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It was odd to see All That Jazz only after I'd seen Fosse/Verdon last year. The two previous films I'd seen were Tight Spot and King of Cool, and it was amusing that All That Jazz also had a smarmy telethon host (though I greatly preferred Mississippi Mac of Tight Spot), and after the unfunny scenes of Jerry Lewis in King of Cool, All That Jazz topped it with two unfunny comics, the emcee at the burlesque house (I felt sorry for this guy, whose jokes weren't as bad as the movie wanted us to believe) and the agonizingly unfunny and smugly self-important "cutting edge" comic based on Lenny Bruce and played by Cliff Gorman, who had played Lenny Bruce onstage. Unfortunately, Fosse keeps returning to Gorman's monologue as a structural element of the film. Because I was watching TCM in real time I couldn't use fast forward, but the mute button was frequently employed.

That being said, there are great sections of All That Jazz. The audition and rehearsal scenes are what make the movie worth watching. These scenes are brilliantly conceived, executed, and edited. The other great scene is the dance number to "Everything Old Is New Again" performed for director/choreographer Joe Gideon (Roy Scheider) by girlfriend (Ann Reinking) and daughter (Erzsebet Foldi). Roy Scheider and Leland Palmer as his ex-wife both give superb performances, and I enjoyed all of their scenes. Ann Reinking, who has a strange voice, is an adequate actress (and great dancer) as one of the director's many girlfriends. I recall that the actress who played Reinking in Fosse/Verdon was dinged by some critics for using a strange voice, and other people said no, that was what Ann Reinking sounded like. They were right.

The show-within-a-show's composer, producer, and financial backers are all broadly caricatured. So if Fosse's collaborators wondered what he thought of them, I guess they found out.

I hadn't seen the set Dave Karger used for the intro, with that ugly sofa. Was the color puke-green? Rancid chartreuse? The purple drapes didn't go with the sofa, either.

Edited by King Rat
correction
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On 11/28/2021 at 9:36 PM, rosebette said:

I loved how they show the interior of the house and went on about how if you don't pick up your newspapers and clutter, you're more likely to get destroyed in a nuke explosion.  I wonder if Marie Kondo could include this in one of her programs.

Apparently, not only is cleanliness next to godliness - bad housekeeping is next to communism.

 

I must wonder if there was not a concern in suburbia because of the number of fallout shelters in homes. A poorly maintained house would have a much greater chance of burning and falling in on itself which could block the shelter's exit. Any standing walls and/or roofs would act against radioactive dust settling on the surfaces people would touch or traverse immediately after leaving a shelter.

Secondary fires from litter would be a concern because they could attack structures which withstood the initial blast.

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1 hour ago, King Rat said:

It was odd to see All That Jazz only after I'd seen Fosse/Verdon last year. The two previous films I'd seen were Tight Spot and King of Cool, and it was amusing that All That Jazz also had a smarmy telethon host (though I greatly preferred Mississippi Mac of Tight Spot), and after the unfunny scenes of Jerry Lewis in King of Cool, All That Jazz topped it with two unfunny comics, the emcee at the burlesque house (I felt sorry for this guy, whose jokes weren't as bad as the movie wanted us to believe) and the agonizingly unfunny and smugly self-important "cutting edge" comic based on Lenny Bruce and played by Cliff Gorman, who had played Lenny Bruce onstage. Unfortunately, Fosse keeps returning to Gorman's monologue as a structural element of the film. Because I was watching TCM in real time I couldn't use fast forward, but the mute button was frequently employed.

That being said, there are great sections of All That Jazz. The audition and rehearsal scenes are what make the movie worth watching. These scenes are brilliantly conceived, executed, and edited. The other great scene is the dance number to "Everything Old Is New Again" performed for director/choreographer Joe Gideon (Roy Scheider) by his ex-wife (Leland Palmer) and daughter (Erzsebet Foldi). Roy Scheider and Leland Palmer both give superb performances, and I enjoyed all of their scenes. Ann Reinking, who has a strange voice, is adequate as one of the director's many girlfriends. I recall that the actress who played Reinking in Fosse/Verdon was dinged by some critics for using a strange voice, and other people said no, that was what Ann Reinking sounded like. They were right.

The show-within-a-show's composer, producer, and financial backers are all broadly caricatured. So if Fosse's collaborators wondered what he thought of them, I guess they found out.

I hadn't seen the set Dave Karger used for the intro, with that ugly sofa. Was the color puke-green? Rancid chartreuse? The purple drapes didn't go with the sofa, either.

This is one of our great favorites. It hits not a single sour note. 

It is Ann Reinking as Kate and Erzsebet Foldi as Michelle who do: "Everything Old is New Again" in his apartment. I know this well because I have to wipe the drool from a certain little fuzzy's chin because of his appreciation for the length of Ann Reinking's legs. Leland Palmer is with Erzsebet Foldi and Ann Reinking on: "After You've Gone", "There'll Be Some Changes Made", "Who's Sorry Now?" and "Some of These Days".

I have no personal knowledge but I have read that the audition and rehearsal scenes are exceptionally realistic. There is no question that he knew the scenarios well but it is nice to know that they are not characterizations as the business aspects are.

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14 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yes, I'd forgotten about that scene. Was she the black actress in that non Divine movie? (I never saw that one) I wonder how Waters managed to get a hold of a bus???

Yes, I can’t remember the name of the actress who plays the vigilante gospel singer in POLYESTER, but she sort of plays the lead in DESPERATE LIVING (1977?) Which is by far John Waters’ darkest most unbalanced film, I’ve seen it a couple of times and it’s very unsettling.

( And spoiler, after it seems like her character is going to be the lead, she actually dies about halfway through.)

Also she has a nude love scene with MINK STOLE That has burned itself into my brain.

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14 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I just watched THE VERDICT on TCM -On Demand. It was great. Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre were as great as ever in their last film together. I'm not sure it qualifies as a noir since it takes place in the 1890s, but it have many elements of some of the classic film noirs. It kept me guessing as to "who dunnit" all the way. If you haven't seen this film, I highly recommend it. 

it's got a fun ending too.

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Last night we screened OLD AQUAINTANCE, the 1943 Warner Brothers film starring Bette Davis &  Miriam Hopkins. I love the outrageousness of this movie and couldn't wait for the audience reactions (no one but staff was familiar with it)

It was our most "vocal" film of the season, with whoops, groans, laughter & applause all the way through, making this such fun to see with others. (YAY!)  The writing was snappy & fun, taking it from a soaper melodrama to an enjoyable, if implausible romp. Warner Brothers films of the 40's were just gold-great writing, great acting, fabulous directing (can you IMAGINE wrangling these two?) & photography.

I am a huge Hopkins fan, as well as a Bette fan and loved seeing these two powerhouse actresses together.  The climax when Hopkins' charactor calls Bette's charactor "a Jezebel" made me howl out loud!

I'm only sorry many who are relative newbies to classic film will have a poor impression of Hopkins from this, since she's not really as **** & crazy as her charactor and can be rather nuanced & charming in other performances. 

887ae186ecd03e96ff9ce7af5ea871ab.jpg

Really? Otto censored s-p-a-s-t-i-c? I thought it described erratic gestures...as in a seizure. I can't imagine how that's offensive.

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7 hours ago, King Rat said:

I hadn't seen the set Dave Karger used for the intro, with that ugly sofa. Was the color puke-green? Rancid chartreuse? The purple drapes didn't go with the sofa, either.

I'm not sure if TCM has a combination site/set design overseer, but someone, somewhere sent out an internal memo that THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS TOO MUCH CHARTREUSE...

To wit I say, THE HELL THERE ISN'T AND I WILL FIGHT YOU ON THAT ALL THE WAY TO THE GOD****ED SUPREME COURT IF I HAVE TO.

...and even CLARENCE THOMAS hates CHARTREUSE.

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10 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Last night we screened OLD AQUAINTANCE, the 1943 Warner Brothers film starring Bette Davis &  Miriam Hopkins. I love the outrageousness of this movie and couldn't wait for the audience reactions (no one but staff was familiar with it)

It was our most "vocal" film of the season, with whoops, groans, laughter & applause all the way through, making this such fun to see with others. (YAY!)  The writing was snappy & fun, taking it from a soaper melodrama to an enjoyable, if implausible romp. Warner Brothers films of the 40's were just gold-great writing, great acting, fabulous directing (can you IMAGINE wrangling these two?) & photography.

I am a huge Hopkins fan, as well as a Bette fan and loved seeing these two powerhouse actresses together.  The climax when Hopkins' charactor calls Bette's charactor "a Jezebel" made me howl out loud!

I'm only sorry many who are relative newbies to classic film will have a poor impression of Hopkins from this, since she's not really as **** & crazy as her charactor and can be rather nuanced & charming in other performances. 

887ae186ecd03e96ff9ce7af5ea871ab.jpg

THIS IS SUCH A STRANGE FILM FOR ME.

I am curious if anyone in the modern audience had issues with the way the script passes no judgment on THE COMPLETELY ABSENTEE FATHER (played by JAMES CRAIG if i rightly recall?) it BOTHERS ME SO MUCH that there is no tension caused by his COMPLETE ABANDONMENT OF HIS WIFE AND CHILD, both of whom deserved scenes where they each got to PUT HIM ON BLAST for taking a powder for the last decade and then tell him TO BUST OUT THE CHECKBOOK ASAP AND GET READY TO MAKE SOME BACK PAYMENTS FOR CHILD SUPPORT

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BIG THANKS TO KATIE G FOR ALERTING us to a copy of THE MAN I LOVE (1947) on u-yay ube-tay.

I watched it the other day, it's not a great print, but it's such an old-fashioned film that some scratches and hiss add some charm.

I like to think of this film as belonging to a WARNER BROS ANTHOLOGY SERIES entitled GIANT SHOULDER PAD THEATER.

the experience is not entirely unlike watching football (but more interesting). I half-expected a few scenes to end with IDA THROWING SOME BLOCKS AND TACKLES as the NOTRE DAME VICTORY MARCH starts on the soundtrack....

 

See the source image

 

See the source image

 

See the source image

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13 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Last night we screened OLD AQUAINTANCE, the 1943 Warner Brothers film starring Bette Davis &  Miriam Hopkins. I love the outrageousness of this movie and couldn't wait for the audience reactions (no one but staff was familiar with it)

It was our most "vocal" film of the season, with whoops, groans, laughter & applause all the way through, making this such fun to see with others. (YAY!)  The writing was snappy & fun, taking it from a soaper melodrama to an enjoyable, if implausible romp. Warner Brothers films of the 40's were just gold-great writing, great acting, fabulous directing (can you IMAGINE wrangling these two?) & photography.

I am a huge Hopkins fan, as well as a Bette fan and loved seeing these two powerhouse actresses together.  The climax when Hopkins' charactor calls Bette's charactor "a Jezebel" made me howl out loud!

I'm only sorry many who are relative newbies to classic film will have a poor impression of Hopkins from this, since she's not really as **** & crazy as her charactor and can be rather nuanced & charming in other performances. 

887ae186ecd03e96ff9ce7af5ea871ab.jpg

I SAID CALM DOWN | MLTSHP

The moment they like to talk about. While it looks like Miriam is getting the worst of it here somewhere I read that she let her body go limp when this scene played, making it physically harder for Davis. Conniving wench!

Of course it also helped her get that rag doll look here.

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7 hours ago, SansFin said:

This is one of our great favorites. It hits not a single sour note. 

It is Ann Reinking as Kate and Erzsebet Foldi as Michelle who do: "Everything Old is New Again" in his apartment. I know this well because I have to wipe the drool from a certain little fuzzy's chin because of his appreciation for the length of Ann Reinking's legs. Leland Palmer is with Erzsebet Foldi and Ann Reinking on: "After You've Gone", "There'll Be Some Changes Made", "Who's Sorry Now?" and "Some of These Days".

I have no personal knowledge but I have read that the audition and rehearsal scenes are exceptionally realistic. There is no question that he knew the scenarios well but it is nice to know that they are not characterizations as the business aspects are.

Thanks, Sans. I fixed the error. There are so many great elements in the audition and rehearsal scenes. To choose only one, it's jaw-dropping to see a stage full of hopefuls dancing to "On Broadway," then we see fewer, and fewer, and then only the final group. And yes, there are many great legs on display.

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On 11/21/2021 at 9:50 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

PS- Poor LOUISE FLETCHER, just bless her heart, you know? Like it's her fault she won an Oscar for a role no one wanted in a weak year for women, SOMEONE SHOULD'VE LINED UP SOMETHING LEGIT FOR HER IN TV OR SOMETHING! SO SHE DIDN'T END UP DOING THINGS LIKE THIS.

She was very funny in 1978's The Cheap Detective spoofing Ingrid Bergman in Casablanca, and while Brainstorm from 1983 was a rickety film overshadowed by Natalie Wood's death, Fletcher was very good in it as an ill-fated scientist who passes away from a heart attack halfway through. Her death scene was extremely chilling and effective.

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1 minute ago, CinemaInternational said:

She was very funny in 1978's The Cheap Detective spoofing Ingrid Bergman in Casablanca, and while Brainstorm from 1983 was a rickety film overshadowed by Natalie Wood's death, Fletcher was very good in it as an ill-fated scientist who passes away from a heart attack halfway through. Her death scene was extremely chilling and effective.

I also enjoy her in FLOWERS IN THE ATTIC, fault-riddled film that it is. 

but MAN, she has been in some low rent DUDS, ie GRIZZLY II and MAMA DRACULA. 

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

I also enjoy her in FLOWERS IN THE ATTIC, fault-riddled film that it is. 

but MAN, she has been in some low rent DUDS, ie GRIZZLY II and MAMA DRACULA. 

Sometimes, the Oscar seems to be a curse. While some are able to keep top-flight careers after the win, others have careers that either taper off or go to pieces afterwards.

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Just watched Body Heat (1981). Seen it only once before, on its original release. Although the plot details died in my memory a long time ago, I've never forgotten how the movie made me feel, like no other up until then. Although I loved the movie back then, now I can appreciate its connection to the old noir movies from even farther back. Twist ending was great. My 24 year old self was stunned by Maddy Walkers beauty. My 65 year old self is still stunned. C115EE71-41E9-47AC-8DCD-10ABF44A59D8.thumb.jpeg.2d7e4a9c5e29953fa7d245e90be10655.jpeg

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On 11/20/2021 at 6:19 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Just released, written and directed by Kenneth Branagh

I just saw this the other night -  in a movie theatre,  the first time I've been to one since the pandemic began

Finally read it, several days after promsing to do so!

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9 hours ago, Grumpytoad said:

Just watched Body Heat (1981). 24 year old self was stunned by Maddy Walker[KATHLEEN TURNER]'s beauty. My 65 year old self is still stunned.

I'm 43 and I have been a lifelong solid "5" on The Kinsey Scale (that's the really gay rating, right?) and I recently saw BODY HEAT for the first time and spent a weekend questioning my sexuality thanks to KATHLEEN TURNER'S breasts in this film.

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On 11/30/2021 at 7:15 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Yes, I can’t remember the name of the actress who plays the vigilante gospel singer in POLYESTER, but she sort of plays the lead in DESPERATE LIVING (1977?) Which is by far John Waters’ darkest most unbalanced film, I’ve seen it a couple of times and it’s very unsettling.

( And spoiler, after it seems like her character is going to be the lead, she actually dies about halfway through.)

Also she has a nude love scene with MINK STOLE That has burned itself into my brain.

Thanks for that visual! LOL. For some reason I can never remember the title of that one. 

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15 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Sometimes, the Oscar seems to be a curse. While some are able to keep top-flight careers after the win, others have careers that either taper off or go to pieces afterwards.

That reminds me...I have to go light a prayer candle for KIM BASINGER.

(I just hope she's well.)

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8 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Thanks for that visual! LOL. For some reason I can never remember the title of that one. [DESPERATE LIVING]

It has a great opening scene, but it loses all focus and goes downhill fast and the SETS get OUTLANDISHLY CHEAP AND SMUTTY AND DARK, it's like a GRADE SCHOOL PLAY IN HELL...I kinda think maybe the lead actress (the black maid GRISELDA) quit because she exits the film so strangely 2/3 into it.

Here is part of the opening, FYI, the whole film is actually on youtube, but really, it's one i recommend only for YOU JOHN WATERS COMPLETISTS/ SICK F***S out there. (of which, I am both.)

UNBELIEVABLY NSFW BTW

EDIT- OMG, THIS CLIP IS LIKE WATCHING MYSELF

 

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On 11/30/2021 at 8:57 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

BIG THANKS TO KATIE G FOR ALERTING us to a copy of THE MAN I LOVE (1947) on u-yay ube-tay.

I watched it the other day, it's not a great print, but it's such an old-fashioned film that some scratches and hiss add some charm.

I like to think of this film as belonging to a WARNER BROS ANTHOLOGY SERIES entitled GIANT SHOULDER PAD THEATER.

the experience is not entirely unlike watching football (but more interesting). I half-expected a few scenes to end with IDA THROWING SOME BLOCKS AND TACKLES as the NOTRE DAME VICTORY MARCH starts on the soundtrack....

 

See the source image

 

See the source image

 

See the source image

I thought the top picture was Judy Garland at first.  How could I have missed how much they look alike?

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

It has a great opening scene, but it loses all focus and goes downhill fast and the SETS get OUTLANDISHLY CHEAP AND SMUTTY AND DARK, it's like a GRADE SCHOOL PLAY IN HELL...I kinda think maybe the lead actress (the black maid GRISELDA) quit because she exits the film so strangely 2/3 into it.

Here is part of the opening, FYI, the whole film is actually on youtube, but really, it's one i recommend only for YOU JOHN WATERS COMPLETISTS/ SICK F***S out there. (of which, I am both.)

UNBELIEVABLY NSFW BTW

EDIT- OMG, THIS CLIP IS LIKE WATCHING MYSELF

 

Sorry, I don't want to watch it in case I see it someday! (LOL). Can't believe it's on Youtube!

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