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I just followed the trail to Youtube for, "The Man I love."  Thanks, you all, I wouldn't have wanted to miss it.

I like Ida Lupino in almost everything, but here she played a character who reminded me of her great role in "High Sierra," so I really liked it.

Nobody plays, "woman in love with  man who loves someone else," like Ida. 

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12 minutes ago, AndreaDoria said:

I just followed the trail to Youtube for, "The Man I love."  Thanks, you all, I wouldn't have wanted to miss it.

I like Ida Lupino in almost everything, but here she played a character who reminded me of her great role in "High Sierra," so I really liked it.

Nobody plays, "woman in love with  man who loves someone else," like Ida. 

everytime i watch IDA LUPINO in anything, I always remember that she was, in fact, very British- if I recall correctly, she lived in ENGLAND until she was 17 or 18 and came to America to audition for the ill-fated 1933 ALICE IN WONDERLAND. Her whole family were BRITISH STAGE ACTORS, and she's very convincingly American in her later parts, but the combination/hybrid of the accents is so distinct and unusual, sort of like a TRANSATLANTIC/BRITISH AUCTIONEER WHO'S LIVED IN BROOKLYN FOR A FEW MONTHS.

...also, I think there is a hint of exaggeration (deliberate and loving) in her interpretation of what an AMERICAN WOMAN of the time was like.

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'm 43 and I have been a lifelong solid "5" on The Kinsey Scale (that's the really gay rating, right?) and I recently saw BODY HEAT for the first time and spent a weekend questioning my sexuality thanks to KATHLEEN TURNER'S breasts in this film.

They were absolutely lovely. Also her voice, hair, the dresses that so flattered her figure type...... 

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'm 43 and I have been a lifelong solid "5" on The Kinsey Scale (that's the really gay rating, right?) and I recently saw BODY HEAT for the first time and spent a weekend questioning my sexuality thanks to KATHLEEN TURNER'S breasts in this film.

Kathleen Turner singlehandedly caused a kid to go through puberty in one minute, in The Man With Two Brains (1983)...This, by comparison, is nothing.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

Kathleen Turner singlehandedly caused a kid to go through puberty in one minute, in The Man With Two Brains (1983)...This, by comparison, is nothing.

I keep meaning to look this one up, I’ve *never* seen it. But I do recall hearing about it on the playground at school.

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@LORNA:  In regards to Ida Lupino I remember years ago reading she was born in 1914 . . . now every source I've read in the recent past has her birthday being 1918.  So she would've been 15 when she journeyed to America in '33.  And she would've been 16 when she appeared in SEARCH FOR BEAUTY (1934).  

Fast forward to 1975 when Ida appeared in "The Devil's Rain" and she looked 65 not 56/57.   Must've been the cigarettes.  Decades of smoking usually makes a person look older.    

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15 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@LORNA:  In regards to Ida Lupino I remember years ago reading she was born in 1914 . . . now every source I've read in the recent past has her birthday being 1918.  So she would've been 15 when she journeyed to America in '33.  And she would've been 16 when she appeared in SEARCH FOR BEAUTY (1934).  

Fast forward to 1975 when Ida appeared in "The Devil's Rain" and she looked 65 not 56/57.   Must've been the cigarettes.  Decades of smoking usually makes a person look older.    

Yea,  but she looks OK to me here!   

Ida Lupino WWII Pin Up and Movie Actress

 

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13 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'm 43 and I have been a lifelong solid "5" on The Kinsey Scale (that's the really gay rating, right?) and I recently saw BODY HEAT for the first time and spent a weekend questioning my sexuality thanks to KATHLEEN TURNER'S breasts in this film.

Lorna, for some reason the Kinsey scale goes from 1 to 6, and I believe that 6 is the gayest one.

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Not Wanted  (1949)  Directed by Ida Lupino,  Elmer Clifton     1 hr 31 min.

Starring:  Ida's look-alike Sally Forrest, Keefe Brasselle, Leo Penn

 

Synopsis: After running away to follow a musician, a young woman is abandoned by him and then finds herself pregnant.

This film about unwed pregnancy was the first from Ida's production company The Filmakers, formed in partnership with her husband Collier Young.  Ida walked away from a lucrative studio contract to write, produce and direct small budgeted films that other studios wouldn't touch, featuring real-life issues that people faced every day. She became disenchanted with the superficiality of acting.

Not Wanted was more documentary in style than other films of the era. Costing a total of $150,000. it earned ten times that amount at the box office and served as a template of sorts for her next few films that dealt with subjects like polio and rape. The overriding message was "You are not alone".

 

*Sadly it was Ida who was all alone in her later years, having grown eccentric, drinking, and living alone in a dilapidated mansion like Norma Desmond in Sunset Blvd. Ida's pool was filled with green sludge and lawn furniture. Some joked that Howard Duff might be at the bottom.  Because she owed Beverly Hills Disposal Service $2300, trash bags piled up all over.  Conditions escalated and she was overwhelmed, with little money and no one to help until a friend stepped up in the 70's and turned things around. 

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10 hours ago, King Rat said:

Lorna, for some reason the Kinsey scale goes from 1 to 6, and I believe that 6 is the gayest one.

SEE, THIS IS WHY I LOVE THIS SITE. Even when I don't mean to, I learn new things.

6 though? That seems so arbitrary for rankings. I kinda wonder if maybe ALFRED settled on a 1-5 scale, but then had an interview with a YOUNG RIP TAYLOR that made him designate an extra-special rating for certain individuals as he dusted all the glitter off his suit. 

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12 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

@LORNA:  In regards to Ida Lupino Fast forward to 1975 when Ida appeared in "The Devil's Rain" and she looked 65 not 56/57.   Must've been the cigarettes.  Decades of smoking usually makes a person look older.    

I think the gallons of booze might have played a part as well.

ps- THE DEVILS RAIN is a masterpiece compared to FOOD OF THE GODS.

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11 hours ago, King Rat said:

Lorna, for some reason the Kinsey scale goes from 1 to 6, and I believe that 6 is the gayest one.

Agreed- it took me six tries to realize every boy I'd been dating in school was gay.

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Wicked As They Come (1956)

To honour the late Arlene Dahl I made a point of viewing this little British drama I had recorded off TCM years ago but never got around to viewing until now. I'm glad I finally saw it.

Dahl plays a poor working class Bostonian, living with a step father she can't stand, who decides to strike out on her own by using her beauty to lure wealthy men (increasingly much older) into lavishing her with gifts as she eventually abandons them to move on to the next one. Eventually, of course, she will receive a comeuppance but it's fun watching the lady exploit the gullibility of various men along her climb to a luxurious top of British and French society.

It's a little disconcerting at the beginning, though, as well as difficult to believe when you view the film's early scenes of her run down American home life. This is due to Dahl being surrounded by British actors who are supposed to be Americans. I mean it's Sidney James playing her American step father!  Sidney James, for gosh sakes, as a Yank! They couldn't find a few cheap rent American actors for these roles?

But soon Dahl is on her way to London, a prize from winning a beauty contest (rigged in her favour by a male admirer hoping for a relationship - silly old man). On the plane over she will encounter advertising salesman Phil Carey who will observe her progression through various men and develop a love/hate attitude towards her. I found Carey's persistent popping up around Dahl all the time had a bit of a creepy vibe, at least in the first half of the film. I mean, take a look at him in that photo below. He acts like that a lot. He looks like he can't wait to get her clothes off to cover her with tomato sauce.

Wicked as They Come (1956)

Carey's boss is played by Herbert Marshall (looking rather haggard, I thought), upon whom Arlene soon sets her sights (after all, he has more money than Carey). Doffing her clothes and hopping into a bed beside a drunken Marshall, who is more than a little surprised to see her smiling beside him when he awakes the following morning, gets a new relationship going for her, along with another step up her ambitious corporate ladder.

And so it goes.

Dahl is strikingly beautiful, of course, even with this film's black and white photography, and seems to be having a fun time playing a "bad girl." Actually I don't think her character is ever actually wicked, in the Biblical sense. She's more manipulative and scheming, and there will be some dime store psychology towards the end to give her character some sympathy in an explanation for her man hating activities.

Wicked As They Come is a minor but fun little drama, and probably one of Arlene Dahl's better show case roles. At least this time she is not mere window dressing. She is the central character in a film whose story revolves around her beauty, with she taking advantage of it at the expense of a series of men who want to possess her. Perfect casting for the actress, actually.

Wicked as They Come (1956)

2.5 out of 4

 

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From the week so far:

Tight Spot (1955) I find myself agreeing with whatever Eddie says about the films on Noir Alley- he's hard to argue against.  I thought the ending was a bit cheesy but otherwise i found it 'meh' with a few good lines.

To Live and Die in LA (1985) I found it very cheesy at the beginning and then, despite the horribly dated soundtrack, began to love this film.  Great chase scene.  Some obvious elements that Tarantino would steal for Pulp Fiction.  Some good lines and also some missed opportunities with some obvious ones. Think i count 3 close-up forehead kill shots and two groin shots.  Ending took me by surprise.  A few things i didn't quite understand such as the bungee jumping off of a bridge at the start and a few mentions of it throughout the film to not have it come back into the story- and what kind of bungee was that?  Pretty damn good.  I'll be recommending this to friends of mine who can stomach it.

Scarlet Street (1945) So-so noir which is mostly notable to me for Edward G. Robinson's nice guy performance- or as nice as he can be.

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On 11/30/2021 at 8:49 PM, Grumpytoad said:

Just watched Body Heat (1981). Seen it only once before, on its original release. Although the plot details died in my memory a long time ago, I've never forgotten how the movie made me feel, like no other up until then. Although I loved the movie back then, now I can appreciate its connection to the old noir movies from even farther back. Twist ending was great. My 24 year old self was stunned by Maddy Walkers beauty. My 65 year old self is still stunned. C115EE71-41E9-47AC-8DCD-10ABF44A59D8.thumb.jpeg.2d7e4a9c5e29953fa7d245e90be10655.jpeg

BODY HEAT might be my favorite Neo-Noir. It's perfect.

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Private Hell 36 (1954)
 

Directed by Don Siegel on a small budget this fairly hard boiled noirish tale about police corruption works well thanks to efficient direction, excellent performances by its cast and some highlight black and white photography of the big city at night.

Steve Cochran and Howard Duff play L.A. robbery investigation partners on the trail of a counterfeiter. Their investigation leads them to Ida Lupino, working in a small lounge as a singer, in their hopes to catch the criminals involved, whose crimes include murder. Cochran picks up with Lupino, who has ambitions of breaking out of the small time and hopes for a man with money to enter her life. Cochran is crazy about Ida but realizes his cop's pay won't be enough to satisfy her.

Co written by Lupino and her former producer husband Collier Young, any slightly slow stretches in this drama, which becomes increasingly tense towards the end, are kept to a minimum. There's a slightly sleazy quality to the courtship scenes between Lupino and Cochran, as opposed to the more conventional wholesome family life of Duff (a blonde Dorothy Malone plays his wife who worries about him). Dean Jagger is fine as the police squad captain who starts to become suspicious about some missing money.

Lupino and Cochran are a pair of performers who never disappoint me. Ida, in her mid 30s when this film was made, looks good in her low cut lounge dress and for those who recall with pleasure her torch singing in The Man I Love and Road House, they will enjoy seeing her back at it again in this film, singing "Didn't You Know?" as she "plays" a piano.

Cochran exudes his usual masculine appeal while delivering a completely convincing performance as a cop who starts off honest enough but increasingly turns rogue as the film proceeds. And even the normally rather stolid Howard Duff is good here, particularly in the film's second half when his aggravation over turning dishonest because of his partner has him in increasing conflict with that partner.

Lupino and Collier were already divorced when this film was made and apparently there was some conflict during the film's production which was one of the last films produced for an independent production company The Filmmakers. It had earlier released, among other films, Lupino's most acclaimed directorial effort, The Hitch Hiker. Private Hell 36's limited budget has some scenes shot in real L.A. locations, including bars, giving the film a greater sense of authenticity.

Private Hell 36 is a good, if minor, noir, which will be of interest to fans of Siegel, as well as Lupino and Cochran. There's a good print of this film currently available on You Tube. I don't think many noir fans will be disappointed by it.

Private Hell 36 (1954) - IMDb

3 out of 4

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On 11/27/2021 at 11:09 AM, Katie_G said:

The_man_I_lovesmall.jpg...  1947     Directed by Raoul Walsh    1h 36m

Ida Lupino, Robert Alda, Martha Vickers, Bruce Bennett, Alan Hale

 

Someday he'll come along, The man I love
And he'll be big and strong, The man I love 
And when he comes my way, I'll do my best to make him stay..

 

The Gershwin title song is prominently featured throughout the film, along with a few other nice tunes. It's not a musical, but it has more music than most non-musicals. It's different, I liked it a lot. 

The plot is, well, not as important as the atmosphere, jazzy vibe, and snappy dialogue. Ida plays another chanteuse, who moves back to LA from New York to be with her extended family.  She's hired immediately by Alda, a slick, mobbed-up nightclub owner.  Her singing is dubbed but she's fabulous and looks like a million bucks in her gorgeous gowns.  They fit her so tightly that she fainted during filming and the dress had to be cut off.

The man she loves is a handsome but troubled pianist (Bennett) who can't get over his ex-wife, Mildred Pierce.  Just kidding, but if he looks familiar that's why.   Oh, my favorite part was seeing Ida knock a gun out of a guy's hand and slap his face six times in rapid succession.  She was awesome. 

"Well, well, the people you run into when you aren't carrying a gun."

full movie

 

 

Great film. I watched Road House afterward. Had myself a nice little Ida Lupino double feature today. Thanks for the heads up.

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On 12/1/2021 at 8:58 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'm 43 and I have been a lifelong solid "5" on The Kinsey Scale (that's the really gay rating, right?) and I recently saw BODY HEAT for the first time and spent a weekend questioning my sexuality thanks to KATHLEEN TURNER'S breasts in this film.

Speaking of Kathleen Turner, a brief article about her appeared in the most recent edition of The New Yorker . Here it is.

Quote

Kathleen Turner has one of the most recognizable voices in show business: deep, booming, gallivanting between American and British pronunciations, raspy as a cheese grater. When it comes to singing, her stentorian timbre technically makes her a baritone. “By the time I got to high school,” she said one recent Tuesday afternoon, holding court at a back table at Joe Allen, in the theatre district, “the musical director put me in with the boys, which was fantastic.” The sixty-seven-year-old actress had ventured to midtown—begrudgingly—from her roost in Tribeca to grab lunch before heading to Town Hall, where, on December 16th, she will put on a one-night-only command performance of her cabaret act, “Finding My Voice.” In the show, Turner croons such standards as “I’d Rather Be Sailing” and “Sweet Kentucky Ham,” and recounts bawdy, behind-the-scrim stories from a life on the stage. Sometimes she’ll even throw in a curse word—or ten.

Turner—who was in head-to-toe black, including New Balance sneakers—is the sort of woman who dresses simply but accessorizes with decadent bling. Her milky-blue jade ring and gleaming earrings were the work of the jewelry designer Helen Woodhull, who died in 2005. “I collect her,” Turner said. “For three of my Broadway plays—‘Cat on a Hot Tin Roof’ and ‘Indiscretions’ and ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’—we designed pins for the original cast. And then we’d break the mold so no one else could ever have it again. That was when I was rich.”

 

Turner poked at her chopped salad. “The most reliable thing here is the burger,” she said. “But, well, you know.” As she was about to try another forkful, the actor Reed Birney, also sixty-seven, with a downy puff of silver hair, swanned over. “Kathleen!” he cried. “How are you?”

“Reed and I did our first Broadway show together,” Turner said, extending her hand.

“We did ‘Gemini’ together, playing brother and sister,” Birney said.

“1978,” Turner added.

 

“We’re still here,” Birney said.

“We’re still here, honey,” Turner said. “Still workin’. We did good.”

As she prepared to leave for the theatre, for a walk-through to check lighting, she reflected on several things that annoy her: when a movie star like Meryl Streep steps into a stage actor’s signature part for a film (“I think Meryl’s great, but I do mind that she takes roles,” she said of Streep’s film “Doubt.” “Cherry Jones should have had that film”), young agents (“I flew out to L.A. and sat in a room full of twentysomethings telling me how wonderful I am, and one guy says, ‘By the way, what have you done?’ ”), and people who try to butt into her act (“One night when we were at the Carlyle, this guy in the audience started singing right along with me. The next one was coming up, and I said, ‘Excuse me, sir, do you know this one?’ He went, ‘No.’ And I went . . . ‘Good ’ ”).

A person who does not annoy Turner: her hairdresser of forty-some years, Joseph Piazza. “He now lives in New Jersey, so I take the ferry to see him,” she said. Piazza is the reason she started singing professionally. He also cuts the hair of her director, Andy Gale. A few years back, Piazza and Gale discussed Gale’s collaborating with Turner on a musical project. “I happen to have perfect pitch,” Turner said.

At Town Hall, Turner joined Gale, a compact man in gray chinos with a short white beard and wire-framed glasses. “How do we get onstage?” she bellowed, eventually finding her way. As the two stood on the edge of the stage, Gale said, “This place was built in 1921 by suffragists, and Margaret Sanger was on this stage at the beginning of what became Planned Parenthood.” He explained that the suffragists had wanted no box seats.

“If women ran the world, I swear to God it would be better,” Turner said.

Gale said, “You’re running this!”

Turner didn’t care for the positioning of the spotlight. “It’s a very severe angle,” she said. “I wonder if we could put a spot down the center?” She moved around, marking out the positions of the grand piano, the bass player, and her guitarist. On the night of the show, she will wear a “midnight-blue tunic and flowing pants” (she had first asked her designer for “heavy, heavy silk pajamas”) and sing near a vase of red roses.

“It’s really a classy show,” Gale said.

 

The roses, Turner said, are a nod to one of her most beloved traditions. “When you open in a show, your dressing room looks like a funeral parlor,” she said. “So many bouquets. By two weeks, they’re all dead. I like having roses. Always. So every week I have a standing order for two dozen roses for my dressing room. Because I have seen no reason to wait for someone to give me some.” ♦

 

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On 12/1/2021 at 9:00 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

That reminds me...I have to go light a prayer candle for KIM BASINGER.

(I just hope she's well.)

Yeah, I always thought she was a bit underrated even after that win for LA Confidential (which she was very touching in).  She had good comic chops, as seen in the two films she did for Blake Edwards (The Man Who Loved Women and Blind Date), she could play a good femme fatale (The Natural and Final Analysis), and she could provide the only human notes in an empty blockbuster (Batman). Last I saw her was in 2016's The Nice Guys, a 70s set suspense comedy where she played another shady woman , caught up in a lurid case involving pornography, the mob, and General Motors. (it was a very R-rated film...... lots of language, violence, and nudity, even if the best gag in the film was one that could be accounted without embarrassing details; the mob hitman in the film was code-named "John-Boy" like the original main character on The Waltons, and when he turned up, he was a dead ringer for Richard Thomas, right down to the mole on the side of the face)

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2 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Yeah, I always thought she was a bit underrated even after that win for LA Confidential (which she was very touching in).  She had good comic chops, as seen in the two films she did for Blake Edwards (The Man Who Loved Women and Blind Date), she could play a good femme fatale (The Natural and Final Analysis), and she could provide the only human notes in an empty blockbuster (Batman). Last I saw her was in 2016's The Nice Guys, a 70s set suspense comedy where she played another shady woman , caught up in a lurid case involving pornography, the mob, and General Motors. (it was a very R-rated film...... lots of language, violence, and nudity, even if the best gag in the film was one that could be accounted without embarrassing details; the mob hitman in the film was code-named "John-Boy" like the original main character on The Waltons, and when he turned up, he was a dead ringer for Richard Thomas, right down to the mole on the side of the face)

I met her (in a record store!) right after LA CONFIDENTIAL came out and I told her she was going to win the Oscar for LA CONFIDENTIAL and that I was really proud of her and always knew she could do it. 
 

(and she was REALLY NICE. )

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On 11/29/2021 at 6:11 PM, Hoganman1 said:

I just watched THE VERDICT on TCM -On Demand. It was great. Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre were as great as ever in their last film together. I'm not sure it qualifies as a noir since it takes place in the 1890s, but it have many elements of some of the classic film noirs. It kept me guessing as to "who dunnit" all the way. If you haven't seen this film, I highly recommend it. 

Gaslight, The Lodger, House By The River, and Hanover Square are set around the 1890s/turn of the century,  and we got Western Noirs Blood On The Moon, Pursued, The Furies and others (latter 1800s), and The Tall Target taking place around Lincoln's inauguration 1860, and even earlier The Black Book during the French Revolution. 

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54 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Gaslight, The Lodger, House By The River, and Hanover Square are set around the 1890s/turn of the century,  and we got Western Noirs Blood On The Moon, Pursued, The Furies and others (latter 1800s), and The Tall Target taking place around Lincoln's inauguration 1860, and even earlier The Black Book during the French Revolution. 

So I guess you're saying that "noir" applies to when the movie was made; not  necessarily when it takes place.  I can agree with that. I'm almost always on the same page with you, Cigar Joe. 

Frankly, I've learned a lot from most of you on this forum in the last few years. When I first found the forum, my definition of "film noir " was pretty narrow.  The film had to be black and white . It had to have been made in the 40s or very early 50s. There had to be a femme fatale, a seedy detective,  a cop or insurance investigator.  There had to be shadows  and dark rooms.  You guys and gals have expanded my perspective and that's why I love this forum.

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4 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

So I guess you're saying that "noir" applies to when the movie was made; not  necessarily when it takes place.  I can agree with that. I'm almost always on the same page with you, Cigar Joe. 

What I saying is Noir is a dark pan-generic story coupled with a Visual Style with enough of those elements to tip a film Noir for you the individual viewer. That's why besides Crime Noir, there are  also some Noir Westerns, Noir Dramas, Noir SciFi, Noir Horror, Noir Thriller, Bio Noir, War Noir, Suspense Noir, Adventure Noir, Experimental Noir, and Noir Exploitation.

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1 minute ago, cigarjoe said:

What I saying is Noir is a dark pan-generic story coupled with a Visual Style with enough of those elements to tip a film Noir for you the individual viewer. That's why besides Crime Noir, there are  also some Noir Westerns, Noir Dramas, Noir SciFi, Noir Horror, Noir Thriller, Bio Noir, War Noir, Suspense Noir, Adventure Noir, Experimental Noir, and Noir Exploitation.

Thanks. Please see my edit.

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13 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

Thanks. Please see my edit.

The main reason that in the US most Noir were Crime Noir was because The Motion Picture Production Code and the Legion of Decency would not allow morally questionable or taboo subjects.  So basically we had a violence guardrail on one side and a sex and taboo story guardrail on the other.

 

 

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