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I Just Watched...


speedracer5
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3 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I can just imagine a child letting a stranger into the house and then the two of them have a glorious afternoon cooking together.  The stranger teaches the child how to whip up a cheese soufflé and a scratch tomato soup or something.  Then the child and stranger break bread together and happily part ways.   

you nailed it. i can tell you've seen one of these vids. they all come from SOUTH KOREA and the voices sound uncanny and computer generated.

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39 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

there have been quite a few instances in recent years where TCM ran bad prints of something even though a better print exists- WHITE ZOMBIE recently and not long ago FRENCHMAN'S CREEK and THE WALLS OF MALAPAGA were both shown in versions so poor I couldn't finish them.

Thank you for responding. It was so bad, I, one, checked other channels to make sure it wasn't my TV and, two, went into the other room to check that TV - same thing. I get the "rights" thing, but my God, is TCM's budget that tight that it can't afford to rent the better versions. And if it is't renting the better versions, who is? My point, if the idea of the owner of these better copies is to make money, if they don't rent to TCM, how much other demand for them is there? I understand when there's a poor copy of something on Tubi or YouTube, but TCM makes less sense to me. 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Everyone thinks their experience or opinion matters.  Look at recipes online where you have to scroll past dozens of paragraphs of nonsense until you get to the actual recipe. 

The idea has recently been put forth that a serial killer could openly present all of the grizzly details of their crimes and yet never be caught if they simply put the confessions in the blog portion above recipes. 

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

The idea has recently been put forth that a serial killer could openly present all of the grizzly details of their crimes and yet never be caught if they simply put the confessions in the blog portion above recipes. 

"Thanks for coming here for the recipe for my THREE RIBBON SALAD, a wonderful buffet dish or holiday item- I make it every Christmas and Cinco De Mayo for my husband's family. This is an easy-peasy sure to please-e recipe-se with just three ingredients and three simple steps, which I'll get into in a minute, but first, have I ever told you about the time I stabbed a homeless vagrant outside of Akron, Ohio just to watch him die?..."

See the source image

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

TO BE FAIR, I'VE SEEN some pretty good prints on youtube tho.

You are right, there are some good prints on YouTube, but it's also all over the map on YouTube and that's understandable with its model. TCM, which is a pay/premium channel that does, basically, one thing,  shows old movies, should have, at minimum, good prints when they are available. 

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3 minutes ago, mkahn22 said:

You are right, there are some good prints on YouTube, but it's also all over the map on YouTube and that's understandable with its model. TCM, which is a pay/premium channel that does, basically, one thing,  shows old movies, should have, at minimum, good prints when they are available. 

a lot of times it has to do with DIGITIZED VERSIONS of films, everything is broadcast digitally now, so old films have to be converted to digital format to play and maybe some of the copies they get to digitize are not the best copies/prints/etc

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OH MY GOD, are you THAT YOUNG?!

His statement that The Incredibles was his first film in the theater even made me feel old, even though I'm really not much older though than him, maybe about 6 years or so. I just feel like I have a prematurely mature soul; my tastes and preferences in movies, books, TV shows, and music are closer to a baby boomer than someone my own age (millenial generation)

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2 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

His statement that The Incredibles was his first film in the theater even made me feel old, even though I'm really not much older though than him, maybe about 6 years or so. I just feel like I have a prematurely mature soul; my tastes and preferences in movies, books, TV shows, and music are closer to a baby boomer than someone my own age (millenial generation)

maybe he just grew up like NELL in the wilderness for the first 20 or so years of his life and saw THE INCREDIBLES his first week of freedom?

Guess we'll have to wait to find out....

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Hoo boy.

For a while now, I have wanted to see LUCHINO VISCONTI'S 1969 film THE DAMNED [**and BOY are they EVER!]

I even tried to rent it on amazon this Christmas and it was sadly unavailable...

so imagine my thrill when it turned up under a rock somewhere...

Holy **** though, this movie is A LOT- but if I had to pare it down I'd say it's like watching a hybrid version of HAMLET and MACBETH and DYNASTY with CROSS-DRESSING NAZIS directed by DOUGLAS SIRK.

See the source image

I liked it, and yet I HAVE TO SAY, THERE IS CHILD ABUSE DEPICTED IN THIS FILM AND- AS SUCH- IT'S NOT ONE FOR EVERYBODY AND I CAME REALDAMNCLOSE TO TURNING IT OFF IN ONE SCENE, even though it wasn't explicit and both actors were honestly really good.

There are extended parts of this film in GERMAN with NO SUBTITLES, so I can't really say I fully understand the 30 minute long EXTENDED NAZI KIKI SESSION BY THE LAKE  that ends in the BEER HALL PUTSCH, but- um- it was engrossing.

(Sorry, my spelling is all wrong I am sure.)

DIRK BOGARDE is in this (!) and he is very good, more ELECTRIC than I have ever found him before, man, he really was one of the BRAVEST actors of the late 60s/early 70s wasn't he?

the INTERIORS and COSTUMES (and JEWELS!!!!!) are great- lots of MARCEL WAVES and PLUCKED BROWS and THE WOMEN WEAR THEIR DIAMONDS TO BED!!!!!!!!

this film is DECADENT TRASH, but it's totally okay with that, and BY THE END, God Help Me, so was I.

Excellent review, Lorna. If you can accept The Damned as decadent trash, a superior Legend of Lylah Clare, granted that almost anything is superior to Lylah Clare, parts of it are fun. Some critics have tried to take The Damned as a serious statement about Nazism. News flash: it isn't. In fact, its suggestion that homosexuality = decadence = fascism is false, offensive, and unhistorical. The SA was indeed led by an open homosexual, and look where that got him. Nazism reacted against the sexual openness of the 1920s.

But this is to take Visconti seriously as a thinker, and that is precisely what he is not. As a gay Italian Douglas Sirk, Visconti takes the drapes and the costumes seriously, but not the ideas. Sirk is actually more intelligent and thoughtful than Visconti, but the comparison stands.

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On 1/28/2022 at 11:29 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

[Meryl Streep's performance in A CRY IN THE DARK] might even be THE BEST (if anyone pulled a gun on me and demanded I name STREEP'S FINEST WORK ON THE SPOT**, it's the title I'd blurt out without hesitation.)

[Keeping in mind that I haven't seen IRONWEED or some of her more recent endeavors]

she strikes a perfect balance of [incredible] TECHNICAL ACTING with [multifaceted] EMOTIONAL ACTING, it's a REAL PERFORMANCE and one HELL of a challenging part.

You summed up perfectly what makes Meryl Streep's work in A CRY IN THE DARK one of the greatest acting performances recorded on film.  If I had to name Streep's best movie performance, my choice would also be A CRY IN THE DARK.   Her work in SILKWOOD would be my second choice.

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On 1/29/2022 at 6:04 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

now let’s play the theme: “🎶me me me me me me MEEEEEEE🎶

 

On 1/29/2022 at 6:05 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

We truly have become the most solipsistic society in history.

YES.

. . . and YES.

My biggest  peeve along this line is when someone  sets up a camera to record their reactions as they watch a movie  or listen to a song and then upload the video on  You Tube as "MY Reaction to Watching  THE SHINING for the First Time"  or "MY Reaction to Hearing  Celine Dion's 'My Heart Will Go On'' for the First Time."

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

maybe he just grew up like NELL in the wilderness for the first 20 or so years of his life and saw THE INCREDIBLES his first week of freedom?

Guess we'll have to wait to find out....

Well, that movie is nearly 20 years old at this point - old enough that there's at least one generation that only knows it from watching it on home video of one sort or another.

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7 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

 

YES.

. . . and YES.

My biggest  peeve along this line is when someone  sets up a camera to record their reactions as they watch a movie  or listen to a song and then upload the video on  You Tube as "MY Reaction to Watching  THE SHINING for the First Time"  or "MY Reaction to Hearing  Celine Dion's 'My Heart Will Go On'' for the First Time."

Why this became a thing I'll never know.  People watching people watching things.  There are programs on TV that have the same theme.  Gogglebox, an hour-long reality series, which airs on the UK's Channel 4 network, is exactly that.  It's been on the air since 2013, and spawned spin-offs, including a kids version, a teen/YA version (watching online content) and a celebrity version and even won a BAFTA award.  They got the idea largely from a UK scripted series, The Royle Family, a sitcom that centered on a layabout family who spend most of their time in front of the telly, from the late 90s and early 2000s.  

It spawned a US version, which ran on Bravo for 4 years.

 

 

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48 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

My biggest  peeve along this line is when someone  sets up a camera to record their reactions as they watch a movie  or listen to a song and then upload the video on  You Tube as "MY Reaction to Watching  THE SHINING for the First Time"  or "MY Reaction to Hearing  Celine Dion's 'My Heart Will Go On'' for the First Time."

First of all, you can't post it on YouTube as itself, without angering the Copyright gods of Lorna's mention.  "Fair use" means we can only see excerpts used to demonstrate some other personal statement or educational point.

Second, among their fans, the reaction IS the attraction--If you've watched the movie reactions (and not "Black fangirl watches just the 'Sherriff arrives' scene from Blazing Saddles and the Killer Bunny scene from 'Holy Grail'!" excerpts), the YouTubers are selling the fact that they're reacting to 80's/90's culture for the FIRST TIME.   

Much as we would gleefully tune in to watch someone seeing The Incredibles for the first time, and don't think such people don't exist.

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8 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

 

YES.

. . . and YES.

My biggest  peeve along this line is when someone  sets up a camera to record their reactions as they watch a movie  or listen to a song and then upload the video on  You Tube as "MY Reaction to Watching  THE SHINING for the First Time"  or "MY Reaction to Hearing  Celine Dion's 'My Heart Will Go On'' for the First Time."

I refuse to watch reaction videos (or really most people’s “look at me” videos) because I am not convinced that those are their genuine reactions. I don’t know about everyone else, but since I usually watch movies alone, my reactions are not vocalized. Then there are things I wonder about (e.g. money, so I’ll bring up the inflation calculator); but I do that quietly and pause the movie. I feel like people who are making a point to record their reactions will just think of things to say to try and be funny or outrageous. I feel like these videos are disingenuous. The only way they’d seem more realistic is if the person didn’t know they were being filmed.  And even then I wouldn’t watch, because I don’t care. 

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I Love Trouble from 1947 with Franchot Tone, Janet Blair, Janis Carter and Glenda Farrell

 
 
After Humphrey Bogart helped to define the noir private-investigator role in 1941's hit The Maltese Falcon, Hollywood did its Hollywood thing of spitting out copycat versions for years. Some were quite impressive, as when Dick Powell transformed his entire career by playing Philip Marlowe in Murder, My Sweet, but many were simply serviceable B-movie efforts like I Love Trouble.  
 
Even in a B movie, Franchot Tone is an odd choice - weak chin, reedy voice, receding hairline - for a hard-boiled detective lead, but he has enough acting chops to do an okay job in the role. Probably realizing that Tone wasn't the ideal male lead, the studio added several very attractive women to the cast. Yet, two good B-movie stars do not equal one Mary Astor (The Maltese Falcon) or Veronica Lake (The Glass Key) - actresses aren't arithmetic. 
 
Tone, though, gives it his all as the weary private investigator who is willing to get beat up a few times and risk going to jail to solve the case, the minimum requirements for a film-noir private investigator. Yet, when one pretty woman after another immediately falls for him, credibility is getting stretched a bit thin. Still, you kinda root for him to win, but what does that mean here?
 
Once you get past the only okay cast, you are left with an only okay story. As in many of these '40s noir-detective movies, the plot is too confusing to truly follow (an approach that reached its apotheosis in The Big Sleep). 
 
In I Love Trouble, a wealthy (and cranky) husband hires Tone to dig into his missing, younger and pretty wife's past, which seems to be a bunch of changed identities as she moved through nightclub jobs in a few different states. There also is a stolen $40,000 in his wife's muddled history. 
 
Thrown into this mix is a sister also looking for the absent wife as well as a former showgirl friend. At least, I think that's who they are, as I never fully sorted out everyone's connection. So, yes, you root for Tone, kinda, as you're never really certain who are the good guys and who are the bad guys in this one. 
 
All the required noirish elements are here, though, including dark streets, Art Deco architecture, a blonde siren, cigarette smoke, thugs, heavies, truncheons, guns, cops who like and cops who don't like Tone, a couple of car chases and several dead bodies. 
 
(Spoiler alert) It's not really a spoiler alert to reveal the climax, since many noir private-investigator movies end the same way. Tone assembles most of the suspects in his apartment to convince the always-a-step-or-two-behind police that he's innocent of all the murders while he exposes the real killer.
 
That's pretty much it. Cornell Pictures studio wanted to cash in on the noir private-investigator wave, so it brought together all the pieces of the popular sub-genre as best as its humble budget would allow. That resulted in an okay movie you should only watch if it happens to be on when you have an hour and a half to spare. 
 
Eventually, Hollywood uses repetition to kill every goose that lays a golden egg (and then revives it later). It didn't do this to the noir private-investigator movie with I Love Trouble, but you could tell Hollywood was starting to get there.  
 

 

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17 hours ago, mkahn22 said:

TCM, which is a pay/premium channel that does, basically, one thing,  shows old movies, should have, at minimum, good prints when they are available. 

Back in the old days when they sent physical media, often the wrong version print would be sent by mistake. Wondering if there's a "rights" difference in the restored/unrestored versions & that's all TCM can get.

15 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Why this became a thing I'll never know.  People watching people watching things

Ugh. I recently saw a cute, smart 5 year old relative for the first time since lockdown and could not believe he was glued to a laptop watching OTHER KIDS PLAY. On a playground, with toys, building blocks, etc. I see obesity in his future.

Although, is it much different from reading a book or watching a movie? We're just sitting around while Cary Grant climbs Mt Rushmore on a screen the same way the kids watch other kids play. 

Maybe what I object to is how "small" the subject is...watching a story set in Scotland inspires me to go there, a cowboy movie might ignite a desire to take riding lessons...what we read/view as passive entertainment can open our minds to expand our real lives. How many of us have changed our mind/seem multiple sides of controversial issues by watching a movie about it? 

Watching someone open a box or react to a song is so individual, it teaches us little. I'm not interested in (virtual) individuals personal lives in contrast to being very interested in movie stars. They told us stories we emotionally relate with.

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46 minutes ago, mkahn22 said:

ilovetrouble1947.78829.thumb.jpg.76145b6f5b2f305544756c608e9dc494.jpg

 

I Love Trouble from 1947 with Franchot Tone, Janet Blair, Janis Carter and Glenda Farrell

 

 

The poster artwork with its see through upper wear on Janet Blair is considerably more interesting than the film itself. And, forget it, folks, the lady wears nothing like this in the film (but, then, you fans of noir during the production code era knew that anyway). Still, I must confess to a little surprise that the studio got away with this kind of poster at the time.

Original I Love Trouble (1947) movie poster in NM condition for $1800.00

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20 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Hoo boy.

For a while now, I have wanted to see LUCHINO VISCONTI'S 1969 film THE DAMNED [**and BOY are they EVER!]

I even tried to rent it on amazon this Christmas and it was sadly unavailable...

so imagine my thrill when it turned up under a rock somewhere...

Holy **** though, this movie is A LOT- but if I had to pare it down I'd say it's like watching a hybrid version of HAMLET and MACBETH and DYNASTY with CROSS-DRESSING NAZIS directed by DOUGLAS SIRK.

See the source image

I liked it, and yet I HAVE TO SAY, THERE IS CHILD ABUSE DEPICTED IN THIS FILM AND- AS SUCH- IT'S NOT ONE FOR EVERYBODY AND I CAME REALDAMNCLOSE TO TURNING IT OFF IN ONE SCENE, even though it wasn't explicit and both actors were honestly really good.

There are extended parts of this film in GERMAN with NO SUBTITLES, so I can't really say I fully understand the 30 minute long EXTENDED NAZI KIKI SESSION BY THE LAKE  that ends in the BEER HALL PUTSCH, but- um- it was engrossing.

(Sorry, my spelling is all wrong I am sure.)

DIRK BOGARDE is in this (!) and he is very good, more ELECTRIC than I have ever found him before, man, he really was one of the BRAVEST actors of the late 60s/early 70s wasn't he?

the INTERIORS and COSTUMES (and JEWELS!!!!!) are great- lots of MARCEL WAVES and PLUCKED BROWS and THE WOMEN WEAR THEIR DIAMONDS TO BED!!!!!!!!

this film is DECADENT TRASH, but it's totally okay with that, and BY THE END, God Help Me, so was I.

I've wanted to see this film for so long. TCM had scheduled it at LEAST once and pulled it! :(

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36 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I've wanted to see [THE DAMNED] for so long. TCM had scheduled it at LEAST once and pulled it! :(

I kinda understand why.

Not for the Nazis or the gay stuff or the Nazi gay stuff or even the incest, but for one VERY DISTURBING SCENE where the protagonist of the film (an amoral German Baronet in his twenties) caresses an 11(ish) year old girl (and it leads to an offscreen rape). it's a running theme through the first part of the film that this character is a child molester, but it's mostly handled OFFSCREEN in a way that is actually quite effective...except for this one scene, which almost caused ME to turn off the film (and I've seen some crazy stuff.)

honestly, I think it was a mistake of VISCONTI to include it. (even though it's not badly filmed and both the actors are honestly really good, sick as that may be to say.)

I've been thinking about THE DAMNED since I saw it, because it is interesting and deserves to be seen, but on a personal level, I would actually make the controversial choice of COMPLETELY REMOVING the five minute scene that takes things "too far" which, I know is SACRILEDGE to cineastes AND ARTISTS. but...really, it doesn't need to be there AND IT MOST DEFINITELY DOES NOT HELP THE FILM.

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i just remembered...one more thing in re: THE DAMNED (1969)....

The film's most engaging performance- by far- is given by REINHARD KOLLDEHOFF as a warmongering abrasive, crass Uncle and member of the SA...HONESTLY, it was like watching  GEORGE C. SCOTT'S GERMAN DOPPELGANGER, and it is (as you can imagine) HIGHLY AMUSING.

"Genau wie das Braten von Hühnern auf einem Bauernhof!"

See the source image

 

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Watching someone open a box or react to a song is so individual, it teaches us little. I'm not interested in (virtual) individuals personal lives in contrast to being very interested in movie stars. They told us stories we emotionally relate with.

Let's put it this way:  One of the popular reactors on YouTube is a couple that watches movies the husband has seen and the wife hasn't.  We see the expression on his face as we know what he knows, and she doesn't...  😈

Which is particularly fun when they're reacting to an infamously bad movie:

...Oh, fer fun.  😇

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Didn't know until this thread that "Reaction Videos" were actually something that existed. In addition to being a bit ostentatious, wouldn't it be a little hard to capture hearing a song for the first time on camera? Suppose you are in a car either as a driver or a passenger and some wonderful song you never heard before appears on the radio. It would be pretty hard to whip out a phone mid-song and try to capture it that way.

I don't know. If I have a reaction to seeing a film for the first time, I'll post it here in this thread and sometimes on my personal page at Letterboxd (A film review and tracking site, much more user friendly than IMDb in keeping track of what you have seen). We're all a pretty tight knit group on this website, so posting a reaction to a film here is just simply like informing some close friends or pen pals about a film. Not like YouTube where you are potentially telling half the world.  The only difficulty posting about films here is that sometimes it is hard to really write  about a film for one reason or another. For example, if using some of the last few films I saw as an example, it would be noted that one (1960's The Time Machine) was purely entertaining, exhilarating, and pleasing and another (1942's The Pied Piper) is a wonderful film. Its sometimes hard to write a review of a film you really like; sometimes writing superlatives gets repetitive. On the other hand, you don't want to be too glum; another film I saw (2020's French Exit) was such a weird little chamber piece (concerning depression, premonitions, ennui, seances, and cross-species reincarnation) that was so slow at times that it was hard to get involved, although Valerie Mulhaffey was delightful in a supporting part, stealing the show from a surprisingly bitter Michelle Pfeiffer (I only watched it because of Pfeiffer in the first place), and I didn't have the desire to write a full review.

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