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17 hours ago, TomJH said:

liked to hang out with rough 'n ready stunt man types

Yeeeyeah! Me too!

17 hours ago, TomJH said:

looks even more like a hee honk than usual

LOL Tom, your phrasing is hilarious!

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Sorry about the three posts, but they are distinctly different subjects. THIS one is I just watched....

Peter Bogdanovich's THE GREAT BUSTER from 2018. I had recorded this when it was on TCM just hadn't watched it yet.

The_Great_Buster_poster.jpg

This was an odd documentary in that the first half is a kind of linear story of Buster's personal life from childhood to his death. The second half is a synopsis of his career highlighting the best movies, scenes & stunts. I'm pretty familiar with Keaton's life & films, so there wasn't much new for me to discover. I'm sure for any newbie this movie will inspire seeking out his classics, much easier than my search before the internet/streaming.

My only beef was the plethora of interviews in the first half of filmmakers/performers who sang his praises of how much he "influenced" them. Who cares? I was further offended screen time was devoted to showing CLIPS of these other people's works! In a movie that's supposed to be about KEATON!

Sorry, showing Spiderman's masked face is no comparison to Keaton's deadpan and only comes across as a further insult. C'mon, doesn't Keaton's universally loved & timelessness (meaning classic) kind of point out how trite & stupid the Spiderman movies or TV show Jackass is in comparison? 50 years from now people will still delight discovering Keaton's brilliant work while all those he "influenced" will be wholly forgotten. 

The only interviews that should have been included were those who either had personal stories like Dick Van Dyke or those who could better explain Keaton's work because of their knowledge & success in the field like Quentin Tarantino & Mel Brooks.

"Influence" was succinctly told by a montage of copied scenes of the famous house falling scene:

8ecd69b3df89ce1d10fa7b90cb25b9ec.gif

giphy.gif

Nuff said.

 

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14 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Recently got Covid, so i locked myself in my room for 4 days and watched a load of films on the Criterion channel (not a diss to TCM, but i can only watch Criterion on my laptop)

The Long Goodbye (1973) I enjoyed this but it did take me while to get used to Elliott Gould as Philip Marlowe.  Sadly, Sterling's character of a drunk author seems like a caricature of his real self.  Decent film IMO.  Wish there were more Marlowe films made in this era.

No Way Out (1950) Noir featuring Poitier as a prison doctor who gets on the bad side of a criminal.  Not one of Poitier's bettr films but still an enjoyable noir.

There Was A Crooked Man (1970) Joseph Mankiewicz Western starring Kirk Douglas an d Henry Fonda. I liked the set up of showing the different criminals getting caught during their separate crimes before all ending up together in prison, butkind of lost interest in the film.  The maguffin is the money that Douglas' character has hidden, but all the audience cares about is the planned escape.

 

Sorry to hear you caught Covid. Wishing you a speedy recovery.

THE LONG GOODBYE: Gould just doesn't cut it with me as Marlowe. He's always been an actor to me that is very much watchable, but also very much limited in range.

NO WAY OUT....I actually think this is one of Poitier's best, and while he's excellent here, it's Richard Widmark's hateful, bigoted crook that steals the show. 

THERE WAS A CROOKED MAN.....I actually enjoy this one all the way through. It's interesting to see how (SPOILER)  Kirk Douglas manipulates the other inmates to his side, then he callously tosses them aside and leaves them to their doom (or causes it) once he gets the chance to escape and get to the money that he stole, money he had no intention of sharing with anyone but himself. It makes his comeuppance oh so satisfying as well. I also like how Fonda's character is shown  throughout most of the film to be totally incorruptable until the final few minutes....after he discovers Douglas' corpse and the money. Fonda takes the body back to the prison, but runs off to Mexico with the dough himself.  Interesting climax.

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This may seem stupid to some so if the names Mario Lanza and Zsa Zsa Gabor don't interest you, just move on. TCM just showed For the First Time (1959) and in a way it reminded me of the formulaic way in which MGM used Elvis in the next decade: Let's throw in some pretty (and younger) girls and let him sing a lot. But this one definitely wasn't done on the cheap; great production values and the location shooting in Capri, Salzburg and in some of Europe's grandest opera houses was spectacular. (I assumed it was shot at Cinecitta, but it turns out interiors were shot in Berlin, which was also the source of a lot of the financing.) The Elvis analogy is apt because I can't think of another male star who was used this same way, as the anchor of a series of dramatic/comedic films sprinkled with random musical numbers. (Sinatra maybe, but certainly not exclusively.) It was like a Katherine Grayson movie, but with a guy. (The best of his latter films, imo, was Serenade (1956), which was actually a role-reversed "woman's picture" in which long-suffering Mario bore the career and emotional ups and downs brought about by a capricious woman, Joan Fontaine.) Mario played a singer whose concert career was threatened by his own inattention, until he found purpose in helping a young (very!) deaf girl restore her hearing, which restored his own faith in himself. Pretty standard. You can almost see Elvis doing the same for Shelley Fabres. What really brightened this one up for me was the presence of Zsa Zsa Gabor, whose overall filmography was so skimpy that most people probably aren't even sure how they know her. (Moulin Rouge and Queen of Outer Space being the obvious exceptions) This movie did the near-impossible, actually providing a credible context for the loopy public persona Ms. Gabor had created for herself. She plays a jet-setting countess who effusively swoops in and out of Mario's life, always with an entourage of boy toys (men toys?), throws extravagant parties on the deck of her oceanside villa,, and makes sure to be seen anywhere there are eyes to see her, and always as her charming, chattering self. Maybe it's better that she didn't get this same kind of showcase often because it could get old fast, but she's a standout in this role and I'm so happy to have seen it. 

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11 hours ago, nakano said:

What I noticed is the beautiful, huge Ava Gardner's statue in the opening scenes in the cemetery,it was shown several times in the film,Frank Sinatra got and kept the statue in his garden at home in Coldwater Canyon,until Barbara Marx forced him to remove it in 1976 .

ava1.png

 

Ah, the Rich and Famous. Nice to see they have the exact same problems we do.

 

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Yeeeyeah! Me too!

LOL Tom, your phrasing is hilarious!

You might be interested in this Flynn-Cabot anecdote from Steve Hayes in his book Googies, Coffeeshop to the Stars, Vol.2, Tiki Soo. A little background first: Hayes was a film hopeful newly arrived from England,  who had met Flynn at one of his home parties. Errol liked him so much he invited him to stay in a room in his house for a while. He also offered to sponsor him so that he could stay in California longer (that wouldn't work out but that's another story). In any event I'll pick up Hayes' story at another Flynn house party at the point in which Hee Honk enters the scene:

Just then Bruce Cabot came up. He had enough to drink to be belligerent - or should I say more belligerent. Because by nature he was a brash, swaggering man who as I got to know him better, I sensed was jealous of Flynn. His career never reached the heights he'd expected and that ate away at him. I'm probably prejudiced because I didn't like him from the moment I met him. But I wasn't alone. Whenever his name came up in conversation it didn't bring a lot of enthusiasm from anyone. For the most part they thought he was using Flynn, and Errol's friendship, to pay the rent, so to speak. And later, of course, they were proved right.

Now, Cabot told us Flynn was about to stage a cockfight and wanted us down in the stables. (Steve) Cochran got to his feet.

"What about you?" Cabot said to me when I didn't move.

"You chaps go ahead," I said, "Think I'll pass."

That was all Cabot needed. He started taunting me, calling me pretty boy, a limey sissy who was afraid of a little blood. I replied as calmly as I could it wasn't blood I was afraid of. . . . No, it was just that I didn't enjoy seeing animals tearing themselves apart for human pleasure. There was silence and I hoped Cabot would let it go at that. But he didn't. He continued taunting me and attacking my manhood. I gritted my teeth and again let it slide. Incensed, Cabot got really nasty. And when Gloria (a friend of Hayes) tried to shut him up he turned his anger on her and called her a bunch of foul names.

Cochran told him to cool off and tried to lead him away. Cabot shoved him aside, screaming a few more obscenities at Gloria then began taunting me again. That's when I snapped. I punched him twice in the gut, doubling him over and then, as he gasped for air, uppercut him, putting all my weight behind the blow. Cabot went sprawling and stayed down. I went after him, intending to beat on him some more. But Cochran, Scott Brady and his brother, Lawrence Tierney, grabbed me and pulled me back.

Knowing I just killed my chance of Flynn sponsoring me, I jerked loose from them and stormed into the house. Moments later Gloria joined me in my room. I was already throwing my clothes into my suitcase. I'd never felt lower - or angrier at myself for letting my temper get the better of me. Gloria sat on the bed, afraid to say anything. Presently Errol joined us.

"Out!" he told Gloria. She left without any protest.

Errol then asked me what I was doing. Leaving, I told him. Over a little scrap, he said.

"Bruce is one of your best friends," I began.

"Who can be an obnoxious prick when he's had too many."

"Yes but I didn't have to hit him. I could have walked away. Now I've ruined the party and . . ."

"Let me see your hand," Flynn interrupted. I showed it to him. "A southpaw, eh?" he said. He examined my left hand, pressing for broken bones. "Better put some ice on that."

"It's alright," I protested, "Just a bit skinned up is all."

"Do as I say, ol' chum," Flynn said gently, "Go ask Gammie to give you some ice cubes. She's in the kitchen. Tell her to wrap them in a towel. It'll help keep the swelling down."

"Errol," I said, "I'm really sorry."

"Don't be, sport. Life's too short to be sorry."

After I'd iced my hand Gloria and I decided to ditch the party and take a drive. As we were leaving Ann Sheridan came up and pecked me on the cheek. "Thanks," she said, smiling, "You don't know how many times I've wanted to do that."

"You and everyone else," Gloria chimed in. We left.

The fight was not mentioned again. But years later when Errol lost all his money trying to finance his movie William Tell, I was partially vindicated: It was his co-called friend Bruce Cabot - whom Errol had kept afloat for years by getting him parts in his movies (that's not quite true, Cabot only appeared in Dodge City but it was a major role as, appropriately, the villain) - who treacherously had all of Flynn's property seized in lieu of his salary.

Googies, Coffee Shop to the Stars Vol. 2: Hayes, Steve: 9781593933074:  Books - Amazon.ca

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I also watched 10 RILLINGTON PLACE from 1971 on TCM.

See the source image

it's a very well-made, if AGGRESSIVELY GRAY movie- seriously, are DIRTY, GREASE-SMEARED WALLS a major design trend in ENGLAND? (If so, I must say. I like them better than SHAG CARPETING and FLOCKED WALLPAPER, but not by much.)

it's a PRURIENT TRUE CRIME STORY, and I'm sure it's had a couple hour long DISCOVERY ID episodes done about it...back in 1971 though, this was shocking stuff, and this VERY BRITISH feature  film about a Notting Hill serial killer who frames an innocent tenant of his  for two of his (many, many) crimes reminded me of DAVID LEAN'S MADELEINE, in that it seemed as if it wanted to keep a polite distance from the subject matter, turning to us every now and then to apologize for even telling such a lurid story as the protagonist digs another hole below the floorboards  for his latest unfortunate victim.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH was excellent in a very difficult role of an abortionist/serial killer/ guy with SERIOUS ISSUES WITH WOMEN and JUDY GEESON (of BERSERK!) was really terrific as well, JOHN HURT- who got most of the notices for the film- is also great, but his character is SUCH a question mark, I don't feel like he was done justice by the story and direction.

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Sounds like I need to give The Stunt Man another try. It went over my head I guess when I saw it, although I recall Barbara Hershey 's first scene (in which she falls into the water disguised as an elderly woman and then proceeds to remove the makeup as she is "rescued") as being .ost bizarre and memorable.

No surprise that Stunt Man didn't receive much of a release. Fox begrudgingly distributed it after having it rot on the shelf for two years, since 1978 when it was filmed. It was financed by an independent company called Melvin Simon Productions that had a deal with Fox at the time. Their teen sex film Porky's was huge at the box office but despised by critics. Their other films caused barely a ripple: The Man with Bogart's Face (with a brief cameo from Robert Osbourne), The Runner Stumbles (Stanley Kramer's final film with Dick Van Dyke as a fallen priest wrongfully accused of killing his lover, an equally fallen nun played by Kathleen Quinlan), Chu Chu and the Philly Flash (wretchedly reviewed film that wasted Alan Arkin and Carol Burnett), Scavenger Hunt and Zorro the Gay Blade (two more flop comedies),My Bodyguard (a touching teen drama that was actually one of the best teen films of a decade full of them, not that anybody noticed)

Stunt Man was ultimately one of five non-1980 films contending at the 1980 Oscars: Melvin and Howard was also filmed in 1978, The Great Santini had screenings in North Carolina and Indiana in 1979, My Brilliant Career and Tess were both released overseas in 1979.

This was perhaps due to Hollywood being in low spirits with the majority of their 1980 releases; movie critics were nearly unanimous in declaring it a bad year for the movies, and if that wasn't bad enough, United Artists imploded at year's end.

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On 1/16/2022 at 7:34 PM, HoldenIsHere said:

I am a fan of Meryl Streep by the way.

I have been FIRMLY TEAM MERYL ever since her line read "can somebody PLEASE get THE GOD DAMN DOOR!!!!?" as she nurses a broken PUSSYCAT PINK NAIL  that she has slammed the washing machine lid on in SHE-DEVIL (1989?)

I LIVE for DEATH BECOMES HER, and I saw THE RIVER WILD and HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS in the theater.  ditto THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY (and I HATE Eastwood) i even liked ONE TRUE THING and thought she was a hoot in ADAPTATION. (THE HOURS eats **** though)

So it is with a heavy heart that, as a result of not just one but many small things, MERYL is officially ON PROBATION with me.

(we take you now to 148 acres in Upstate Connecticut for MISS STREEP'S reaction to this news:)

 

In all seriousness though, there is no point in arguing whether or not MERYL is a great actress, she is.

But there got to be a point some time in her career (I would say ca. 1995) where getting NOMINATED STARTED TO mean more to her than it should have.

And I dunno, I don't want to fault her for taking good roles, but she's developed "AND WITH ACADEMY AWARD WINNER JOHN GEILGUD" syndrome, where tacking on her presence at the end of a trailer is BLATANTLY INTENDED  add a veneer of respectibilty to something...whether it deserves it or not.

 

 

(ps- YES, i KNOW THAT'S GLENN CLOSE in the clip.)

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

According to Wikipedia, the film received such a limited release that Peter O’Toole himself said “the film wasn’t released, it escaped.”

 

I watched it on cable the same year!

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

You might be interested in this Flynn-Cabot anecdote from Steve Hayes in his book Googies, Coffeeshop to the Stars, Vol.2,

Thanks for that Tom. I used to have that book but it got lost in some move somewhere.  🙁

For awhile I confused that guy with THIS Steve Hayes 😘:

hqdefault.jpg

 

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16 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Sounds like I need to give The Stunt Man another try. It went over my head I guess when I saw it, although I recall Barbara Hershey 's first scene (in which she falls into the water disguised as an elderly woman and then proceeds to remove the makeup as she is "rescued") as being .ost bizarre and memorable.

 

it helped that I watched it on TUBI (with minimal commercials) and, as such, I was able to pause it at will to "come up for air" periodiclaly.

in fact, i even watched an hour of it and went to bed and watched the rest the next day- which i know offends some of the film purists here, but for some films it just helps to take a breather.

my advice if you wanna check it out again:

1. don't do it sober

2. watch it for the visuals, and O'Toole- DON'T BOTHER TO MAKE SENSE OF THE STORY.

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18 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Thanks for that Tom. I used to have that book but it got lost in some move somewhere.  🙁

For awhile I confused that guy with THIS Steve Hayes 😘:

hqdefault.jpg

 

Nope, an entirely different Steve Hayes, as you know.

Googies, Coffee Shop to the Stars Vol. 1: Hayes, Steve: 9781593933067:  Amazon.com: Books

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39 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have been FIRMLY TEAM MERYL ever since her line read "can somebody PLEASE get THE GOD DAMN DOOR!!!!?" as she nurses a broken PUSSYCAT PINK NAIL  that she has slammed the washing machine lid on in SHE-DEVIL (1989?)

I LIVE for DEATH BECOMES HER, and I saw THE RIVER WILD and HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS in the theater.  ditto THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY (and I HATE Eastwood) i even liked ONE TRUE THING and thought she was a hoot in ADAPTATION. (THE HOURS eats **** though)

So it is with a heavy heart that, as a result of not just one but many small things, MERYL is officially ON PROBATION with me.

(we take you now to 148 acres in Upstate Connecticut for MISS STREEP'S reaction to this news:)

 

In all seriousness though, there is no point in arguing whether or not MERYL is a great actress, she is.

But there got to be a point some time in her career (I would say ca. 1995) where getting NOMINATED STARTED TO mean more to her than it should have.

And I dunno, I don't want to fault her for taking good roles, but she's developed "AND WITH ACADEMY AWARD WINNER JOHN GEILGUD" syndrome, where tacking on her presence at the end of a trailer is BLATANTLY INTENDED  add a veneer of respectibilty to something...whether it deserves it or not.

 

 

(ps- YES, i KNOW THAT'S GLENN CLOSE in the clip.)

I like Meryl as well, but the last ten years have been pretty rocky. Florence Foster Jenkins was her only post 2010 I fully endorsed. Into the Woods was a big disappointment, given how great the material was

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4 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Sorry to hear you caught Covid. Wishing you a speedy recovery.

THE LONG GOODBYE: Gould just doesn't cut it with me as Marlowe. He's always been an actor to me that is very much watchable, but also very much limited in range.

NO WAY OUT....I actually think this is one of Poitier's best, and while he's excellent here, it's Richard Widmark's hateful, bigoted crook that steals the show. 

THERE WAS A CROOKED MAN.....I actually enjoy this one all the way through. It's interesting to see how (SPOILER)  Kirk Douglas manipulates the other inmates to his side, then he callously tosses them aside and leaves them to their doom (or causes it) once he gets the chance to escape and get to the money that he stole, money he had no intention of sharing with anyone but himself. It makes his comeuppance oh so satisfying as well. I also like how Fonda's character is shown  throughout most of the film to be totally incorruptable until the final few minutes....after he discovers Douglas' corpse and the money. Fonda takes the body back to the prison, but runs off to Mexico with the dough himself.  Interesting climax.

Thanks for the wishes on recovery.  It actually wasn't too bad- 24 hours of feeling under the weather and then a lingering cough.  My entire family caught it after me including my 3 year old and 5 month old.  Luckilly it wasn't too bad for them either being unvacced.  You hear that kids aren't affected too much by it, but you never know so we were just happy it wasn't anything serious.

You might actually have swayed my opinion of There Was A Crooked Man i bit.  I watched 5 films that day and this was the last one so my attention was fading a bit.

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Sorry about the three posts, but they are distinctly different subjects. THIS one is I just watched....

Peter Bogdanovich's THE GREAT BUSTER from 2018. I had recorded this when it was on TCM just hadn't watched it yet.

The_Great_Buster_poster.jpg

This was an odd documentary in that the first half is a kind of linear story of Buster's personal life from childhood to his death. The second half is a synopsis of his career highlighting the best movies, scenes & stunts. I'm pretty familiar with Keaton's life & films, so there wasn't much new for me to discover. I'm sure for any newbie this movie will inspire seeking out his classics, much easier than my search before the internet/streaming.

My only beef was the plethora of interviews in the first half of filmmakers/performers who sang his praises of how much he "influenced" them. Who cares? I was further offended screen time was devoted to showing CLIPS of these other people's works! In a movie that's supposed to be about KEATON!

Sorry, showing Spiderman's masked face is no comparison to Keaton's deadpan and only comes across as a further insult. C'mon, doesn't Keaton's universally loved & timelessness (meaning classic) kind of point out how trite & stupid the Spiderman movies or TV show Jackass is in comparison? 50 years from now people will still delight discovering Keaton's brilliant work while all those he "influenced" will be wholly forgotten. 

The only interviews that should have been included were those who either had personal stories like Dick Van Dyke or those who could better explain Keaton's work because of their knowledge & success in the field like Quentin Tarantino & Mel Brooks.

"Influence" was succinctly told by a montage of copied scenes of the famous house falling scene:

8ecd69b3df89ce1d10fa7b90cb25b9ec.gif

giphy.gif

Nuff said.

 

I can't turn this film off whenever i see it playing.  I like the set-up of the doc and think Bogdonavich is right when he defends wanting to spend the last half highlighting the 10 silent masterpieces of KEaton's career.

Some of the people being interviewed i didn't get- but Johnny Knoxville from Jackass does make sense.  Wonder why they didn't include Tom Green- he copied the falling house stunt also in his masterpiece Freddy Got Fingered 😄

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15 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I watched a Sterling Hayden film on the Criterion Channel recently too! Except I cast the Criterion Channel to the TV from my phone so I don't have to watch it on my computer.  I can also watch it through my husband's XBOX One, but casting is easier.  

Anyway, I watched Crime of Passion with Hayden and Barbara Stanwyck.  Hayden was more or less there for the ride as it was Stanwyck's film; but his character did serve as the reason why Stanwyck did the things she did.  It was interesting seeing him a little less grumpy and in more of a romantic part.  I always enjoy seeing him though, he has such a unique presence on screen.

I also watched No Way Out on the Criterion Channel.  I watched it in tribute to Poitier and it was his first film.  I was shocked at how blatant the racism was in this film and how mean and nasty Richard Widmark's character was.  There was no beating around the bush in terms of addressing racism in this film.  Widmark's character did not screw around and was one of the nastiest characters I've ever seen in a film.  There's no way that this film would be made today.  I think this movie would make a great double feature with Odds Against Tomorrow if that was the type of double feature that someone would want to put together. 

I like Crime of Passion.  Hayden is actually becoming one of my favorite actors- been watching a lot of good films with him lately.

Yeah, No Way Out wasn't an easy watch with some scenes.  Widmark's character is definitely relentless with his attacks against Poitier.  You're glad when he gets his comeuppance. 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

back in 1971 though, this was shocking stuff

10 Rillington Place would have been very controversial in 1971 for both the serial killing and the abortion angle as well. I know Richard Attenborough only took the role of the killer to protest capital punishment for the death of the man John Hurt played. I also know that the film has some weird sort of cult following. I saw it about 5 or 6 years ago because some man on a Oscar-oriented messageboard I was part of would never stop talking about it as a masterpiece; very unusual because the film was released 17 years before he was born and he was obsessed with keeping up with practically every new release, not so much classics, and I really don't think its a film that gets revived or televised a lot.

PS As another resident Meryl fan, I have to cosign the disdain for The Hours. It stranded a truly brilliant cast (I usually like Nicole Kidman, Julianne Moore, and Miranda Richardson as well) on a dreary, self-important dirge of a story with the pacing of an arthritic snail on sleeping pills. Phillip Glass' moody score was virtually the only interesting thing about it. I think you can chalk up that failure mostly due to an overpraised book propped up by a Pulitzer prize and an ambitious publishing company [Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, one of the Pulitzer 's two favorite  publishing companies; The other is Knopf, which has an extremely high quality air but more mainstream reading appeal as well. Knopf is my favorite publishing company for contemporary {1920s onward} fiction. ], Weinstein, Scott Rudin, and an overly gullible Academy.

Second postscript, I grew up in a library from the time I was four weeks old. If I go on about books or publishing companies that most wouldn't notice, that's why. Books are in the blood. Just like the movies.

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17 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

10 Rillington Place would have been very controversial in 1971 for both the serial killing and the abortion angle as well.  I saw it about 5 or 6 years ago because some man on a Oscar-oriented messageboard I was part of would never stop talking about it as a masterpiece; very unusual because the film was released 17 years before he was born and he was obsessed with keeping up with practically every new release, not so much classics, and I really don't think its a film that gets revived or televised a lot.

I am concerned about this gentlemen to whom you refer and wonder just what (or who) he may have stuffed in his crawlspace wherever he lives.

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25 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

10 Rillington Place would have been very controversial in 1971 for both the serial killing and the abortion angle as well. I know Richard Attenborough only took the role of the killer to protest capital punishment for the death of the man John Hurt played. I also know that the film has some weird sort of cult following. I saw it about 5 or 6 years ago because some man on a Oscar-oriented messageboard I was part of would never stop talking about it as a masterpiece; very unusual because the film was released 17 years before he was born and he was obsessed with keeping up with practically every new release, not so much classics, and I really don't think its a film that gets revived or televised a lot.

PS As another resident Meryl fan, I have to cosign the disdain for The Hours. It stranded a truly brilliant cast (I usually like Nicole Kidman, Julianne Moore, and Miranda Richardson as well) on a dreary, self-important dirge of a story with the pacing of an arthritic snail on sleeping pills. Phillip Glass' moody score was virtually the only interesting thing about it. I think you can chalk up that failure mostly due to an overpraised book propped up by a Pulitzer prize and an ambitious publishing company [Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, one of the Pulitzer 's two favorite  publishing companies; The other is Knopf, which has an extremely high quality air but more mainstream reading appeal as well. Knopf is my favorite publishing company for contemporary {1920s onward} fiction. ], Weinstein, Scott Rudin, and an overly gullible Academy.

Second postscript, I grew up in a library from the time I was four weeks old. If I go on about books or publishing companies that most wouldn't notice, that's why. Books are in the blood. Just like the movies.

As much as I hate to disagree with both Lorna and CinIntl, I like The Hours and feel a deep personal connection to it. Not so much the Nicole Kidman with a fake nose winning the Oscar part (you know I mean Nicole winning the Oscar, not the fake nose winning the Oscar, or did it?), but I have almost never been moved by a child performance (I could stop right there) as I was by Jack Rovello as Julianne Moore's abandoned son.  I love that this super-arty film had better twists than any thriller of the day: a character assumed to be dead returns; one character turns out to be the older version of another character; one character takes an unexpected exit from the film. All of these twists work for me, and they make the film. In a film with so many great actresses, Jack Rovello and Ed Harris give the standout performances. I also love Julianne Moore in this film, Allison Janney adds a human touch of comedy amongst the Great Ladies of the Theatah, and Toni Collette in a small part is, as always, memorable and real. This is not to slight Meryl, great as always.

 

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48 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I am concerned about this gentlemen to whom you refer and wonder just what (or who) he may have stuffed in his crawlspace wherever he lives.

He kind of ruled the roost back in the day, like a King. Certainly was the one that was most forceful about his opinions and his own personal winners every year. He later married the queen (the most prominent woman) of the board.

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44 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

He kind of ruled the roost back in the day, like a King. Certainly was the one that was most forceful about his opinions and his own personal winners every year. He later married the queen (the most prominent woman) of the board.

No worries here.

I'm not the marrying kind.

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