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speedracer5
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15 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I never saw Magnolia. TOM CRUISE makes me retch. 

I agree.  I gave up on Cruise after Top Gun, which was a silly movie, but his acting was terrible.

Incidentally, I am a big fan of the Jack Reacher novels, but absolutely no way Tom Cruise can be Jack Reacher - none.

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Been enjoying the Ida Lupino collection over on Criterion.  So far I've watched:

They Drive By Night (1940)

Out of the Fog (1941)

The Sea Wolf (1941)

Moontide (1942)

While the City Sleeps (1956)

Have enjoyed them all.  Good to see Thomas Mitchell in a leading role in Out of the Fog.

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3 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

Been enjoying the Ida Lupino collection over on Criterion.  So far I've watched:

They Drive By Night (1940)

Out of the Fog (1941)

The Sea Wolf (1941)

Moontide (1942)

While the City Sleeps (1956)

Have enjoyed them all.  Good to see Thomas Mitchell in a leading role in Out of the Fog.

That's an excellent bunch of movies you watched.  I've seen them all, but only saw "Moontide" and "The Sea Wolf" in the past year - impressive pictures. 

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19 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

Been enjoying the Ida Lupino collection over on Criterion.  So far I've watched:

They Drive By Night (1940)

Out of the Fog (1941)

The Sea Wolf (1941)

Moontide (1942)

While the City Sleeps (1956)

Have enjoyed them all.  Good to see Thomas Mitchell in a leading role in Out of the Fog.

I haven't watched The Sea Wolf yet, but it's on my DVR.  I really enjoy all the other films you listed.  I really wish that Criterion could have included Beware My Lovely with Ida and Robert Ryan.  I saw that movie a few years ago on TCM and haven't seen it since.  I loved that movie.  I wish that I had saved my recording of the movie, because it's not available on DVD/Blu Ray.  This seems like the type of movie that Kino would release, so I am holding out hope.  Lol.

Ida is also really great in The Hard Way that I believe is also included in the Criterion spotlight.   I also liked The Big Knife, despite Rod Steiger's overacting. 

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53 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I haven't watched The Sea Wolf yet, but it's on my DVR.  I really enjoy all the other films you listed.  I really wish that Criterion could have included Beware My Lovely with Ida and Robert Ryan.  I saw that movie a few years ago on TCM and haven't seen it since.  I loved that movie.  I wish that I had saved my recording of the movie, because it's not available on DVD/Blu Ray.  This seems like the type of movie that Kino would release, so I am holding out hope.  Lol.

Ida is also really great in The Hard Way that I believe is also included in the Criterion spotlight.   I also liked The Big Knife, despite Rod Steiger's overacting. 

!!!

You haven’t seen THE SEA WOLF?!

it’s very good- EDWARD G ROBINSON gets to do a variation on CAPTAIN BLIGH and is- of course- superb. It’s very well shot, and the supporting cast is terrific, and the love story between Ida Luppino and John Garfield, while secondary to the villainous  antics of Robinson, is still really engrossing. And Alexander Knox is much better in this movie then he was in his later Oscar-nominated performance in WILSON

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Also, for a couple of years I have been searching high and low for a screen directors play house radio adaptation of “the sea wolf” starring Boris Karloff in the Edward G Robinson role. I’m not sure if it no longer exists, but I can never find it in all the collections of screen directors Playhouse eps. that are online – and since the whole series is in the public domain I can only imagine maybe the recording was damaged or lost.

Just for funsies, does anyone out there know where a recording might be found?

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42 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Also, for a couple of years I have been searching high and low for a screen directors play house radio adaptation of “the sea wolf” starring Boris Karloff in the Edward G Robinson role. I’m not sure if it no longer exists, but I can never find it in all the collections of screen directors Playhouse eps. that are online – and since the whole series is in the public domain I can only imagine maybe the recording was damaged or lost.

Just for funsies, does anyone out there know where a recording might be found?

This is the playlist on Youtube.  The Sea Wolf is #54

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44 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Also, for a couple of years I have been searching high and low for a screen directors play house radio adaptation of “the sea wolf” starring Boris Karloff in the Edward G Robinson role. I’m not sure if it no longer exists, but I can never find it in all the collections of screen directors Playhouse eps. that are online – and since the whole series is in the public domain I can only imagine maybe the recording was damaged or lost.

Just for funsies, does anyone out there know where a recording might be found?

Sorry, that link to the playlist didn't work.  Here's the link to The Sea Wolf.

 

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13 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

This is the playlist on Youtube.  The Sea Wolf is #54

This is the version with ROBINSON, and it’s terrific – maybe even a little better than the film because it’s condensed down.

I’m talking about another episode though.

Apparently there was a rebroadcast of “the Sea Wolf” and it featured Boris Karloff in the part-I know because It is advertised (“tune in next week”) at the end of an episode that I listen to a lot, (I want to say it’s their adaptation of “the damned don’t cry,” but I might very well be wrong about that. Maybe it’s THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE?)

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Also, for a couple of years I have been searching high and low for a screen directors play house radio adaptation of “the sea wolf” starring Boris Karloff in the Edward G Robinson role. I’m not sure if it no longer exists, but I can never find it in all the collections of screen directors Playhouse eps. that are online – and since the whole series is in the public domain I can only imagine maybe the recording was damaged or lost.

Just for funsies, does anyone out there know where a recording might be found?

And I should read your posts more carefully.  You want the Boris Karloff version.

The Boris Karloff radio version of The Sea Wolf was actually The Theatre Guild on the Air program or The U.S. Steel Hour (the sponsor), not Screen Director's Playhouse.

It still exists. There was a set of 16" transcription discs for sale on EBay a few years ago.

 

https://www.popsike.com/Four-16-Transcription-Record-Acetate-Radio-Drama-The-Seawolf-1950-NBC-Karloff/151758880338.html

.

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3 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

And I should read your posts more carefully.  You want the Boris Karloff version.

The Boris Karloff radio version of The Sea Wolf was actually The Theatre Guild on the Air program or The U.S. Steel Hour (the sponsor), not Screen Director's Playhouse.

It still exists. There was a set of 16" transcription discs for sale on EBay a few years ago.

 

 

.

HA! You beat me to it, I just went to google and was getting ready to post the same thing.

the few radio appearances of Boris Karloff’s that still exist sre excellent, he was *such* a good radio performer. I would absolutely love to be able to hear his version of the Sea Wolf.

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nomanofherown1950.85108.jpg

 

No Man of Her Own from 1950 with Barbara Stanwyck, John Lund, Jane Cowl, Lyle Bettger and Henry O'Neill

 
 
No Man of Her Own is a soap opera noir with an almost comically unbelievable plot that works because of the impressive talents of the actors and director.
 
Barbara Stanwyck plays a single and pregnant woman (tsk-tsk) tossed aside by the baby's father, Lyle Bettger, with nothing more than a train ticket to the other coast and five bucks. The train crashes, killing a pregnant newlywed, played by the always wonderful Phyllis Thaxter, and her husband. 
 
When Stanwyck wakes up in the hospital, she realizes, one, her baby was born and is fine, two, she's been mistakenly identified as the newlywed and, three, "her" wealthy in-laws are providing for her care.
 
The in-laws invite her and her baby, what they believe is their grandson, to come live with them, which Stanwyck does. These very nice people, played by Henry O'Neill and Jane Cowl, immediately embrace Stanwyck and their grandson. Since they never met their son's new bride before, they dismiss any confusion and inconsistencies in Stanwyck as being the result of shock from the accident. 
 
The family's other son, played by John Lund, also a nice guy, seems to be suspicious of Stanwyck, but doesn't say anything. Stanwyck loves her new life, but feels guilt over fooling the family and is fearful she'll be exposed. 
 
Just as things are settling in nicely and Lund begins to awkwardly court the living-under-the-same-roof Stanwyck ("sorry your husband, my brother, died, but what are you doing Saturday night?"), Stanwyck's former boyfriend, who left her flat when she was pregnant, Lyle Bettger, shows up with blackmail on his mind. 
 
From here, the take-it-with-a-grain-of-salt story twists itself into knots with wills, bank accounts, a forced marriage, an incriminating check, guns, murder, a disposed of body, last-minute and from-the-grave potentially exculpatory evidence and much angst.
 
Yet you go along for the ride because Barbara Stanwyck, with the possible exception of Bette Davis (when she had the right looks for the role), is the only actress who could fireman carry the unbelievable plot over all its bumps and holes. 
 
Stanwyck credibly portrays, first, a down-and-out single mother, then, a lucky but anxious doppelganger daughter-in-law and, finally, a woman desperate enough to contemplate murder. Her emotions and facial expressions credibly shift gears, time and again and on the fly, which has you rooting for her all along. 
 
While it's Stanwyck's movie, Cowl, as the kind and smart mother-in-law, and Lund, as the brother-in-law who sees through Stanwyck's story, bring much-needed warmth and understanding. But it's Bettger, as the oleaginous ex-boyfriend blackmailer, who gives the movie both its tensest noir moments and an antagonist equal to Stanwyck.
 
Even with its outstanding acting talent, No Man of Her Own wouldn't work if director Mitchell Leisen didn't know how to usher the story past its holes by getting the viewer deeply vested in the characters. 
 
He also amps up the noir by pitch-perfectly juxtaposing the calm and comfortable life of Stanwyck's new upper-class family with the desperation and impoverishment of her former life and ex-boyfriend. 
 
No Man of Her Own's story is too messy for it to be in the pantheon of noirs, but its acting and directing are so good, it's a must-see for noir and Stanwyck fans. It's also an atypical but fun blend of soap suds and noir that ricochets your emotions all over the place.
 
  
 
 
 

 

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2 hours ago, Fading Fast said:

nomanofherown1950.85108.jpg

 

No Man of Her Own from 1950 with Barbara Stanwyck, John Lund, Jane Cowl, Lyle Bettger and Henry O'Neill

 
 
No Man of Her Own is a soap opera noir with an almost comically unbelievable plot that works because of the impressive talents of the actors and director.
 
Barbara Stanwyck plays a single and pregnant woman (tsk-tsk) tossed aside by the baby's father, Lyle Bettger, with nothing more than a train ticket to the other coast and five bucks. The train crashes, killing a pregnant newlywed, played by the always wonderful Phyllis Thaxter, and her husband. 
 
When Stanwyck wakes up in the hospital, she realizes, one, her baby was born and is fine, two, she's been mistakenly identified as the newlywed and, three, "her" wealthy in-laws are providing for her care.
 
The in-laws invite her and her baby, what they believe is their grandson, to come live with them, which Stanwyck does. These very nice people, played by Henry O'Neill and Jane Cowl, immediately embrace Stanwyck and their grandson. Since they never met their son's new bride before, they dismiss any confusion and inconsistencies in Stanwyck as being the result of shock from the accident. 
 
The family's other son, played by John Lund, also a nice guy, seems to be suspicious of Stanwyck, but doesn't say anything. Stanwyck loves her new life, but feels guilt over fooling the family and is fearful she'll be exposed. 
 
Just as things are settling in nicely and Lund begins to awkwardly court the living-under-the-same-roof Stanwyck ("sorry your husband, my brother, died, but what are you doing Saturday night?"), Stanwyck's former boyfriend, who left her flat when she was pregnant, Lyle Bettger, shows up with blackmail on his mind. 
 
From here, the take-it-with-a-grain-of-salt story twists itself into knots with wills, bank accounts, a forced marriage, an incriminating check, guns, murder, a disposed of body, last-minute and from-the-grave potentially exculpatory evidence and much angst.
 
Yet you go along for the ride because Barbara Stanwyck, with the possible exception of Bette Davis (when she had the right looks for the role), is the only actress who could fireman carry the unbelievable plot over all its bumps and holes. 
 
Stanwyck credibly portrays, first, a down-and-out single mother, then, a lucky but anxious doppelganger daughter-in-law and, finally, a woman desperate enough to contemplate murder. Her emotions and facial expressions credibly shift gears, time and again and on the fly, which has you rooting for her all along. 
 
While it's Stanwyck's movie, Cowl, as the kind and smart mother-in-law, and Lund, as the brother-in-law who sees through Stanwyck's story, bring much-needed warmth and understanding. But it's Bettger, as the oleaginous ex-boyfriend blackmailer, who gives the movie both its tensest noir moments and an antagonist equal to Stanwyck.
 
Even with its outstanding acting talent, No Man of Her Own wouldn't work if director Mitchell Leisen didn't know how to usher the story past its holes by getting the viewer deeply vested in the characters. 
 
He also amps up the noir by pitch-perfectly juxtaposing the calm and comfortable life of Stanwyck's new upper-class family with the desperation and impoverishment of her former life and ex-boyfriend. 
 
No Man of Her Own's story is too messy for it to be in the pantheon of noirs, but its acting and directing are so good, it's a must-see for noir and Stanwyck fans. It's also an atypical but fun blend of soap suds and noir that ricochets your emotions all over the place.
 
  
 
 
 

 

RE: "NO MAN OF HER OWN" (1950)

I FEEL REALLY GUILTY ABOUT THIS ONE.

I have been begging TCM to show this FOR YEARS and I was scrolling through WATCH TCM and saw where they FINALLY AIRED IT, and I meant to thank them and watch it (or re-watch it, i should say- thing is, I own the film on DVD)- but i did not.

I really like this movie quite  a bit- in many ways, it's a little like watching STANWYCK play JOAN CRAWFORD as she adopts the CRAWFORD DEATHMASK in a couple of the scenes.

I also love PHYLLIS COWL.

This film is based on a dark and somewhat ponderous novel by CORNELL WOOLRICH  called I MARRIED A DEAD MAN, the first lines of the screenplay (spoken in narration by STANWYCK) about the HELIOTROPE and other blooming plants in the neighborhood lawns is lifted directly from the first lines of the novel.

thanks TCM for showing this, I did not mean to be a TOTAL RAT BASTARD and not thank you guys for for acquiring it.

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18 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

... it's a little like watching STANWYCK play JOAN CRAWFORD as she adopts the CRAWFORD DEATHMASK in a couple of the scenes....

I hadn't thought of that, but you're spot on.

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3 minutes ago, Fading Fast said:

I hadn't thought of that, but you're spot on.

THE DAMNED DON'T CRY and NO MAN OF HER OWN both came out in 1950, and it's not hard to imagine JOAN and BARBARA in each other's parts.

(they'd make a great double feature too!)

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE DAMNED DON'T CRY and NO MAN OF HER OWN both came out in 1950, and it's not hard to imagine JOAN and BARBARA in each other's parts.

(they'd make a great double feature too!)

I would love a Joan Crawford / Barbara Stanwyck noir or melodrama. I don’t even know what it’d be about, but I’m here for it. 

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On 5/18/2022 at 12:04 PM, ElCid said:

I agree.  I gave up on Cruise after Top Gun, which was a silly movie, but his acting was terrible.

Incidentally, I am a big fan of the Jack Reacher novels, but absolutely no way Tom Cruise can be Jack Reacher - none.

As a matter of bleak record on the decline of films, a sequel to Top Gun, 36 years later, again with Tom Cruise, received a five minute standing ovation at the Cannes film Festival. It feels almost obscene, especially given that the first film was a half-hearted recruiting poster filled with stock leftovers from WWII films.

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

As a matter of bleak record on the decline of films, a sequel to Top Gun, 36 years later, again with Tom Cruise, received a five minute standing ovation at the Cannes film Festival. It feels almost obscene, especially given that the first film was a half-hearted recruiting poster filled with stock leftovers from WWII films.

Never been impressed with the Cannes Film Festival.

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2 hours ago, ElCid said:

Never been impressed with the Cannes Film Festival.

You been there?     I have and it was a worthwhile experience.       Not so much because of the films but the entire setting and vibe.

 

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A Rainy Day in New York (2019)

I enjoyed this film. It's certainly not top tier Woody Allen, but it has charm and some very funny lines, and I appreciate its paean to New York City. Part of the plot, concerning a ditsy young woman (Elle Fanning) coming to the big city with her boyfriend and being distracted by celebrities,  echoes The White Sheik, perhaps my favorite Fellini film. But it's Timothee Chalamet's film, and he's pretty good. He has a scene with Cherry Jones, who plays his mother, which comes out of the blue and is really well done: funny and touching. One of the better films from Allen's later period.

1308816_rainydayinnewyrok_72206.jpg

a-rainy-day-in-new-york-lg.jpg

Cherry Jones

 

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Lady on a Train.

Cute little movie. Didn't think comedy crossed with noir(although it wasn't very noir-ish to me)would be enjoyable, but it was a fun way to pass an evening. 
 

Deanna Durbin a very appealing young woman, and character was too. Oh, and boy could she could sing!

Ralph Bellamy handsome but I don't think he was a good fit for his part.  Or maybe it was the other way around.

Edward Everett Horton a blast to watch as always.

 

933F725E-CC5B-494B-B6F6-BC3C47060289.jpeg

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Things Happen at Night (1948)

 

An English country gentleman has a daughter who is boy crazy, a wife who hears things in the night and a millionaire visiting to close a big business deal. What a time for the house poltergeist to start acting up!

I was quite surprised to learn that this was made in 1948. It has all the looks and feel of an early 1930s comedy-mystery. The primary special effects are floating vases and that was done quite well. 

None of the cast had brilliant careers but character actors: Robertson Hare and: Wylie Watson deliver the sound performances for which they are known.

This is a delightful bit of fluff if you apply the standards expected fifteen years prior to its production.

5.4/10

This movie is available for viewing free with commercials on: TubiTV 

 

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Journey's End (1930)

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I was just blown away by this film. War films are not usually my favorite, but I really am absorbed by ones that focus on the deep platonic bond that forms between soldiers.

Colin Clive was excellent as Capt. Stanhope. Even though Stanhope is a hard man made more callous by the war, there are several points in the film where cracks in that shell appear and this beautiful humanness beneath shows through. For example, I love the scene where he and Lt. Hibbert fight over letting the latter leave the front. You are given the impression that Stanhope will legitimately shoot his fellow officer, but he doesn't and instead shows so much compassion by admitting to his own fears and reliance on alcohol to get him through the distress he feels every day. His offer to go on duty alongside Hibbert was quite touching. Clive played a tortured soul with such sincerity that really made me feel a lot of compassion for his character, as well as for the actor himself who struggled with alcoholism in his own life. I really want to watch more of his movies now.

David Manners was great in the film as well, playing the over-eager, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed young newcomer to the outfit. Have you ever seen an actor onscreen and all the sudden are just so intrigued by them? I feel that way about David Manners. There is just something about him I like, but I can't put my finger on it. He has a certain presence, I guess.

Next on my list is to watch the German version, Die andere Seite (1931). I'd love to know the story behind how this film was made, as it is really unique for a film to be made about the opposite side in a war and to portray them as real, likable human beings. That's such a beautiful thing.

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