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9 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Faye is extremely glamourous here

FAYE is NUCLEAR LEVELS OF GLAMOUR. 
It’s like she’s single-handedly trying to make up for everything about the first four years of the decade being so BUTT UGLY , (and she comes damn close.)

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I had the marvelous opportunity to see "The Towering Inferno " in a theater on opening weekend.  I loved it, as did the entire audience. 

I had read the two "novels" which were cobbled together to create the storyline, "The Tower" and "The Glass Inferno."

If you've seen "Fame" you may recall that one of the students re-enacts OJ in the movie for her Performing Arts audition!

(Susan Flannery bursting aflame out of the skyscraper window was quite spectacular to see in a theater.)

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

THE TOWERING INFERNO is a pretty good film, and one of my mom's favorite movies. I am surprised that no one has thought to remake it as of yet. 

I also agree with you on O.J....no matter how many times I have to remind myself that this was made 2 decades before the murders, I still want to puke every time he's on screen.

If I had to righteously and retroactively turn my back on every star who messed up his reputation, I'd have to throw out my Bill Cosby records from the 60's.  Not gonna do it, ha ha haaa...

I was on a binge for watching all those 70's disaster movies on DVD that my parents had no interest in seeing when I was a kid, and if I had to pick "the" definitive one--not just "good", but good in a way that demonstrates all the historical tropes--if it came down to a three-way tie between Towering Inferno, The Poseidon Adventure, and Airport '77 (and The Hindenburg disqualified as separate subgenre), Inferno is the one I'd see put in a glass museum box for posterity.  The other two might have better casts or scenes, but Inferno puts all the Irwin Allen rules into play, and looks good doing it.  There's a reason this one got the trendy box-office-fueled  Oscar nom.

(Earthquake had too much hammy Charlton Heston, Airport '79 had two quick-bite mini-disasters but felt cheap and rushed, and the other Irwin Allen films were as ridiculous as his Lost in Space years.)

I had read the two "novels" which were cobbled together to create the storyline, "The Tower" and "The Glass Inferno."

That's probably why the movie confusingly has TWO heroes--Which book had maverick anti-authority architect Paul Newman, and which book had maverick anti-authority fireman Steve McQueen?

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1 hour ago, nakano said:

Untamed 1955   20th Century Fox . Directed by  Henry King. Tyrone Power  Susan Hayward Richard Egan  Agnes Moorehead. Story set around 1890 ,over several years, in South Africa during or just before the Boers War.I say before because Power is a Dutch rebel leading. a guerilla against  England.Nice cinematography filmed at different places in South Africa,Hayward had to stay in the USA because of her first divorce battle was going on,she did not want to lose  a possible custody of her twins. Power is not present all the time, reappearing each time after several months or years,I guess he had to do  another film or something. The story is good  somewhat reminds me of Out of Africa 30 years before not only the location but the relationship of the two leads. Good  battle scenes against the Zulus,Could have inspired Stanley Baker for the sixties movie,Zulu.Last film after 18 years for Power at Fox,he became a free agent. 111 minutes 7/10

untamed.jpg

Untamed can also be seen as another variation of Gone With the Wind, like Reap the Wild Wind. Susan Hayward, in her days as Edythe Marriner, actually read for the role of Scarlett O'Hara. Tyrone Power plays the Rhett Butler figure to Susan Hayward's Scarlett in Untamed, which begins in Ireland, ancestral home of the O'Haras. Untamed isn't bad, though I got the impression that a lot of story had been condensed, especially in the last third of the movie.

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27 minutes ago, King Rat said:

Untamed can also be seen as another variation of Gone With the Wind, like Reap the Wild Wind. Susan Hayward, in her days as Edythe Marriner, actually read for the role of Scarlett O'Hara. Tyrone Power plays the Rhett Butler figure to Susan Hayward's Scarlett in Untamed, which begins in Ireland, ancestral home of the O'Haras. Untamed isn't bad, though I got the impression that a lot of story had been condensed, especially in the last third of the movie.

Yes i passed on the Ireland segment, but since i have not read the novel,i do not know about the detailed story but yes it was certainly condensed,, i did not think of GWTW but it makes sense,but it reminds me in a way of Out of Africa made 30years later but with a better ending

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1 hour ago, Roy Cronin said:

I had the marvelous opportunity to see "The Towering Inferno " in a theater on opening weekend.  I loved it, as did the entire audience. 

I had read the two "novels" which were cobbled together to create the storyline, "The Tower" and "The Glass Inferno."

If you've seen "Fame" you may recall that one of the students re-enacts OJ in the movie for her Performing Arts audition!

(Susan Flannery bursting aflame out of the skyscraper window was quite spectacular to see in a theater.)

I’m jealous! These kids today just don’t understand what it was to see a movie like that in a theater, especially a packed house.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

If I had to righteously and retroactively turn my back on every star who messed up his reputation, I'd have to throw out my Bill Cosby records from the 60's.  Not gonna do it, ha ha haaa...

I was on a binge for watching all those 70's disaster movies on DVD that my parents had no interest in seeing when I was a kid, and if I had to pick "the" definitive one--not just "good", but good in a way that demonstrates all the historical tropes--if it came down to a three-way tie between Towering Inferno, The Poseidon Adventure, and Airport '77 (and The Hindenburg disqualified as separate subgenre), Inferno is the one I'd see put in a glass museum box for posterity.  The other two might have better casts or scenes, but Inferno puts all the Irwin Allen rules into play, and looks good doing it.  There's a reason this one got the trendy box-office-fueled  Oscar nom.

(Earthquake had too much hammy Charlton Heston, Airport '79 had two quick-bite mini-disasters but felt cheap and rushed, and the other Irwin Allen films were as ridiculous as his Lost in Space years.)

That's probably why the movie confusingly has TWO heroes--Which book had maverick anti-authority architect Paul Newman, and which book had maverick anti-authority fireman Steve McQueen?

now that you mention it, ROBERT WAGNER should probably get a MR YUCK sticker too. 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

now that you mention it, ROBERT WAGNER should probably get a MR YUCK sticker too. 

What did Robert Wanger do?

Obviously this is a rhetorical question but anyone that would put Wanger in the same category as O.J.    should get a Mr. YUCK sticker.

 

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21 hours ago, EricJ said:

That's probably why [THE TOWERING INFERNO]  confusingly has TWO heroes--

of all the problems that I have with THE TOWERING INFERNO, the film having TWO HEROES isn't one of them, and I think it's actually handled really well, maybe as the result of a happy accident resulting from what I can only imagine was a CONSTANT behind-the-scenes d!ck measuring contest between NEWMAN and McQUEEN- they both have the exact same number of lines and (more or less) two scenes together, mid-way through and at the end- and the rivalry is able to be played out between the two onscreen, one (correctly) blaming the other for the whole mess, and the other trying to assert that, NO, HE is THE JOHN MCLANE of this particular picture.

when you get right down to it, PAUL NEWMAN'S character in THE TOWERING INFERNO is a well-meaning idiot and a crappy architect who gets a lot of people killed.

wise that he stuck to SALAD DRESSING in real life.

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13 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

**although, HAVE YOU READ the NUTRIONAL INFORMATION on THE CAESAR DRESSING????

Speaking of salad dressing and plays/movies, Green Goddess dressing was named in honour of George Arliss, who was performing in the play The Green Goddess in San Francisco. He was staying at the Palace Hotel, where, in his honour, the chef created the dressing named for his play (and later movie).

arliss-rajah-courtesy-arliss-archives.jp

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Playgirl (1940) with Kay Francis.  This movie was a lot of fun.  Kay is a mature and sophisticated gold-digger, training an ingenue type to do the same thing.  Kay's good with light comedy and still looks great in clothes, although her face is showing a little worse for wear.  There's an awareness of that in the film, as she jokes about how the older the men get, the younger the women are that they desire, and later, she has a scene with the mother of her conquests, also an attractive woman, who says that Kay's at least 2 years older than she is.   In many ways, this film has a pre-code or European flavor.  Kay's lifestyle choices are accepted without judgement, and she doesn't suffer in the end, just goes on to the next conquest, although someone closer to her own age.  This was a pleasant contrast to Comet over Broadway (1937) which I watched earlier in the week, where the theme is that Kay definitely has to suffer for her ambitions as an actress by almost losing her child.  Margaret Hamilton almost steals Playgirl as Francis' wise-cracking personal assistant, and Nigel Bruce is most amusing as one of her "marks."

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ChristmasHoliday1SDurbin.jpg..1944 Directed by Robert Siodmak, Written by Somerset Maugham, Herman Mankiewicz

Deanna Durbin, Gene Kelly, Gale Sondergaard, Dean Harens
Oscar nomination for Best Musical Score 

Not for just an hour - Not for just a day
Not for just a year, but always.

                        Always by Irving Berlin

Deanna sings just two sultry ballads and her voice is lovely.

By the title and cast I was expecting a light musical with a Christmas theme. What a dark and noirish turn it took!  Opens on Christmas Eve, as inclement weather strands Harens in New Orleans for the night. He meets Deanna singing in the lounge of his hotel and they decide to attend a Midnight Mass together.  The first sign of trouble is when she loudly breaks down sobbing during "O Come All Ye Faithful" and has to be escorted out.  This is also the point where any pretense of being a Christmas flick is abandoned entirely. 

Over the course of an evening we learn (along with Harens) about her life, told in flashbacks.  Gene Kelly as her ex-husband is no good, a spoiled mama's boy, a gambler and killer, but he can turn on the charm. When he comes home with blood on his pants and Deanna sees his mother put them in the incinerator, she starts asking questions. Maybe I kept expecting Kelly to break into a soft-shoe routine, but he wasn't totally convincing as a psycho to me.  On the other hand, Gale Sondergaard as his overprotective mother was superb.  

"When it was all over, the psychoanalyst said that Robert's relations with his mother was pathological."   No kidding.

Reportedly Mank was fired off the film when studio brass saw him drunk on the lot.  He was hired back a week later, and rated Christmas Holiday as one of his favorites of the 40's.  The talent among this film makes it a delightful surprise. 7.5/10

full movie

 

 

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2 hours ago, Swithin said:

Speaking of salad dressing and plays/movies, Green Goddess dressing was named in honour of George Arliss, who was performing in the play The Green Goddess in San Francisco. He was staying at the Palace Hotel, where, in his honour, the chef created the dressing named for his play (and later movie).

To be honest, I scrolled up and FIRST thought the picture was Hank Azaria's Blue Raja ("You don't even wear blue!") from Mystery Men (1999).

hqdefault.jpg

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I had the good fortune of seeing two pre-code movies on the big screen yesterday.  Alicia Malone came to the Redford Theatre in Michigan to introduce them.  She was enthusiastic about presenting two of her favorite pre-code movies - Trouble in Paradise and Merrily We Go to Hell.  I have seen Trouble in Paradise before and rank it among my favorite pre-codes too.  If you ever wondered what the Lubitsch Touch means, see this movie.  Herbert Marshall and Miriam Hopkins are two extraordinary and sophisticated crooks who are madly in love with each other.  The trouble starts when they decide to rob Kay Francis.  Edward Everett Horton and Charles Ruggles also add laughs as Kay's hopeful suitors who clearly have no chance with her.  I thought this would be a great movie to watch with an audience, and it didn't disappoint.  From its witty dialogue to Kay Francis's fabulous wardrobe and the Art Deco sets, this romantic comedy offers escapism at its best.

Although I wouldn't rate Merrily We Go to Hell as highly as Trouble in Paradise, I did think it was a good movie.  Not surprisingly, life is not "happily ever after" when the charming, but alcoholic, character played by Fredric March marries Sylvia Sidney, who Alicia says has the saddest eyes in Hollywood.  Although, Sylvia loves Fredric, she has reason to be sad because he still carries a torch for a past love.  I found this 1932 movie reminiscent of other "modern marriage" movies of the 1930s, such as The Divorcee (1930) and No More Ladies (1935).  Although Merrily We Go to Hell blends comedy and drama together, it has some heartbreaking moments, and I felt more sympathy for Sylvia Sidney than I did for Norma Shearer or Joan Crawford in the previously mentioned movies.  I was interested in seeing Merrily We Go to Hell because it was one of the few Cary Grant movies that I hadn't seen.  However, his screen time is very limited.  Another familiar face that shows up briefly is Asta in one of his first film appearances.  I also enjoyed seeing Esther Howard in one of her early movie roles, looking much younger than she does in the Preston Sturges movies that first introduced me to her.  I was glad Alicia pointed out that this movie was directed by Dorothy Arzner and spoke some about Dorothy's career in a male dominated field.

Alicia graciously signed autographs, posed for pictures, and talked with moviegoers before the films and during intermission, which made this enjoyable night at the movies even more memorable.

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On 1/22/2022 at 12:56 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched and then rewatched most of (with some skipping of the OJ scenes) THE TOWERING INFERNO (1974)

while this film is entertainingly bad at (MANY) moments, there is an undeniable something to it, it compels you, it drags you in- it's a brilliant premise and there are genuinely affecting scenes.

Disaster movies with all-star casts were big box office draws in the 1970s.  I watched AIRPORT 1975 (1974) for the first time recently. This is a movie I’ve wanted to see for a while but somehow didn’t make it happen until now. It was a follow-up to the highly successful AIRPORT from 1970.

This movie was a lot of fun with moments of genuine tension as the air disaster unfolds as well as enjoyment of some of the cheesier elements when seeing this movie in 2022. I will say Charlton Heston rocks his yellow turtleneck.

Karen Black stars as the head stewardess (as flight attendants were called back then) of commercial Flight 407 bound from the east coast for Los Angeles, and she is wonderful in the role.  The disaster begins when a businessman (played by Dana Andrews) suffers a heart attack while flying a private plane and crashes into the cockpit of the commercial jet, killing the co-pilot and leaving the pilot unable to see! What’s Head Stewardess Nancy (Karen Black) going to do? She’s going to have to fly the plane!

The stewardess’s estranged boyfriend (a pilot played  by Charlton Heston) and the airline executive played by George Kennedy (the only AIRPORT cast member who is also in AIRPORT 1975) give her instructions over radio. I’m not a big fan of Heston (even though he went to the same high school in the Chicago suburbs that I did), but I like him a lot in this movie.  And Karen Black strikes just the right balance between panic and calm when forced to take control.

Much of the fun comes from the all-star cast playing the passengers.  There’s Linda Blair (a year after she appeared in THE EXORCIST) as a girl in desperate need of a kidney transplant. Myrna Loy is a hoot as a woman who loves her booze. Sid Caesar plays a man who took the flight because he had a bit part in the movie being shown on the plane. Pop singer Helen Reddy plays a nun who (surprise!) sings a song to the kidney patient. And then there’s Gloria Swanson as HERSELF, who is dictating her memoirs.  AIRPORT 1975 would be Gloria Swanson’s final movie appearance.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, HoldenIsHere said:

and the airline executive played by George Kennedy (the only AIRPORT cast member who is also in AIRPORT 1975) give her instructions over radio.

He also shows up as pilot again, in The Concorde: Airport '79 (1979):

As both Kennedy and French pilot Alain Delon trade studly girl-in-every-port tips when not disastering, leading to the immortal exchange:
Stewardess (Sylvia Krystel):  "Oo, you pilots are such...men!"
Kennedy;  "They don't call it a ****pit for nothing!"

(Yes, even Otto hated that one.)  🤦‍♂️

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On MOVIES-TV:   The Secret of Convict Lake (1951) with Glenn Ford,  Gene Tierney, Ann Dvorak,  Zachary Scott,  Ethel Barrymore and  Ruth Donnelly.

Good enough film due to the fine cast.       Note that I often visit Convict Lake since it is along Highway 395,  which is the road seen in Out of the Pass to Bridgeport CA (the little town at the start of that film).    It was nice seeing the lake and the local area.

While the movie narrator claimed the story was based on a true one,  that wasn't the case.      

Caftan Woman: THE SIXTH ANNUAL BARRYMORE TRILOGY BLOGATHON: The Secret of Convict  Lake, 1951

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12 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Disaster movies with all-star casts were big box office draws in the 1970s.  I watched AIRPORT 1975 (1974) for the first time recently. This is a movie I’ve wanted to see for a while but somehow didn’t make it happen until now. 

I have never seen a disaster movie - actually more frightened of the scenarios than horror movies! In fact, I can't see any movie that portrays drowning & almost lost my cookies in the theater seeing the ending of Captain Courageous!

After all the talk in here about these all-star disaster movies, I would love to give one a try, they sound kind of formulaic & fun.

10 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

On MOVIES-TV:   The Secret of Convict Lake (1951) with Glenn Ford,  Gene Tierney, Ann Dvorak,  Zachary Scott,  Ethel Barrymore and  Ruth Donnelly.

Wow another great cast in a movie I've never heard of! TCM is a great station, but streaming certainly has expanded the choices. Syracuse winters are made for many long hours of movie watching- we'll warm up to the Towering Inferno.

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Three Secrets from 1950 with Eleanor Parker, Patricia Neal, Ruth Roman and Edmon Ryan

 
 
Despite sharing the lead with two other women, Three Secrets is Patricia Neal's movie. It's a B-picture melodrama, but she gives it grit and gravitas with an outstanding performance.
 
A plane crashes on a remote mountain top. A military spotter plane takes pictures revealing that a five-year-old boy is the sole survivor. The challenge is how to rescue him before he succumbs. 
 
A famous mountain climber is brought in to lead a team up the 12,000 foot peak, while a media frenzy ensues at the mountain's base.
 
With the boy's parents, apparently, casualties from the crash and, since authorities discovered, the family has no relatives, the boy, Johnny, if rescued, will be an orphan. 
 
Through flashbacks, we then learn Johnny was adopted and that one of three women - all who converge on the mountain - is his biological mother, but the adoption agency won't release that information. 
 
Five years after giving up their babies, each woman is struggling with that decision and what it means if Johnny survives and if she is the mother. 
 
Through further flashbacks, we learn the women's backstories. Eleanor Parker had a quicky affair with a soldier on leave and, then, at her mother's urging, to save her "reputation," went away to have the baby and, quietly, give it up for adoption. 
 
The second woman, Ruth Roman, had an affair with a wealthy man who dumped her and, then, tried to pay her off when she told him she was pregnant. In a fit of rage, she kills him, is sentenced for manslaughter and, then, gives the baby up for adoption from prison. She has since served her sentence and been released.
 
The third woman, Patricia Neal, is a successful international journalist married to a sportswriter who comes to resent her lack of interest in a traditional home and family (note the riffing on Woman of The Year). 
 
Five years ago, Neal came back from Europe as a famous war correspondent wanting to restart her marriage. After she throws herself sexually at her now emotionally distant husband, he, in a quietly brutal scene, tells her he no longer "wants" her - ouch. It's one of those moments that justifies a lot of mundane movie watching. 
 
They briefly give it a try anyway, but she soon flies off on assignment again and he divorces her. Now overseas, she realizes she's pregnant and comes back to the States to find him remarried. She never tells him she's pregnant and gives the baby up for adoption. Right or wrong, Neal makes big decisions with speed and conviction - she's no ditherer.
 
Five years ago, these three women met, on the same day, at the same adoption agency, as they gave up their babies. Owing to the plane crash, they've now met again at the foot of the mountain. Based on the facts reported in the paper and their personal adoption stories and timelines, each is in anguish wondering if it is her child up there. 
 
Patricia Neal is covering the story for her paper, while the other two came to the mountain out of a sense of responsibility. Yet it is Neal who pulls the three together amidst the chaos. This no-nonsense woman also has time to outsmart, out think and out report the men - she's a firecracker. 
 
After a harrowing climb by the rescue team, the report from the top of the mountain comes down that the boy, Johnny, is okay. But what will these women, one of who is the mother of the now parentless boy, do?
 
Once again, it is Neal to the rescue. She bullies (yup, bullies) her male editor into blasting past adoption agency rules and any laws to find out which one is the mother. There's still one more plot twist to go, but while it's advertised a bit in advance, let's leave it there for those who haven't seen the movie.    
 
To appreciate Three Secrets, one has to accept that words and phrases like "normal family," "illegitimate baby" and "reputation" were powerful memes back then. Wrong, yes, but they were the water society swam in, leaving these single and pregnant women, in the 1940s, with baleful life decisions to make.
 
The story is contrived, the budget shoestring and the acting uneven (Eleanor Parker all but sleeps through her role), but Patricia Neal and Edmon Ryan, as her newspaper reporter frenemy, along with the always outstanding directing of Robert Wise, elevate Three Secrets well above its material.  
 
 
N.B. #1 For Hitchcock fans, it's neat when you realize the center of the plot of this story, a kid being rescued off a mountain, is just a macguffin. We often forget about the boy because we're absorbed in the movie's real focus, the lives of the three women. 
 
N.B. #2 If Patricia Neal in real life was half as smart, half as no-nonsense and half as decent (without any fanfare) as her screen persona is here and in other movies - and if she was half as beautiful in person - she's the one you marry if by grace of God she'll have you.
 
N.B. #3 I owe @TopBilled a big hat tip for pointing this one out in the "Neglected Films" thread. His post got me to search out an okay copy on YouTube. However, seeing a restored version on TCM someday would be a real treat. That said, if you can, it's well worth the YouTube watch until then. 
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17 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Disaster movies with all-star casts were big box office draws in the 1970s.  I watched AIRPORT 1975 (1974) for the first time recently. This is a movie I’ve wanted to see for a while but somehow didn’t make it happen until now. It was a follow-up to the highly successful AIRPORT from 1970.

This movie was a lot of fun with moments of genuine tension as the air disaster unfolds as well as enjoyment of some of the cheesier elements when seeing this movie in 2022. I will say Charlton Heston rocks his yellow turtleneck.

Karen Black stars as the head stewardess (as flight attendants were called back then) of commercial Flight 407 bound from the east coast for Los Angeles, and she is wonderful in the role.  The disaster begins when a businessman (played by Dana Andrews) suffers a heart attack while flying a private plane and crashes into the cockpit of the commercial jet, killing the co-pilot and leaving the pilot unable to see! What’s Head Stewardess Nancy (Karen Black) going to do? She’s going to have to fly the plane!

The stewardess’s estranged boyfriend (a pilot played  by Charlton Heston) and the airline executive played by George Kennedy (the only AIRPORT cast member who is also in AIRPORT 1975) give her instructions over radio. I’m not a big fan of Heston (even though he went to the same high school in the Chicago suburbs that I did), but I like him a lot in this movie.  And Karen Black strikes just the right balance between panic and calm when forced to take control.

Much of the fun comes from the all-star cast playing the passengers.  There’s Linda Blair (a year after she appeared in THE EXORCIST) as a girl in desperate need of a kidney transplant. Myrna Loy is a hoot as a woman who loves her booze. Sid Caesar plays a man who took the flight because he had a bit part in the movie being shown on the plane. Pop singer Helen Reddy plays a nun who (surprise!) sings a song to the kidney patient. And then there’s Gloria Swanson as HERSELF, who is dictating her memoirs.  AIRPORT 1975 would be Gloria Swanson’s final movie appearance.  

 

 

 

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22 hours ago, Katie_G said:

ChristmasHoliday1SDurbin.jpg..1944 Directed by Robert Siodmak, Written by Somerset Maugham, Herman Mankiewicz

Deanna Durbin, Gene Kelly, Gale Sondergaard, Dean Harens
Oscar nomination for Best Musical Score 

Not for just an hour - Not for just a day
Not for just a year, but always.

                        Always by Irving Berlin

Deanna sings just two sultry ballads and her voice is lovely.

By the title and cast I was expecting a light musical with a Christmas theme. What a dark and noirish turn it took!  Opens on Christmas Eve, as inclement weather strands Harens in New Orleans for the night. He meets Deanna singing in the lounge of his hotel and they decide to attend a Midnight Mass together.  The first sign of trouble is when she loudly breaks down sobbing during "O Come All Ye Faithful" and has to be escorted out.  This is also the point where any pretense of being a Christmas flick is abandoned entirely. 

Over the course of an evening we learn (along with Harens) about her life, told in flashbacks.  Gene Kelly as her ex-husband is no good, a spoiled mama's boy, a gambler and killer, but he can turn on the charm. When he comes home with blood on his pants and Deanna sees his mother put them in the incinerator, she starts asking questions. Maybe I kept expecting Kelly to break into a soft-shoe routine, but he wasn't totally convincing as a psycho to me.  On the other hand, Gale Sondergaard as his overprotective mother was superb.  

"When it was all over, the psychoanalyst said that Robert's relations with his mother was pathological."   No kidding.

Reportedly Mank was fired off the film when studio brass saw him drunk on the lot.  He was hired back a week later, and rated Christmas Holiday as one of his favorites of the 40's.  The talent among this film makes it a delightful surprise. 7.5/10

full movie

 

 

I watched this last night. Never seen it before. What an odd film for Durbin. I didn't even recognize her. 

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