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3 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

1/4 Bridget Jones' Diary (Miramax, 2001)
Source: TCM

Nakano apparently watched 15 movies while I was typing this, as my laptop kept going BONK! I certainly lack his (?) gift for brevity. Apologies for being long-winded.

First, an editorial. I'm climbing up on my soapbox now. Skip to the next paragraph if you only want to read about the movie. Somebody on these boards started a thread to complain that TCM was showing this film only a week after it aired on Showtime or one of those premium cable channels. It was a relatively unusual complaint for these message boards. The same poster came back later and said he liked the movie. He just disliked that TCM was showing it in such close proximity to another movie channel. I did find it somewhat refreshing that the complaint was not about the movie only being 20 years old, but I still found the complaint to be part of an overall trend where I feel like these have in the last couple of years become the 'TCM Sucks" message boards moreso than just the TCM Message Boards, as a small but very vocal contingent of posters choose to use 99 per cent of their time to voice unhappiness wtih TCM. "The format/graphics/hosts/political viewpoint/movie selections have changed, so I hate TCM." Or geting relatively equal time "NOTHING has changed - they're still showing the same damn movies! - so I hate TCM." It has by and large made these message boards a relatively dreary place to visit for me., as I often feel like a lonely voice in the wilderness attempting to defend or at least explain (and how much do I really know? I'm not privy to what goes on in board meetings. I never joined Backlot or got an invitation to join that other double secret password club whose name I've fogotten but I've seen people on here mention on occasion) TCM's actions. For the life of me, I don't know why people that unhappy with the product continue to watch the channel so much. I think it's just so they have fuel to come back on here and complain some more and that the very act of complaining brings a certain group of people great pleasure. As for the movie in question, my best guess is schedules are set a long time in advance and without much or any foreknowledge of where else a property might be airing, particularly if it's airing on a network owned by another media conglomerate than the one that owns TCM. I don't happen to get Showtime or whatever the other channel was, and I don't care to pay for it, so I was happy to turn on TCM and find a movie I enjoyed that fit comfortably into the "accents" theme, and I said as much in that other thread. Okay, stepping off soapbox. Now on to the movie.

Bridget Jones' Diary was a '90s novel by Helen Fielding, a first-person narrative in the form of the diary entries of a single woman just past 30 who works for a British publishing company who in some ways "has it all" but suffers from insecurity regarding her weight and her bad habits and still yearns for the fairytale concept of happiness provided through romantic attachment. I never read the novel, but I remember reading quite a bit about it at the time. As I recall, it sold well here in the States, but in England, it was an earth-shattering, paradigm-shifting cultural phenomenon the likes of which that country hadn't seen since, I don't know, Dickens? Much more than the story of one woman, it was heralded as nothing less than the definitive take on single womanhood of a certain age in the Western world at the turn of the millennium. I think guessing games about who might be cast in the title role in the film version became something of a national obsession.

Needless to say, Brits were less than thrilled when Texas-born Renee Zellwegger got the job of playing Britain's most famous  fictional female, and there was negative feedback something akin to the revulsion Anne Rice initially expressed over the casting of Tom Curise as L'estat in Inteview with the Vampire, except multiplied by 60 million people. 

Personal aside: to the best of my knowledge, I've never met Zellwegger, but we did both attend the University of Texas at Austin at the same time, and I like to fantasize that we shared one of those freshman classes taken simultanously by 600 students and held in auditorium that were quite common at the university in those days. I believe I'm two years older than her. I mentioned in another thread that I attended both high school and college with Matthew McConaughay, though I'm 99.9% certain he has no idea who I am. McConaughay and Zellwegger worked together on an extremely indie Texas Chainsaw Massacre sequel when they were both UT students (and during which time I assume I was sitting in my dorm room WATCHING movies). I think it was unreleased for a couple of years until an attempt was made to capitalize on his exploding fame. She didn't rocket to stardom quite as quickly as he (she has a bit part in Dazed and Confused, the movie that first got him national attention), but she was in Reality Bites and Love and a .45 and Empire Records beofre she became a household name in Jerry Maguire, her "you had me at hello" line becoming almost as widely quoted as " All right all right, all right". Tom Cruise and Cuba Gooding, Jr., got Oscar nominations (and Gooding a win); Zellwegger did not, but her career path was set after that.

Anyway, a running theme of the month is accents. It looked like the entire UK was hoping and praying for Zellwegger's utter failure, but as best as I can remember, she pulled off the part successfully enough that there was something approaching grudging acceptance.  Curiously, I didn't see the movie in the theaters. This TCM viewing my actually have been my first. But I did catch the two sequels, which certainly gave me an idea of what the original was like. The third film replaced Hugh Grant with an American love interest in Patrick "McDreamy" Dempsey. Otherwise, they all had the same conventional romantic triangle plot, with some personal quirks of the title character thrown in with the intent of making her more endearing. IMDB tells us Zellwegger put on 25 pounds and worked at a London publsihing firm for a month, apparently keeping a photo of then-boyfriend Jim Carrey on her desk the whole time - her co-workers were too polite to ask her about it. Also, she stuck with her British accent for the entirety of filming, including down time. There's an anecdote that Grant reacted initially with shock when Zellwegger used her real voice for the first time at the wrap party, thinking to himself "What the hell is that?"

So, in a nutshell: Bridget Jones meets cute with a man named D'arcy (Colin Firth) at a Christmas party thrown by her parents. The in-joke is Fielding named the character for the guy in Pride and Prejudice, most recently played by Firth in, I think, a BBC miniseries. and so, rather than the torches-and-pitchforks reaction caused by Zellwegger's casting, Brits were quite satisified that Firth was going to get play another D'arcy. It's actually "re-meet" cute: we're told by all the older generation at the party that the pair grew up on the same street and that at the age of four, Bridget ran naked through the wading pool of D'arcy, then eight, an event D'arcy claims not to remember (we later find out he does). He's at the party wearing an ugly Christmas sweater that 20 years later seems to have become fashionable. They don't hit it off - she jokes about New Year's resolutions while holding a cigarette in one hand and a martini in the other. He lets loose on what he really thinks of her, unaware that she's in earshot, and it appears he's torpedoed any chance of romance.

Soon after, Bridget begins a workplace flirtation with her boss (Grant), initiated by leering glances between office windows and a suggestive exchange of emails, all of which was apparently totally cool in 2001 but would get the Grant character "Me Tooed" in modern times. A much-talked about scene is when the two get amorous for the first time and begin peeling off their clothes, she initially not remembering she's put on form-fitting granny panties that are intended to hold her figure when fully dressed but provoke only laughter when underwear is all she's wearing. 

Might be a good time here to interject that Bridget in states of half-dress and undress are a recurring theme in the film, and Zellwegger is game for these. In addition to the aforementioned panties scene, there's a party where all the guests come dressed either as members of the clergy or wh*res (the movie seems to imply this is a real British thing), and Bridget goes full Playboy bunny complete with rabbit ears and a cotton tail.  And then the final scene when she goes chasing after D'arcy in her underwear.

Bridget's boss proves to be a far-from-reliable boyfriend, and Grant seems to relish getting to play a full-on cad. They break up halfway through the movie, and work becomes awkward enough Bridget has a career transition to TV reporter (there are some amusing scenes in which her attempts to look like the ideal job candidate go terribly wrong, until she admits in one inteview she admits she left her last job because she was "shagging the boss" ... and promptly gets hired. Made me think of Morgan Freeman finally saying he doesn't give a sh*t what the parole board does in Shawshank and thereby immediately gets paroled). It's through her new job that D'arcy, who's a lawyer (barrister do they say?) re-enters her life, and just as he and Bridget begin to get chummy again, Grant's Daniel also re-enters the picture. There's a running subplot indicating there's bad blood between the two male leads concerning a long-ago incidient involving a woman they both knew. Bridget hears one version of the story, and anyone who's ever watched five seconds of any romantic comedy will know that this isn't the true version, which is only revealed in the final act. Meanwhile, the two men get into a protracted fistfight, the gag being that they're both too old and professional for this sort of thing. It's a set piece I think intended to make the male viewers happy, but this male viewer could have done without it, frankly.

Things finally veer into extremely formulaic romantic comedy territory including a drive to the airport to try to stop someone from catching a plane and the aforementioned chase through the streets of London in underwear. It's pretty obvious how the romantic triangle is going to resolve itself, so much so that the movie seems to lose interest in the triangle and keeps postponing the final moment through a series of misunderstandings and a partial reading by D'arcy of the titualar diary. It drags the movie out another 15 minutes more than it needed to be in my opinion. Anwway, it's not the end, as Bridget goes through the romantic triangle thing again with Firth and Grant in Bridget Jones: the Edge of Reason and then Firth and Dempsey in Bridget Jones' Baby.

Overall, I was charmed by the performances if somewhat bored by the formulaic story. i found Zellwegger to be successful on pretty much all fronts - she's funny, sexy, flawed, neurotic and achingly romantic. Not sure how well she syncs up with the character as envisioned by Fielding in the novel, but it works for me. I don't have much to say about the accent, even though the theme was accents. She didn't ruin my suspension of disbelief. Firth intentionally seems like a bit of a drip early on but gets to go full on object of desire as the movie proceeds. Grant was my favorite of the three leads. It's funny - I recall renting movies to watch with my mom in the Blockbuster days, and she would refuse to watch anything with Grant, because she found him "so annoying" - I'm unsure if she meant his acting ability or the scandals he got into in real life. It kind of made me sad I never tried to get her to watch Florence Foster Jenkins, in which he also plays a philanderer but one with a pathos-heavy backstory regarding his relationship with his wife. I thought he was fantastic in that movie, and I've heard raves about the post-credits musical number he gets to do in Paddington 2, of all things. He's great fun here, if a bit one-dimensional. I'm unfamiliar with most of the rest of the cast other than Jim Broadbent as Bridget's sad-sack father, who has his own minor storyline regarding his wife apparently leaving him. He's quite touching in his handful of scenes. Bridget has the standard Brit rom-com group of besties who each have one character trait - there's a woman who says the "F" word a lot and a man who had one hit pop song years ago and lives in a constant state of quasi-celebrity (makes me think of Grant in that movie he did with Drew Barrymore).

From what I've read, the movie leaves out quite a bit of the book, typically a source of unhappiness for those who read a book first, but most IMDB reviewers seem to think it captures the essence of the novel. Scenes like the aforementioned fight scene indicate it's striving to not be thought of merely as a "chick flick". I don't know if everyone in London has such a posh accent (speaking of accents) and snow on Christmas Eve might be a bit much, but it is late in the movie, and you're supposed to be a blubbering mess by this time.

Directed by Sharon Maguire, who took the second movie off but returned for the third one. She also directed Incendiary with Michelle Williams and Ewan MacGregor and the Disney comedy Godmothered with Isla Fisher and Jillian Bell. There's a bit of ballyhoo that all three movies were directed by women, but it's worth noting that the screenplay for this one is by a man, Richard Curtis, of Four Weddings and a FuneralNotting Hill and Pirate Radio. You can defnitely hear echoes of those other movies in the scenes where Bridget dines or goes to a bar with her friends. And Curtis and Grant clearly like working together.

Total films seen this year: 9

Bridget Jones's Diary (2001) - IMDb

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

The British novel on which it is based is MUCH DARKER and even SUPERNATURAL (The character of Ruth *literally* becomes a devil in order to avenge herself on Mary Fisher. ) 

another story ripe for a remake.

The BBC did a mini-series before the movie came out.  I've not seen it.  It follows the book more closely than the film did.  It was nominated for CableACE awards here in the US, so some cable channel showed it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Life_and_Loves_of_a_She-Devil_(TV_series)

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21 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

1/4 Bridget Jones' Diary (Miramax, 2001)
Source: TCM

Nakano apparently watched 15 movies while I was typing this, as my laptop kept going BONK! I certainly lack his (?) gift for brevity. Apologies for being long-winded.

 

 

 

I do not read long detailed reviews, as I prefer watching a movie without too much info,if you like  to do a lenghty review fine for you, I have watched 27 movies this year so far and 605 in 2021,nothing compared to Lawrence or several others . Yes, you certainly lack the gift of short reviews , but your gift is 'the How to be brief in 48 volumes.'...review 

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59 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

The BBC did a mini-series before the movie came out.  I've not seen it.  It follows the book more closely than the film did.  It was nominated for CableACE awards here in the US, so some cable channel showed it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Life_and_Loves_of_a_She-Devil_(TV_series)

I saw it as a kid when it aired in America on PBS over the summer of 88 (I think?)

it. Is. WILD.

Seriously the Hollywood film doesn’t even scrape the surface of some of the wacky, depraved stuff the book/ BBC series gets into- and the She Devil and Mary Fisher characters have DRASTICALLY DIFFERENT FATES.

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1 hour ago, King Rat said:

Understood. Can't think of the guy without remembering the Ricky Gervais comment from the Golden Globes. Haven't seen the Meryl version of Into the Woods, only the PBS filming that CinemaInternational mentioned. That was good, though I had seen an amateur production which had stronger actors in a few roles, especially the Baker.

 

59 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

WHAT DID GERVAIS SAY?

I honestly think there are entire chat rooms and communities on the Internet dedicated to speculating aloud as to just why James Corden has been forced on us as a People, Speculation ranges from a deal with the devil to agreeing to betray us to the robot overlords who run the matrix.

The Ricky Gervais comment about James Corden went something like this: "This year James Corden was a big *****. He was also in the Cats movie."

Before the She-Devil movie, there was a British mini-series called Confessions of a She-Devil (the title of the novel), starring Patricia Hodge and Annette Badland. It was much better and worth seeking out. As you can see from the clips, Meryl has to do a fair amount of acting to get the accent which Patricia Hodge could take for granted.

 

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1 minute ago, King Rat said:

 

The Ricky Gervais comment about James Corden went something like this: "This year James Corden was a big *****. He was also in the Cats movie."

Before the She-Devil movie, there was a British mini-series called Confessions of a She-Devil (the title of the novel), starring Patricia Hodge and Annette Badland. It was much better and worth seeking out. As you can see from the clips, Meryl has to do a fair amount of acting to get the accent which Patricia Hodge could take for granted.

 

I thought it was LIFE AND LOVES OF A SHE DEVIL…?

(I think we were posting at the same time, read my above post)

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10 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have been FIRMLY TEAM MERYL ever since her line read "can somebody PLEASE get THE GOD DAMN DOOR!!!!?" as she nurses a broken PUSSYCAT PINK NAIL  that she has slammed the washing machine lid on in SHE-DEVIL (1989?)

I LIVE for DEATH BECOMES HER

Yes . . .

 

And yes

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11 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I like Crime of Passion.  Hayden is actually becoming one of my favorite actors- been watching a lot of good films with him lately.

Yeah, No Way Out wasn't an easy watch with some scenes.  Widmark's character is definitely relentless with his attacks against Poitier.  You're glad when he gets his comeuppance. 

If you haven’t seen it yet, I highly recommend Crime Wave. Hayden is fantastic in that film. I also liked him with Gloria Grahame in Naked Alibi. I want to watch Johnny Guitar before it leaves Criterion. I’ve always wanted to see that film. 

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I apologize for making things so MERYLCENTRIC, but I feel compelled to note, an interesting, very rare unsteady period in STREEP'S CAREER began with SHE-DEVIL, shortly thereafter she was nominated for POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE (1990) and then did not get another nomination until 1995, for THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY, in the years 1991-1994, I remember reading some thinkpieces that pondered whether or not she was finally "done for..." (I also know she fired her agent when she lost REMAINS OF THE DAY to EMMA THOMPSON)

This culminated in the UTTER NADIR that was 1994's HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS, a film which I will be kind and not post any clips from here, but it is worth checking out to see that even MERYL has had some MISSTEPS (also worth seeing is GLENN CLOSE'S SOUTH AMERICAN FRAU BLUCHER IMPRESSION in the same film)

I think this "dry period" affected her, and resulted in a change- both willing and not- on her part wherein she became the PERENNIAL NOMINEE...and some would say backstabbing, role-stealing, COW, but...you know...that's just FAYE DUNAWAY screaming at the ceiling.

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54 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

also, MAMMA MIA ate ****.

(to the surprise of all of you, I am sure, I despise ABBA with the HEAT OF A THOUSAND SUNS.)

Lol. I’ve never seen Mamma Mia. There’s just something about it that doesn’t look appealing. 

Re: Meryl. It seems like in the last decade or so, she’s just appearing in everything and anything. I suppose with 3 Oscars under your belt, there probably isn’t a whole lot more to prove; but Meryl has made some very *interesting* choices in the last few years. Choices that made me wonder if the movie would have even been made had she not agreed to appear. The last thing she did that I loved I think would be The Devil Wears Prada. 

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16 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Bridget Jones meets cute with a man named D'arcy (Colin Firth) at a Christmas party thrown by her parents. The in-joke is Fielding named the character for the guy in Pride and Prejudice, most recently played by Firth in, I think, a BBC miniseries. and so, rather than the torches-and-pitchforks reaction caused by Zellwegger's casting, Brits were quite satisified that Firth was going to get play another D'arcy.

I enjoyed your long review.  I saw the movie when it first came out primarily because I was a fan of Fielding from when I lived in England and read her hilarious newspaper column every week.  She was sort of a female,  British, Dave Barry.  

I just wanted to add that not only was D'arcy being played by the same actor who played Mr. Darcy in "Pride and Prejudice," the plot of the movie follows the plot of the Jane Austen novel.  The incident when she over-hears him  sneering about her, Mr. Darcy's rival being a long held enemy because of a young woman, her miss-readings of everything he does, etc.  Some of that dragged out ending you didn't much like was because the movie was still trying to mirror that extremely popular mini-series.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Lol. I’ve never seen Mamma Mia. There’s just something about it that doesn’t look appealing. 

Re: Meryl. It seems like in the last decade or so, she’s just appearing in everything and anything. I suppose with 3 Oscars under your belt, there probably isn’t a whole lot more to prove; but Meryl has made some very *interesting* choices in the last few years. Choices that made me wonder if the movie would have even been made had she not agreed to appear. The last thing she did that I loved I think would be The Devil Wears Prada. 

I saw MAMMA MIA with some friends and their kids when there was nothing else to do, some night (i think) in the dead of winter YEARS AGO

it is a hazy memory, but I seem to recall that various facts are given throughout the film from which one can extrapolate that STREEP'S character in MAMMA MIA is supposed to be- I kid you not- 38 years old.

IN 2008.

and nothing against MERYL now, mind you, ....

but Honey....

EDIT- I EVEN GOOGLED IT, SHE WAS 58 AT THE TIME!

 

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I saw MAMMA MIA with some friends and their kids when there was nothing else to do, some night (i think) in the dead of winter YEARS AGO

it is a hazy memory, but I seem to recall that various facts are given throughout the film from which one can extrapolate that STREEP'S character in MAMMA MIA is supposed to be- I kid you not- 38 years old.

and nothing against MERYL now, mind you, ....

but Honey....

 

 

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12 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

If you haven’t seen it yet, I highly recommend Crime Wave. Hayden is fantastic in that film. I also liked him with Gloria Grahame in Naked Alibi. I want to watch Johnny Guitar before it leaves Criterion. I’ve always wanted to see that film. 

I watchedJohnny Guitar last year for the first time.  I like it and will gladly rewatch it- but it seems to get a lot of attention and not sure why other than it's a rare Western to feature a strong woman lead and is directed by Nick Ray.  Maybe those reasons are enough to make it stand out.  But it was good.  I enjoy watching Haden play a good guy and Ernest Borgnine play a villian.

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Re: Meryl. It seems like in the last decade or so, she’s just appearing in everything and anything. I suppose with 3 Oscars under your belt, there probably isn’t a whole lot more to prove; but Meryl has made some very *interesting* choices in the last few years. Choices that made me wonder if the movie would have even been made had she not agreed to appear. The last thing she did that I loved I think would be The Devil Wears Prada. 

She hasn't sold out to her "audience" like Nicole Kidman has, but she's...been acting a little goofy lately.  Meryl wanted to do comedy for her entire Oscar-winning 80's, and we all agreed that She-Devil "didn't count" once Defending Your Life could be officially recognized as the first.

 Disney's recent "Cruella" movie only existed because the studio had gotten Prada's screenwriter Aline McKenna for another project, and thought "Sayyy...Meryl Streep as a nasty fashion designer? 🤔  "  But if Meryl's infamously goofy anti-Disney rant wasn't at the Golden Globes, where everyone can be excused for being a little drunk-Thanksgiving smashed on stage, well, for the record, which award show WAS it??

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56 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

I watchedJohnny Guitar last year for the first time.  I like it and will gladly rewatch it- but it seems to get a lot of attention and not sure why other than it's a rare Western to feature a strong woman lead and is directed by Nick Ray.  Maybe those reasons are enough to make it stand out.  But it was good.  I enjoy watching Haden play a good guy and Ernest Borgnine play a villian.

Johnny Guitar gets a lot of attention for a few reasons:

1) overly dramatic;   Some of the lines, especially from Sterling Hayden when discussing  "love" border on the comical.     In fact I can't recall a film where Hayden was so animated. (maybe it had to do with the fact he really disliked Crawford).

2) The performance and character as play  by Mercedes McCambridge as Emma:    does she really love The Dancin Kid or Vienna (Crawford's character)?     As said in Gilda:  there is a fine line between love and hate and the amount of attention Emma shows towards Vienna implies something.      Add to this both women dressed like cowboys downplaying their femininity.      

McCambridge also disliked working with Crawford:  "After filming, McCambridge and Hayden publicly declared their dislike of Crawford, with McCambridge labeling Crawford, "a mean, tipsy, powerful, rotten-egg lady".[14] Hayden said in an interview, "There is not enough money in Hollywood to lure me into making another picture with Joan Crawford. And I like money." [15]

3)   A noir western done in very vivid color.      

Thus the film is now known as a camp classic.       The first time I saw it I said "are they serious",  but after repeated viewing there is a lot to love about this film.  It is  unique and that makes it special.     

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9 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Johnny Guitar gets a lot of attention for a few reasons:

1) overly dramatic;   Some of the lines, especially from Sterling Hayden when discussing  "love" border on the comical.     In fact I can't recall a film where Hayden was so animated. (maybe it had to do with the fact he really disliked Crawford).

2) The performance and character as play  by Mercedes McCambridge as Emma:    does she really love The Dancin Kid or Vienna (Crawford's character)?     As said in Gilda:  there is a fine line between love and hate and the amount of attention Emma shows towards Vienna implies something.      Add to this both women dressed like cowboys downplaying their femininity.      

McCambridge also disliked working with Crawford:  "After filming, McCambridge and Hayden publicly declared their dislike of Crawford, with McCambridge labeling Crawford, "a mean, tipsy, powerful, rotten-egg lady".[14] Hayden said in an interview, "There is not enough money in Hollywood to lure me into making another picture with Joan Crawford. And I like money." [15]

3)   A noir western done in very vivid color.      

Thus the film is now known as a camp classic.       The first time I saw it I said "are they serious",  but after repeated viewing there is a lot to love about this film.  It is  unique and that makes it special.     

Very good points.  I never had heard that about Hayden and McCambridge disliking Crawford.  Love hearing the inside details like that.

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22 hours ago, nakano said:

Magnificent Doll 1946 Produced by Universal

When I saw the title and that it was a Universal movie, I would have expected Maria Montez as the doll.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I saw MAMMA MIA with some friends and their kids when there was nothing else to do, some night (i think) in the dead of winter YEARS AGO

it is a hazy memory, but I seem to recall that various facts are given throughout the film from which one can extrapolate that STREEP'S character in MAMMA MIA is supposed to be- I kid you not- 38 years old.

IN 2008.

and nothing against MERYL now, mind you, ....

but Honey....

EDIT- I EVEN GOOGLED IT, SHE WAS 58 AT THE TIME!

 

Lol. I’ve always wanted to see Sextette, solely because 83-year old Mae West cast herself as a 28-year old. 

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I apologize for making things so MERYLCENTRIC, but I feel compelled to note, an interesting, very rare unsteady period in STREEP'S CAREER began with SHE-DEVIL, shortly thereafter she was nominated for POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE (1990) and then did not get another nomination until 1995, for THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY, in the years 1991-1994, I remember reading some thinkpieces that pondered whether or not she was finally "done for..." (I also know she fired her agent when she lost REMAINS OF THE DAY to EMMA THOMPSON)

This culminated in the UTTER NADIR that was 1994's HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS, a film which I will be kind and not post any clips from here, but it is worth checking out to see that even MERYL has had some MISSTEPS (also worth seeing is GLENN CLOSE'S SOUTH AMERICAN FRAU BLUCHER IMPRESSION in the same film)

I think this "dry period" affected her, and resulted in a change- both willing and not- on her part wherein she became the PERENNIAL NOMINEE...and some would say backstabbing, role-stealing, COW, but...you know...that's just FAYE DUNAWAY screaming at the ceiling.

I enjoyed She-Devil! I thought she was really funny in that. I only vaguely remember House of Spirits. Came and went quickly. Yes, she did have a dry period in the 90s. Even some of her nominated films didnt do well at the B.O. (One True Thing: that  MusicTeacher movie)

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