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The_Devil's_Hand.jpg...1961   Stars Linda Christian, Robert Alda...  Horror ... 1 hr. 10 min.

Ever meet an incredibly hot person and before you can say "Holy ****, that doll looks just like my fiance!" you're waist deep in a Satanic cult with a witch who's involved with human sacrifice?  I hate it when that happens.   Alda plays Rick, and like Guy in Rosemary's Baby, is also finding it tough to break it off even when his fiance's doll is ice-picked to the wall and she's conveniently hospitalized with a mysterious ailment.

"Your fiance can only stay a few minutes.  You're not to get excited."
"But nurse, I always get excited when I see Rick!"
"Well, I don't blame you, he's quite a man."

Why can't TCM Underground show films like this instead of repeats about the dangers of mixing drugs and earth-moving equipment?

 

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53 minutes ago, Katie_G said:

The_Devil's_Hand.jpg...1961   Stars Linda Christian, Robert Alda...  Horror ... 1 hr. 10 min.

Ever meet an incredibly hot person and before you can say "Holy ****, that doll looks just like my fiance!" you're waist deep in a Satanic cult with a witch who's involved with human sacrifice?  I hate it when that happens.   Alda plays Rick, and like Guy in Rosemary's Baby, is also finding it tough to break it off even when his fiance's doll is ice-picked to the wall and she's conveniently hospitalized with a mysterious ailment.

"Your fiance can only stay a few minutes.  You're not to get excited."
"But nurse, I always get excited when I see Rick!"
"Well, I don't blame you, he's quite a man."

Why can't TCM Underground show films like this instead of repeats about the dangers of mixing drugs and earth-moving equipment?

 

Plus Mexican movie star Ariadne Welter, sister of Linda Christian, and Neil Hamilton, Commissioner Gordon in the Batman TV series. My kinda movie.

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image.jpeg.1551f30a0e918a6500b12506ad28e492.jpeg

Watership Down (1978) TCM On Demand 7/10

A colony of rabbits search for a new home when their country side is threatened.

I saw part of this years ago but this is the first time I saw it all the way through. It's an animated version of a book by Richard Adams. The hand drawn animation looks very good. John Hurt voices one of the main rabbit characters, his scratchy, weary voice works well. Other voices are provided by Richard Briers (from the British sitcom The Good Neighbors) , Denholm Elliott and Sir Ralph Richardson. Zero Mostel is the voice of a bird, though it is hard to understand what he is saying since he trying to use a German or maybe Russian (?) accent. The film has a very somber and sometimes grim tone, which I kind of liked, very unlike Disney. It has a few violent scenes which are quite shocking for a cartoon. And Art Garfunkel can be heard singing the song "Bright Eyes" a beautiful tune and probably his best solo hit.

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

image.jpeg.1551f30a0e918a6500b12506ad28e492.jpeg

Watership Down (1978) TCM On Demand 7/10

A colony of rabbits search for a new home when their country side is threatened.

I saw part of this years ago but this is the first time I saw it all the way through. It's an animated version of a book by Richard Adams. The hand drawn animation looks very good. John Hurt voices one of the main rabbit characters, his scratchy, weary voice works well. Other voices are provided by Richard Briers (from the British sitcom The Good Neighbors) , Denholm Elliott and Sir Ralph Richardson. Zero Mostel is the voice of a bird, though it is hard to understand what he is saying since he trying to use a German or maybe Russian (?) accent. The film has a very somber and sometimes grim tone, which I kind of liked, very unlike Disney. It has a few violent scenes which are quite shocking for a cartoon. And Art Garfunkel can be heard singing the song "Bright Eyes" a beautiful tune and probably his best solo hit.

I saw that once when I was about 7. It went way over my head.....

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Two great Yiddish films were shown on TCM last night. I only watched a bit of  The Dybbuk. it's a wonderful film, which I've seen before. A Jewish ghost story, filmed in Poland in 1937, it's one of the great stories. The dance scene is eerie and sad, since one wonders how many of these actors survived, though some did emigrate to New York and elsewhere. I'm sorry I didn't record the film. I did record Tevye, which followed, and which features the great Yiddish actor Maurice Schwartz in the title role. Tevye was filmed in New York, where Schwartz founded the Yiddish Art Theatre. Tevye was the first non-English language film selected for the National Film Registry.

Here's the dance scene from The Dybbuk, the dance of the dead.

 

Tevya_(1939_film_poster).jpg

 

 

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19 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The film has a very somber and sometimes grim tone, which I kind of liked, very unlike Disney. It has a few violent scenes which are quite shocking for a cartoon.

And that is why I have never seen this film. I am a "bunny person" and the idea of seeing any harm, anything tragic happen to a rabbit would haunt me forever. Does the violence happen to a bunny? Fatal? Gory? Scary? I hate to ask for spoilers, but it would help greatly if I knew more detail. Does the story end well at least?

Last night I watched the 1950 film, CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN. I had never seen this before because similarly to LIFE WITH FATHER, I'm not particularly enamored by period pieces or movies featuring dominant fathers. Also wasn't crazy about either lead Myrna Loy and Clifton Webb, but as I've gotten older have gained greater appreciation for both.

The movie was pretty OK, nothing really special. I did like some of the quaint period visuals of the story like the car,  bathing suits and home life. The acting was superb by all (tough with so many kiddies) and the photography, sets, costumes & script were all excellent. I enjoyed Clifton Webb as a fussy demanding Dad, the role fit him like a glove.  I've actually come to enjoy all of his performances, although find them a bit one note. I did bristle seeing him kiss Loy (on the cheek) and wonder how he managed that-must have pretended she was his Mother, haha.

But I really enjoyed Myrna Loy in this. It was great to see her in COLOR and she slid into this matronly role perfectly-still beautiful & elegant, but wisely left the glamour out.  She certainly couldn't look like a beauty contestant as a Mother of 12 and the make up people did a nice job of keeping her appearance "natural". I don't know who the support staff was, the opening was more concerned with the animation than the credits.

I thought the movie had an abrupt ending & had to rewind it to make sure I hadn't missed anything. Amazingly, this story is based on an autobiographic book by the eldest son.

Cheaper_by_the_dozen_film_poster.jpg

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57 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

And that is why I have never seen this film. I am a "bunny person" and the idea of seeing any harm, anything tragic happen to a rabbit would haunt me forever. Does the violence happen to a bunny? Fatal? Gory? Scary? I hate to ask for spoilers, but it would help greatly if I knew more detail. Does the story end well at least?

Last night I watched the 1950 film, CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN. I had never seen this before because similarly to LIFE WITH FATHER, I'm not particularly enamored by period pieces or movies featuring dominant fathers. Also wasn't crazy about either lead Myrna Loy and Clifton Webb, but as I've gotten older have gained greater appreciation for both.

The movie was pretty OK, nothing really special. I did like some of the quaint period visuals of the story like the car,  bathing suits and home life. The acting was superb by all (tough with so many kiddies) and the photography, sets, costumes & script were all excellent. I enjoyed Clifton Webb as a fussy demanding Dad, the role fit him like a glove.  I've actually come to enjoy all of his performances, although find them a bit one note. I did bristle seeing him kiss Loy (on the cheek) and wonder how he managed that-must have pretended she was his Mother, haha.

But I really enjoyed Myrna Loy in this. It was great to see her in COLOR and she slid into this matronly role perfectly-still beautiful & elegant, but wisely left the glamour out.  She certainly couldn't look like a beauty contestant as a Mother of 12 and the make up people did a nice job of keeping her appearance "natural". I don't know who the support staff was, the opening was more concerned with the animation than the credits.

I thought the movie had an abrupt ending & had to rewind it to make sure I hadn't missed anything. Amazingly, this story is based on an autobiographic book by the eldest son.

Cheaper_by_the_dozen_film_poster.jpg

There is a sequel to "Cheaper By The Dozen".  It's called "Bells On Their Toes".  TCM has shown this before, but it's been some time since I've seen it.  The story starts off with the graduation of the youngest child in the family, and the movie continues with flashbacks about the Gilbreath(?) family after their father's death.

And since you mentioned you like movies with 'bunnies' in it and how you hate to see them harmed.  Have you ever seen "Night of the Lepus"?  It ranks right up there with "Frogs" and will really make you think about the kind of pets your children may want to raise!

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Does the violence happen to a bunny? Fatal? Gory? Scary? I hate to ask for spoilers, but it would help greatly if I knew more detail. Does the story end well at least?

Yes to all questions. A dog attacks the rabbits and kills a few. Two rabbits claw each other, quite a bit of blood and wounds are shown. Another rabbit is shown caught in a snare trap.

The ending seems hopeful.

 

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1 hour ago, midwestan said:

And since you mentioned you like movies with 'bunnies' in it and how you hate to see them harmed.  Have you ever seen "Night of the Lepus"?

Haha as a teen I was the only kid who knew the Latin name for rabbits was Lepus. I waited until adulthood before seeing it & LOL when I did. I especially liked the bunnies scary vocalizations while chewing in slow motion. 

I call this the "Cujo Effect": when it's hard to be scared over a comical, goofy looking attacker, "Please, let me lick the yummy red corn syrup off my face!"

cujo.jpg

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6 hours ago, Swithin said:

Two great Yiddish films were shown on TCM last night. I only watched a bit of  The Dybbuk. it's a wonderful film, which I've seen before. A Jewish ghost story, filmed in Poland in 1937, it's one of the great stories. The dance scene is eerie and sad, since one wonders how many of these actors survived, though some did emigrate to New York and elsewhere. I'm sorry I didn't record the film. I did record Tevye, which followed, and which features the great Yiddish actor Maurice Schwartz in the title role. Tevye was filmed in New York, where Schwartz founded the Yiddish Art Theatre. Tevye was the first non-English language film selected for the National Film Registry.

Here's the dance scene from The Dybbuk, the dance of the dead.

 

Tevya_(1939_film_poster).jpg

 

 

I watched both films.  Tevye was very powerful and moved me to tears - I feel as if Fiddler on the Roof sugar-coated some of the issues.  It's hard to believe that Tevye was made for $70,000 and filmed mostly on Long Island.   I thought the outdoor scenes were beautiful.

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Dressed to Kill (1980)

Found this to be laughably bad, but i watched it all the way through because, you know- naked women.  I couldn't believe Angie Dickinson did all these nude scenes and sure enough, wikipedia says a Penthouse Pet of the Year was used as her double.  I just thought the entire story was cheesy as well as the direction.  DePalma says the SPOILER elevator murder scene is one of his best but i don't think that's giving him any credit.  For getting top-billing, i didn't think Michael Caine was featured much.  Supposedly Sean Connery almost got the role and I think that would've been interesting.  Apparently there's revisionist backlash for how transexuals are  portrayed, but i even find that a humorous take because that's like saying Psycho puts the trans community in a bad light.  I'm more surprised the racial stereotypes of the black men on the subway, which is another ridiculous scene.  Everything about this film seems to be over the top.  Nothing here works for me, the story, the characters (the hyper-sexual bored housewife, the nerdy inventor son, the vapid prostitute who is constantly being attacked everywhere she goes but seems to forget the danger she's in anytime she speaks to a new person in front of her, the hard-boiled police detectives who talk rough... but there's still the naked women at least.

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8 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I call this the "Cujo Effect": when it's hard to be scared over a comical, goofy looking attacker, "Please, let me lick the yummy red corn syrup off my face!"

I remember a friend seeing Cujo, and saying that making a killer Bernie look terrifying is like Walter Matthau playing Dracula.

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The Man I Love (1946)

 

Amazing, isn’t it, when you watch a film that you never really even heard of, and find yourself drawn into it right from the beginning.

I discovered a little Warner Brothers gem, The Man I Love, filmed in 1945 and held up almost two years before its eventual release. It’s a difficult film to categorize by genre, part noir (certainly in appearance), part exploration of club life, particularly the jazz scene, part human drama. It was directed by Raoul Walsh in such a smooth, effortless fashion, with his gliding camerawork, that I want to scream out, “Why do people stereotype this man as just an action director?” He could be, on occasions such as this, so much more.

It’s a film about lonely people or, at least, those searching for something in the big city, dissatisfied with their existing lot in life.

The opening scene alone is worth the price of admission, and it’s got to be something of a classic. Two drunks outside a club, attracted to the music inside, are refused entry through the establishment’s locked doors, told that it’s “crazy” people inside having a good time by themselves. Walsh takes us inside and there it is, a smoke filled jazz-tinged session of the Gershwin title tune.

Walsh shows great respect for the jazz musicians performing. As the camera slowly, lovingly explores this group, the director gives a few of them their own brief moment. The sax player with a closeup of his fingers, the coronet player, the drummer, then back to the coronet player, only this time it's a shadowy closeup of his face.

The film’s star, Ida Lupino, then starts to sing The Man I Love off screen. Walsh teases the viewers, letting them hear the song’s opening lyrics before allowing them to have their first sighting of Lupino. Even then she has her back partially to the camera as she casually moves to let us see her in profile, a cigarette in her hand, from which she casually flicks an ash.

No, it’s not Lupino’s voice. She’s dubbed, but the voice sounds right, like it could be hers, and Lupino, beautifully attired in white with '40s style padded shoulders, then gets her first closeup, as a giant cloud of cigarette smoke escapes her mouth. And you can see it in this actress, you can see it in her eyes, that connection with the song that she’s singing (which will also come to represent her character, as it turns out).

“One day he’ll come along, the man I love.

“And he’ll be big and strong, the man I love . . .”

Lupino brings so much feeling to these lyrics with her expression. You’re already ready to believe in her character at this point before you even get to know her. And you see her camaraderie with the musicians, particularly at that moment in the song in which she reaches over to light the pianist’s unlit cigarette with her own.

How I wish George Gershwin could have seen this moment that Lupino, Walsh, cinematographer Sidney Hickok with that great smoky black-and-white photography, and the set designer, in addition to those real musicians playing there, all bring to his song. This three minute song sequence is a loving tribute to Gershwin’s haunting hurting masterpiece.

Even if you don’t care for the rest of the film (which I find impossible to believe) you HAVE to see The Man I Love if only for this opening. All those who love jazz, who appreciate films like Young Man with a Horn or Blues in the Night, will find something to love about this introduction that Walsh gave his film.

There are myriad characters in the film, and I don’t want to bog this brief tribute down by listing them all. Lupino’s character travels from New York City to California to see her family but her character is leaving one bad relationship and now drifting. There’s the sleazy night club owner, well played by Robert Alda, who only has opportunism on his mind, be it with a woman for a night or taking over someone else’s nightclub. Alda's character is fairly despicable, putting the obvious charm on one moment, angrily snapping the next when things are not going his way.

There’s also Bruce Bennett as a jazz pianist who was ripped apart by a divorce, and remains haunted by that relationship. Lupino, also hurting, finds it easy to make a connection with him but he’s reluctant to commit. Walsh does something with Bennett in this film.

Bennett, a big boned former Olympian, who made a career in character support in Hollywood, largely at Warners, will never be on anyone’s list of great actors. But there was always a bit of a hang dog sadness about him, and it works beautifully in this part. You can see the pain in his face as he laments over his lost love from the past. There’s also an essential decency about his character (especially in contrast to the sleazy nightclub owner) by which you can fully understand Lupino being drawn to him and wanting to take a chance. Bennett is quietly wonderful in the part. It has to rank as one of his best performances.

And for a film that is about a collection of people dissatisfied with their lives, an extension of that can be found in this most capable cast, none of whom enjoyed really satisfactory careers in Hollywood. There was Alda, initially playing, ironically, George Gershwin in a high gloss biopic before Warners then cast him in supporting roles, often of a sleazy nature, such as in this film.

Then there was Bruce Bennett, a solid, if somewhat rather dull, supporting player for the most part, though effective on occasion, such as in this film, Treasure of Sierra Madre (as Cody) and when playing Mildred Pierce’s former husband. Then look at the rundown of actresses in this film, all briefly appearing in Warners films before largely disappearing, Dolores Moran, effectively cast as a spoiled brat in The Man I Love who falls in with the nightclub owner, Martha Vickers, best remembered today as Lauren Bacall’s thumb-sucking n y m pho sister in The Big Sleep, and Andrea King, leading lady of The Beast with Five Fingers.

There’s even Lupino. Strong, intense, occasionally even brilliant performer that she was, and briefly viewed as Warner’s chief dramatic studio challenge to Bette Davis, after a strong start the studio seemed to lose interest in her. The Man I Love, released at the end of 1946, would be one of her last effective roles before she would become the only actress I can recall who went behind the camera as director when it was apparent that acting opportunities were no longer coming her way. She was a capable director, more than capable, doing good work on television as well as in the movies, but what a loss it was for all of us that she could no longer find the right roles as an actress.

The Man I Love is not a great film. There is, however, a wistful melancholy about the production, with a moody ambience encompassing its lost characters, that makes it a highly affecting drama. This is a neglected Raoul Walsh melodrama that deserves a look, and then another. If only for that opening scene set in a nightclub late at night. Trust me on this.

And don't be mislead by that poster below. It's sad, hurtin' Bruce Bennett that's the man Lupino loves, not sleazy Alda,

Noirvember 2018, Episode 23: The Man I Love (1946)

 

3 out of 4

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I just watched THE CURSE (1987), a horror film based on THE COLOUR OUT OF SPACE BY HP LOVECRAFT starring Claude Akins (Who I bet *really* wished he had been nicer to Angela Lansbury on first season of MURDER SHE WROTE *numerous* times whilst filming this thing) and  a young Wesley crusher himself, Wil Wheaton.

LOVECRAFT meets HEE HAW, if you will, This movie reminds me in a lot of ways of THE FOOD OF THE GODS In that it’s about a strange mysterious pollutant affecting life on a farm and also in that it is not particularly good.

(Although I readily admit “the curse” is an effing masterpiece compared to “food of the gods”- Which I still say is the worst movie I’ve ever seen, and I’ve seen a lot of absolutely awful films.)

The special effects aren’t too bad, and there’s a couple of interesting gross out moments if you’re into that sort of thing.

 

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Last night I watched a Lubitsch double feature of Cluny Brown and Heaven Can Wait. Each stars one of the most beautiful brunettes of the 40s. A friend once said she could only describe Jennifer Jones in Cluny Brown as "luminous," and that's exactly the right word. Jennifer Jones gives a great comic performance and has never been more beautiful, a truly unusual combination. Cluny, the girl who thinks plumbing is a wonderful hobby, doesn't fit readily into any social class but lights up the room, in case anyone is noticing. She and Charles Boyer, as a Czech refugee professor, have great chemistry. The supporting cast is uniformly strong.

My favorite line (from the butler, regretting Cluny's stint as a housemaid): "I'll never forget the day she dusted the left eye out of Sir Henry's moose."

Heaven Can Wait shows off the Twentieth-Century Fox Technicolor style, with lots and lots of what one might call "Nathalie Kalmus blue," after the Technicolor consultant. This muted color palette fascinates me simply because it so different from what we are used to today. Some scenes have as much muted blue--fashionistas and artists, give me a more precise term!--as 1970s films have Sepia Sludge. The opening scene, the anteroom of hell, is stunningly beautiful (and not featuring muted blue). If I were a TCM host, I'd like a backdrop just like this.

The cast of Heaven Can Wait is strong, but there's the central problem of how to make a film about a Casanova while showing darned little of his pursuit of any woman other than his wife (Gene Tierney, so lovely even a Casanova might decide to stay home). The production code hamstrings the story. The script is too talky and should have been trimmed by about fifteen minutes. We see too little of hell, where Laird Cregar makes a wonderful Satan. Too bad the script doesn't keep returning to Cregar and hell between episodes.

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16 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I just watched THE CURSE (1987), a horror film based on THE COLOUR OUT OF SPACE BY HP LOVECRAFT starring Claude Akins (Who I bet *really* wished he had been nicer to Angela Lansbury on first season of MURDER SHE WROTE *numerous* times whilst filming this thing) and  a young Wesley crusher himself, Wil Wheaton.

LOVECRAFT meets HEE HAW, if you will, This movie reminds me in a lot of ways of THE FOOD OF THE GODS In that it’s about a strange mysterious pollutant affecting life on a farm and also in that it is not particularly good.

(Although I readily admit “the curse” is an effing masterpiece compared to “food of the gods”- Which I still say is the worst movie I’ve ever seen, and I’ve seen a lot of absolutely awful films.)

The special effects aren’t too bad, and there’s a couple of interesting gross out moments if you’re into that sort of thing.

 

The Color Out of Space is also the inspiration for the film Die, Monster, Die! Letitia (played by Freda Jackson), finally coming out of her bedroom, has always seemed to me to be one of the creepiest scenes ever!

ti100892.jpg

 

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On 12/5/2021 at 11:16 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

Watership Down (1978) TCM On Demand 7/10

A colony of rabbits search for a new home when their country side is threatened.

I saw part of this years ago but this is the first time I saw it all the way through. It's an animated version of a book by Richard Adams. The hand drawn animation looks very good. John Hurt voices one of the main rabbit characters, his scratchy, weary voice works well. Other voices are provided by Richard Briers (from the British sitcom The Good Neighbors) , Denholm Elliott and Sir Ralph Richardson. Zero Mostel is the voice of a bird, though it is hard to understand what he is saying since he trying to use a German or maybe Russian (?) accent. The film has a very somber and sometimes grim tone, which I kind of liked, very unlike Disney. It has a few violent scenes which are quite shocking for a cartoon. And Art Garfunkel can be heard singing the song "Bright Eyes" a beautiful tune and probably his best solo hit.

It came out the same month as Ralph Bakshi's animated Lord of the Rings (1978) (which also had John Hurt as a scratchy, battle-hardened Aragorn), and between those and the inferior British indie The Mouse and His Child, it was the three-way last waltz of the late-70's "Disney or Weirdo" phase, when the only feature animation besides Ron Miller-era Disney was weird indie animation from Bakshi, Richard Williams or other minor studios.

The fact that the two big releases were both versions of popular literature briefly raised our hopes for what animation could do in Disney's absence--The glory days of book-based indie animation had a jumpstart in 1982 with The Last Unicorn, The Secret of NIMH and Heidi's Song, but the Watership producers infamously following with another grim and downbeat version of Richard Adams' followup book The Plague Dogs killed that idea.

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Didn't just watch it, but ran out of time before I could post about it   But yesterday's STREET GIRL('29)  was one I'd not heard of or have seen before.  And to me is notable for something I've never seen before, and thought I'd NEVER see----

a SMILE on NED SPARKS' face!  :o   My jaw almost cracked my hardwood floor, it dropped so fast!  ;) 

Otherwise, I didn't think for the times it was all that bad.

Sepiatone

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Last night I watched Man of the World with William Powell and Carole Lombard.     Not much really goes on in this 1933 pre-code.   It wasn't very racy (for a pre-code), but the dynamic acting from Powell was first rate.     This was somewhat "required" since a lot of film was used just showing Powell thinking about his situation.   

This being an early Lombard film, she had yet to develop that sparkle that would make her a major star,  especially in light \ romantic comedies.   She was good, but nothing special.

Still it was nice to see a film I have never seen before that featured two of my favorite actors. 

Man of the World (1931) - IMDb

 

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On 12/9/2021 at 12:48 PM, Sepiatone said:

Didn't just watch it, but ran out of time before I could post about it   But yesterday's STREET GIRL('29)  was one I'd not heard of or have seen before. 

You should see the remake, Four Jacks and a Jill, with Desi Arnaz.

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Full disclosure, I posted the following review in my TCM UNdERGROUND THREAD, but this was a unique film and I thought I'd crosspost it here in case any of you regulars rarely stray from this particular thread...

See the source image

 

you know,

I was going to deem last night's UNDERGROUND DOUBLE FEATURE as "SNOOZEVILLE: POPULATION 2" but I checked out SILENT NIGHT, DEADLY NIGHT (1984) on a lark. It seemed like I'd maybe seen it before, but if I had, I'd somehow forgotten about it.

What a VILE, prurient , DEGENERATE piece of TRASH.

I enjoyed it quite a bit.

I also could not help but GEEK OUT at several of THE TOYS ON DISPLAY in the 1984 TOYSTORE- they had THE JABBA THE HUT PLAYSET (I'm not even a STARWARS fanboy and I Gasped! on seeing it) and a ****ING KRULL BOARDGAME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Also a MISS PIGGY PUPPET, which a lot of us gay kids recall quite fondly.

there was a lot of gratuitous nudity in this movie, I will take the time to tell you all that THE KILLER in SILENT NIGHT, DEADLY NIGHT has the cutest butt in all horror slayerdom- although to be fair, he doesn't have a lot of competition.

as far as I'm concerned, two leitmotifs that are hard to fail in a horror movie are:

1. Santa with an axe

and

2. Nuns

And this movie has both of 'em, although I kinda wish they had caught NIGHT OF THE HUNTER beforehand and tried to do a sort of LILLIAN GISH thing with THE MOTHER SUPERIOR CHARACTER.

 

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