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27 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

if they had cast CLIFTON WEBB instead of JAMES STEWART, I could see that BEING DELIGHTFUL.

At this point there are ENTIRE TRUE CRIME TV SERIES just about MURDEROUS CHILDREN, so I think the subject matter of ROPE wouldn't be shocking enough for a 2022 audience, maybe not even in THE THEATRE, we've all been desensitized to TRUE CRIME STORIES and GAY TRUE CRIME STORIES that the story of two dudes strangling another guy and then having a buffet dinner on top of his dead body afterwards is so tame as to almost be any given Sunday in West Hollywood.

Once again, I recently watched 1948's Rope and 1959's Compulsion, both  based on the Leopold and Loeb crime.  And, for me, both still pack a wallop.

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2 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

Once again, I recently watched 1948's Rope and 1959's Compulsion, both  based on the Leopold and Loeb crime.  And, for me, both still pack a wallop.

I found things in "Rope" I liked, but saw it as a middling Hitchcock effort. I thought "Compulsion" was a better movie covering the same raw material. My comments on "Compulsion" here: https://www.thefedoralounge.com/threads/what-was-the-last-movie-you-watched.20830/page-1477#post-2876753

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it might even be THE BEST (if anyone pulled a gun on me and demanded I name STREEP'S FINEST WORK ON THE SPOT**, it's the title I'd blurt out without hesitation.)

[Keeping in mind that I haven't seen IRONWEED or some of her more recent endeavors]

she strikes a perfect balance of [incredible] TECHNICAL ACTING with [multifaceted] EMOTIONAL ACTING, it's a REAL PERFORMANCE and one HELL of a challenging part.

SAM NEILL was SO CUTE back in the day too!!!!!!

 

**and, Hell, you never know, we live in uncertain times.

Sam Neill cute? You betcha!! And not many actors as manly and good-looking as he would risk playing a not very bright weakling as he does in A Cry in the Dark.

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1 hour ago, mkahn22 said:

I found things in "Rope" I liked, but saw it as a middling Hitchcock effort. I thought "Compulsion" was a better movie covering the same raw material. My comments on "Compulsion" here: https://www.thefedoralounge.com/threads/what-was-the-last-movie-you-watched.20830/page-1477#post-2876753

COMPULSION is certainly a less constrained film than the aptly titled ROPE.

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Just now, King Rat said:

Sam Neill cute? You betcha!! And not many actors as manly and good-looking as he would risk playing a not very bright weakling as he does in A Cry in the Dark.

And THE PIANO (Even though I don’t like almost everything else about it.)

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it might even be THE BEST (if anyone pulled a gun on me and demanded I name STREEP'S FINEST WORK ON THE SPOT**, it's the title I'd blurt out without hesitation.)

[Keeping in mind that I haven't seen IRONWEED or some of her more recent endeavors]

she strikes a perfect balance of [incredible] TECHNICAL ACTING with [multifaceted] EMOTIONAL ACTING, it's a REAL PERFORMANCE and one HELL of a challenging part.

SAM NEILL was SO CUTE back in the day too!!!!!!

 

**and, Hell, you never know, we live in uncertain times.

its one of her four best along with Bridges of Madison County, Postcards from the Edge,  and Silkwood, that's for sure. [As stated before, her work since 2010 is rocky so you are not missing much; The Iron Lady which she won that third oscar for was pretty dull outside of her performance. Florence Foster Jenkins was her best in recent years, but The Post, her las nomination to date, was a disappointing ham-fisted version of the Pentagon papers story. I liked the newest version of Little Women, but she's only in it for about 6 minutes. Florence Foster Jenkins aside, her last great showcases were Doubt and Julie and Julia.]

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32 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

its one of her four best along with Bridges of Madison County, Postcards from the Edge,  and Silkwood, that's for sure. [As stated before, her work since 2010 is rocky so you are not missing much; The Iron Lady which she won that third oscar for was pretty dull outside of her performance. Florence Foster Jenkins was her best in recent years, but The Post, her las nomination to date, was a disappointing ham-fisted version of the Pentagon papers story. I liked the newest version of Little Women, but she's only in it for about 6 minutes. Florence Foster Jenkins aside, her last great showcases were Doubt and Julie and Julia.]

I think August: Osage County (2013) is also a standout during that period. It's really gruelling family-gathering stuff, which isn't exactly original,  but it was a good reminder of what a great ensemble player Meryl can be when she's not being expected to carry a whole movie. I agree that Florence Foster Jenkins may have been her recent best. I saw it in a theater and liked it, then sought out the DVD later on when I found it was still resonating with me. 

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This may just be me being salty this morning, and I’m not even going to name specific examples, but I just have to note out loud in public somewhere that (as a fan of documentaries) I have had to quit watching more than a few recent efforts because they were framed as:

“So this is a film about “XYZ.”… But really, I wanna talk about ME and who I am and what XYZ means to ME and this film is going to be about how *I* perceive XYZ what it means to MY LIFE and, namely, ME.  With interviews with my parents my friends and everyone important in my life to talk about how the subject affected ME…. Even though I’m a middle-aged white guy  and this is ostensibly supposed to be a documentary about the struggles of Allen Iverson.”

 

now let’s play the theme: “🎶me me me me me me MEEEEEEE🎶

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24 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

We truly have become the most solipsistic society in history.

Thank you for getting me to go to onelook.com to learn a new word!

I watched 'Andrei Rublev' Friday night.  I did doze off a couple of times during the broadcast, but I stuck with it.  This has been shown on TCM before, but I had never seen it in its entirety (excluding the 15 minutes or so when I nodded off).  I don't know what it is about Russian cinema or feature films about Russia, but most of them seem to be very long, detailed, and drawn out affairs.  Movies like this one, "The Battleship Potemkin", "Reds", and "Doctor Zhivago" seem to spare no expense in telling their particular stories, since brevity and succinctness come in short supply!  Of course, if you live in a cold-weather climate as I do, television can be a great time-waster on nights that are sub-freezing.   In this instance, watching a Russian-made effort at the end of January on a bone-chilling night was sort of worth it and certainly appropriate to the season.  As usual too, in a long movie such as this (about 3 hours), there are thousands of extras in various scenes, and it never ceases to surprise me as to how a director can get so many men and women to perform in a unison that is believable, and sometimes, unforgettable as a story unfolds.

One thing that caught my eye was how 'Andrei Rublev' sort of mirrored the movie 'The Moon and Sixpence', in that, it was shot in black and white (and very well, I might add), but the end of the film showcased the Orthodox priest's church artwork and was shot in color.  Overall, I liked this movie, in spite of its breadth that covered a good chunk of the early 1400's and showcased the cruelty of nobles and marauding bands of horsemen who terrorized the simple Russian countryside folk.  I'd give this one a 7 out of 10 rating.

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My trip through movie watching has certainly taken some weird turns. I did some search on my library's collection and found NO DEPOSIT, NO RETURN '76. It stars Don Knotts, David Niven, Vic Tayback, Barbara Feldon....how could I go wrong? What a terrible mess of a film that was.  BUT,  I did notice Charles Martin Smith, as another stereotypical "nerd" as his Toad charactor in the more successful AMERICAN GRAFFITI '73. Really, Smith stole every scene he was in, in this teeny supporting role.

I requested both very beloved movies NEVER CRY WOLF '83 & GRAFFITI from my library just to revisit CM Smith. But I also saw STONE OF DESTINY 2008 among his writing/directing credits. Wow-that one sounded right up my alley so I searched & found it streaming on IMDB!

It's the TRUE story of a large stone that was a fixture in the Scottish Monarch crowning ceremony stolen by Kind Edward 1 in 1296 & placed in Westminster Abbey. Worse, the stone was placed under Britain's coronation throne seat! Oy! The Scots have been insulted by the Brits in so many ways, the stone becomes a symbol of independence and a couple of college kids plot to bring it back to Scotland. A 600 lb block encased under an ancient wooden throne!

The story is all about their caper and despite some thick accents, pretty exciting. You just have to ignore the "mumbling" although most of the time they speak very clearly. The editing and story arc keep a perfect pace and the scenery of course is spectacular. I was amazed Westminster Abbey conceded to allow filming inside, but so glad they did-you couldn't reproduce the grandeur and even the sound of an echo-y stone cathedral.

I was on the edge of my seat for most of it and (as usual) cried at the ending. I think Charles Martin Smith is my new hero; although he's a fine actor, his writing & directing make him a star in my book.

Stone_of_destiny.jpg

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Peyton Place form 1957 with Diane Varsi, Lana Turner, Lee Phillips, Hope Lange, Arthur Kennedy and LLoyd Nolan

 
 
The mid 1950s to the early 1960s is the Golden Age of soap opera / melodrama movies with the apotheosis of the genre being Peyton Place. If you like this type of movie [insert casual whistle with eyes looking around at the ceiling], there is none better.
 
It's all here: extramarital affairs, single young women kept by older married men, babies born to "widows" (who aren't really), domestic violence including a father **** his step daughter, murder, buried bodies (literally and figuratively), young kids buying "banned" books, doctors performing abortions marked down as appendectomies (or something "not abortion"), homes and families on the "right" and "wrong" side of the tracks, Oedipal Complex mothers messing up their sons' heads, clandestine nude swimming, rumors, gossip, alcoholism, suicide (gruesomely by hanging) and more.
 
All of that happens in pretty Peyton Place, a small, idyllic-looking New England town where the good people dress their best for Sunday church. Yet, as Lloyd Nolan, the town's doctor and conscience states, "We have half a dozen churches, which most of you attend and then don't practice the word they preach once you walk down the steps."
 
Peyton Place the movie comes from the giant, indulgent, entertaining but also very perceptive book by the same name (comments here: https://www.thefedoralounge.com/threads/what-are-you-reading.10557/page-401#post-2449613). The movie, like the book, works because, even if exaggerated, much of it rings true. 
 
Books and movies like this shine a light on the worst and, sometimes, the best in us, which leaves out a lot of the everyday living people do inside the lines. You are not getting a balanced view in Peyton Place, but that doesn't make any of its story untrue, just know the lens has been intentionally directed to see the most sordid and  hypocritical parts. 
 
Focusing on a few of the town's young girls and boys, the movie tells its story mainly through their eyes in this coming-of-age tale. There are a lot of stories and plotlines to Peyton Place, so think of the movie this way: you can visit a "typical" New England town and watch its young grow up, with all those timeless challenges, from the 1930s into the 1940s, while their parents do all the bad and, sometimes, good things parents do while trying to maintain the outward appearance of respectability.
 
Looking back, movies like this were part of the, ultimately, successful effort to break down the massive social stigma of, ready-set-go: addictions, pre-marital sex, extra-marital affairs, single parents, abortion, divorce, kids being curious about sex, etc. Today, most of those things are no longer a source of shame, at least not nearly to the degree they once were. Heck, many are now celebrated.
 
But destigmatizing those things didn't mean they went away (for many, their occurrences have increased) or that some don't still create great personal and social problems, but at least they are more out in the open with many sympathetic to their challenges.
 
Those things that are still horrible - like domestic violence and rape - also, sadly, haven't been eliminated or even had their occurrences reduced, but they are, at least, no longer considered a source of shame for their victims. 
 
These are serious and real problems, then and now, but you watch a giant ball of soap opera cheese like Peyton Place to wallow in all the dirty laundry and hypocrisy of society in a safe way. 
 
Because, by the 1970s, the idea of "respectable" society had been so diminished and the restrictions on what could be shown or done in movies all but eliminated, soap-opera pictures mainly became depressingly gruesome and extreme affairs lacking any balance or hope. 
 
It's why the soap operas of the mid 1950s to the early 1960s are the most engaging - there was still a respectable society with its hypocrisy and unfair taboos to confront and expose. It was a contradiction and tension that made for good storytelling. A contradiction and tension wonderfully, saponaceously and indulgently exploited in Peyton Place.  
 
    
 
 
 
 
 
 
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2 hours ago, midwestan said:

Thank you for getting me to go to onelook.com to learn a new word!

I watched 'Andrei Rublev' Friday night.  I did doze off a couple of times during the broadcast, but I stuck with it.  This has been shown on TCM before, but I had never seen it in its entirety (excluding the 15 minutes or so when I nodded off).  I don't know what it is about Russian cinema or feature films about Russia, but most of them seem to be very long, detailed, and drawn out affairs.  Movies like this one, "The Battleship Potemkin", "Reds", and "Doctor Zhivago" seem to spare no expense in telling their particular stories, since brevity and succinctness come in short supply!  Of course, if you live in a cold-weather climate as I do, television can be a great time-waster on nights that are sub-freezing.   In this instance, watching a Russian-made effort at the end of January on a bone-chilling night was sort of worth it and certainly appropriate to the season.  As usual too, in a long movie such as this (about 3 hours), there are thousands of extras in various scenes, and it never ceases to surprise me as to how a director can get so many men and women to perform in a unison that is believable, and sometimes, unforgettable as a story unfolds.

One thing that caught my eye was how 'Andrei Rublev' sort of mirrored the movie 'The Moon and Sixpence', in that, it was shot in black and white (and very well, I might add), but the end of the film showcased the Orthodox priest's church artwork and was shot in color.  Overall, I liked this movie, in spite of its breadth that covered a good chunk of the early 1400's and showcased the cruelty of nobles and marauding bands of horsemen who terrorized the simple Russian countryside folk.  I'd give this one a 7 out of 10 rating.

thanks! it's really overdue to be WEBSTER'S WORD OF THE YEAR.

I also will watch just about anything about RUSSIAN HISTORY- it always puts my life into perspective (ie it coulD ALWAYS be WORSE.).

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I apologize in advance that I am posting of videos which most people can never watch because they are exclusive to: Disney+ but it may be that a few here might for other reasons use a free trial offer to the service or who subscribe but never explored all of the crooks and nannies of the site.

I am sorry also that my descriptions are so very minimal. They are short videos and it is difficult to say much of them while avoiding spoilers. I would hate to detract from their wonder and innocence. 

 

BURN-E (2008) Eight minutes. This is the simple tale of a simple worker droid who simply wishes to do his simple job. Events on a grander scale keep making things complicated. 

This takes place within: WALL-E (2008) in the vein of: "it is a big ship and much is happening but the main movie can show only what affects the main characters".   


For the Birds (2000) Four minutes. This is a charmingly tiny morality play showing what may happen if you ridicule and pick on those who are different.


Jack-Jack Attack (2005) Five minutes. A teenaged babysitter becomes unglued when a superhero's infant begins to show his powers.

This takes place within: The Incredibles (2004). I have read that it was meant to be in that movie but was cut for reasons of time.


Presto (2008) Five minutes. A magician's rabbit wishes to be fed. Chaos ensues.


Lifted (2006) Five minutes. Imagine a teenager taking his first driving test and having a little accident. Or two. Or twenty. Transpose that to a young alien attempting to abduct a sleeping human while under the watchful eye of a humorless examiner. 


Disney+ has a wealth of cartoons and shorts in their: Movies->Shorts menu. I urge all who have access to the channel to explore them.

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6 hours ago, SansFin said:

I apologize in advance that I am posting of videos which most people can never watch because they are exclusive to: Disney+ but it may be that a few here might for other reasons use a free trial offer to the service or who subscribe but never explored all of the crooks and nannies of the site.

Actually, the Pixar shorts are all on their own set of anthology Blu-ray disks by now, but not sure if the ones named are all on the same volume.

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10 hours ago, SansFin said:

Jack-Jack Attack (2005) Five minutes. A teenaged babysitter becomes unglued when a superhero's infant begins to show his powers.

This takes place within: The Incredibles (2004). I have read that it was meant to be in that movie but was cut for reasons of time.

The Incredibles was the first movie I saw in a theater so Jack-Jack Attack is an special favorite of mine.  It was included on the DVD release of The Incredibles.

One of my favorite quotes from Jack-Jack Attack is Kari's line to Jack-Jack: "Now who's ready for some neurological stimulation?"   I used to  drive my mother crazy saying that, using the same inflection as Kari did when she says it  in the cartoon. 

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On TCM (east coast) right now is "Grand Hotel." The print is of a pretty poor quality for TCM as much of the background feels shadowy or dark and nothing is really crisp. I believe I've seen crisp, clean versions of "Grand Hotel"  in the past on TCM, but as opposed to others here, I don't keep digital copies, so I can't compare. Thus, this is just from memory. Has anyone else noticed this about "Grand Hotel" on TCM"

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On 1/18/2022 at 1:15 PM, TomJH said:

Nope, an entirely different Steve Hayes, as you know.

Googies, Coffee Shop to the Stars Vol. 1: Hayes, Steve: 9781593933067:  Amazon.com: Books

I have this book. It’s interesting though I’m not sure how accurate. He seemed to know so many stars on a personal level that it  appears suspicious 

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5 hours ago, mkahn22 said:

On TCM (east coast) right now is "Grand Hotel." The print is of a pretty poor quality for TCM as much of the background feels shadowy or dark and nothing is really crisp. I believe I've seen crisp, clean versions of "Grand Hotel"  in the past on TCM, but as opposed to others here, I don't keep digital copies, so I can't compare. Thus, this is just from memory. Has anyone else noticed this about "Grand Hotel" on TCM"

there have been quite a few instances in recent years where TCM ran bad prints of something even though a better print exists- WHITE ZOMBIE recently and not long ago FRENCHMAN'S CREEK and THE WALLS OF MALAPAGA were both shown in versions so poor I couldn't finish them.

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Hoo boy.

For a while now, I have wanted to see LUCHINO VISCONTI'S 1969 film THE DAMNED [**and BOY are they EVER!]

I even tried to rent it on amazon this Christmas and it was sadly unavailable...

so imagine my thrill when it turned up under a rock somewhere...

Holy **** though, this movie is A LOT- but if I had to pare it down I'd say it's like watching a hybrid version of HAMLET and MACBETH and DYNASTY with CROSS-DRESSING NAZIS directed by DOUGLAS SIRK.

See the source image

I liked it, and yet I HAVE TO SAY, THERE IS CHILD ABUSE DEPICTED IN THIS FILM AND- AS SUCH- IT'S NOT ONE FOR EVERYBODY AND I CAME REALDAMNCLOSE TO TURNING IT OFF IN ONE SCENE, even though it wasn't explicit and both actors were honestly really good.

There are extended parts of this film in GERMAN with NO SUBTITLES, so I can't really say I fully understand the 30 minute long EXTENDED NAZI KIKI SESSION BY THE LAKE  that ends in the BEER HALL PUTSCH, but- um- it was engrossing.

(Sorry, my spelling is all wrong I am sure.)

DIRK BOGARDE is in this (!) and he is very good, more ELECTRIC than I have ever found him before, man, he really was one of the BRAVEST actors of the late 60s/early 70s wasn't he?

the INTERIORS and COSTUMES (and JEWELS!!!!!) are great- lots of MARCEL WAVES and PLUCKED BROWS and THE WOMEN WEAR THEIR DIAMONDS TO BED!!!!!!!!

this film is DECADENT TRASH, but it's totally okay with that, and BY THE END, God Help Me, so was I.

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On 1/29/2022 at 4:05 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

We truly have become the most solipsistic society in history.

I had to look up "solipsistic" too.  I had no idea what it meant.  After reading the definition, I couldn't agree with you more.

Everyone thinks their experience or opinion matters.  Look at recipes online where you have to scroll past dozens of paragraphs of nonsense until you get to the actual recipe.  I don't care about your life, your house, your family, what you were doing when you came up with the recipe, how you feel when you're eating the recipe, how others feel when they're eating the recipe, your nostalgia thinking about the recipe... blah blah blah.  Just tell me how to make the soup!   I will abandon looking for the recipe if I get too annoyed by the writer's meandering prose. 

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3 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I had to look up "solipsistic" too.  I had no idea what it meant.  After reading the definition, I couldn't agree with you more.

Everyone thinks their experience or opinion matters.  Look at recipes online where you have to scroll past dozens of paragraphs of nonsense until you get to the actual recipe.  I don't care about your life, your house, your family, what you were doing when you came up with the recipe, how you feel when you're eating the recipe, how others feel when they're eating the recipe, your nostalgia thinking about the recipe... blah blah blah.  Just tell me how to make the soup!   I will abandon looking for the recipe if I get too annoyed by the writer's meandering prose. 

ANNE REARDON is an AUSTRALIAN LADy with a youtube channel called HOW TO COOK THAT and it's fascinating- and she did an episode where she looked into some of the ABSOLUTELY INSANE and lengthy NARRATION THAT PLAYS OVER SOME OF THESE RECIPE VIDEOS- stories where children talk about letting strangers into houses, people apprehending criminals etc.

sorry,. total aside here, but check out her debunking vids on youttube, she's one of the few really good cooking channels

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ANNE REARDON is an AUSTRALIAN LADy with a youtube channel called HOW TO COOK THAT and it's fascinating- and she did an episode where she looked into some of the ABSOLUTELY INSANE and lengthy NARRATION THAT PLAYS OVER SOME OF THESE RECIPE VIDEOS- stories where children talk about letting strangers into houses, people apprehending criminals etc.

sorry,. total aside here, but check out her debunking vids on youttube, she's one of the few really good cooking channels

I can just imagine a child letting a stranger into the house and then the two of them have a glorious afternoon cooking together.  The stranger teaches the child how to whip up a cheese soufflé and a scratch tomato soup or something.  Then the child and stranger break bread together and happily part ways.   

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On 1/29/2022 at 7:04 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

This may just be me being salty this morning, and I’m not even going to name specific examples, but I just have to note out loud in public somewhere that (as a fan of documentaries) I have had to quit watching more than a few recent efforts because they were framed as:

“So this is a film about “XYZ.”… But really, I wanna talk about ME and who I am and what XYZ means to ME and this film is going to be about how *I* perceive XYZ what it means to MY LIFE and, namely, ME.  With interviews with my parents my friends and everyone important in my life to talk about how the subject affected ME…. Even though I’m a middle-aged white guy  and this is ostensibly supposed to be a documentary about the struggles of Allen Iverson.”

 

now let’s play the theme: “🎶me me me me me me MEEEEEEE🎶

i fired off this post at 7:00 am using my phone and being in a surly mood already.

i don't know why i didn't come out and say that i had just tried to watch an ESPN DOCUMENTARY (I don't care about sports, but I LOVE a SPORTS SCANDAL) about ALLAN IVERSON (aka the NBA guy who choked his coach at practice.) And the DOCUMENTARY was done by one of the HOOP DREAMS guys...and for MAYBE 4 minutes, the guy talked about ALLEN IVERSON and how he grew up in a house with 14 people and he never got his fair share of anything...AND THEN THE NARRATOR PROCEEDS TO GO AT LENGTH ABOUT HIS (meaning THE NARRATOR;S and not IVERSON'S) FATHER AND WHAT A SPORTS NUT HE WAS AND OH, HE OWNED A FURNITURE STORE,  AND THEN HE SHOWS HOME MOVIES OF HIS HOME (MEANING THE NARRATOR'S) AND THEN HE  INTERVIEW HIS (OWN) MOTHER ABOUT HIS FATHER- 25 MINUTES AND NOTHING ABOUT ALLEN IVERSON OR CHOKING THE COACH.

Just the GALL of these people.

i remember CLINT EASTWOOD did a DOC that aired on TCM  a long time ago that was ostensibly about JOHNNY MERCER but was, in fact, ALL ABOUT CLINT EASTWOOD AND CLINT EASTWOOD'S INTERPRETATIONS OF MERCER...

as a SOUTHERNER, i was offended.

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