Monroe's character identified at the morgue, but i thought the better film would've been having (SPOILERS) Monroe trying to escape from her husband and the couple from the motel having to help her rather than having Monroe get killed off and the husband trying to get help to start a new life.  Supposedly the script was already changed to make Monroe featured more, but i think she isn't featured enough.  Liked seeing the grandfather from John Hughes' Sixteen Candles in this.

If it had been made a few years later, or 20 years earlier, they could have done this.  But (SPOILER) since Monroe's character was having an affair, the production code wouldn't let her get by with that and start a new life.

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2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

If it had been made a few years later, or 20 years earlier, they could have done this.  But (SPOILER) since Monroe's character was having an affair, the production code wouldn't let her get by with that and start a new life.

That makes sense.

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2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

If it had been made a few years later, or 20 years earlier, they could have done this.  But (SPOILER) since Monroe's character was having an affair, the production code wouldn't let her get by with that and start a new life.

Niagara is a good example where the production code lead to a more noir (darker) film,  and one that is more balanced (as it relates to the character of the husband and wife).

Oh,  and the wife didn't just have an affair;   she was in a relationship and one strong enough where she was able to convince her boyfriend to kill her husband.

 

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On 11/27/2021 at 12:38 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I also was able to check out POLYESTER (1981) on TCM UNDERgROUND....

See the source image

It is rather appropriate this this film begins with a long aerial shot of several suburban ****-de-sac as the credits unfold, because the movie is rife with themes and plot points that takes us for a ride around, but never really deliver us nowhere...still watchable though.

I had forgotten how little TAB HUNTER is in this.

I tried to find a youtube video of MICHAEL KAMEN performing LU LU'S THEME from this movie, but I could only locate the title song song by TAB HUNTER.

 

I had no idea this was on until I was switching channels late that night. I stayed up until the wee hours watching this and Lust in the Dust (which I think is funnier and more entertaining. Also Tab had a better role! He was wasted in Polyester)  When I saw Polyester it was a revival so didnt get to experience the SCRATCH and SNIFF! :( DIVINE gives her all. Too bad the script was all over the place. (Polyester) Still there are some pretty hilarious moments.

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4 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I had no idea this was on until I was switching channels late that night. I stayed up until the wee hours watching this and Lust in the Dust (which I think is funnier and more entertaining. Also Tab had a better role! He was wasted in Polyester)  When I saw Polyester it was a revival so didnt get to experience the SCRATCH and SNIFF! :( DIVINE gives her all. Too bad the script was all over the place. (Polyester) Still there are some pretty hilarious moments.

yeah, i was struck by how veryvery little TAB HUNTER is in POLYESTER, I don't think he even has any lines until an hour into it. (he didn't have many lines in LUST IN THE DUST, but he had more presence.)

POLYESTER can't quite decide what it really wants to be about, (Aaaalfie)....but for some reason this go-round I was especially tickled by THE BALTIMORE FOOT STOMPER SCENES.

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

yeah, i was struck by how veryvery little TAB HUNTER is in POLYESTER, I don't think he even has any lines until an hour into it. (he didn't have many lines in LUST IN THE DUST, but he had more presence.)

POLYESTER can't quite decide what it really wants to be about, (Aaaalfie)....but for some reason this go-round I was especially tickled by THE BALTIMORE FOOT STOMPER SCENES.

Yes. LOL! I laughed at the Marguerite Duras bill at the Drive In theater. Only John Waters would think of a sight gag like that.

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2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

this is another fun scene in POLYESTER that doesn't contribute a thing to the overall plot.

 

Yes, I'd forgotten about that scene. Was she the black actress in that non Divine movie? (I never saw that one) I wonder how Waters managed to get a hold of a bus???

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I just watched THE VERDICT on TCM -On Demand. It was great. Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre were as great as ever in their last film together. I'm not sure it qualifies as a noir since it takes place in the 1890s, but it have many elements of some of the classic film noirs. It kept me guessing as to "who dunnit" all the way. If you haven't seen this film, I highly recommend it. 

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