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I just watched EDOUARD ET CAROLINE (1951).  I wasn't expecting this scene for a film from the early 1950's. So probably no Production Code for France at that time.

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9 hours ago, noah80 said:

I just watched EDOUARD ET CAROLINE (1951).  I wasn't expecting this scene for a film from the early 1950's. So probably no Production Code for France at that time.

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Dustin Hoffman in a diaper?

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Downton Abbey: A New Era (2022)  It’s 1928, and the Crawley family is dealing with two matters that has them very stressed: A film company has asked to use the abbey to shoot a movie, and Countess Violet comes into the possession of a villa on the French Riviera.  The former, initially dismissed because movie people, after all, are drunk hedonists, turns out not such a difficult decision, once the family finds out how much money the film company will pay for allowing use of the estate.  The other is a much bigger crisis because the villa was bequeathed to Countess Violet from a French nobleman who may have been her lover a long time ago.  And that means the Frenchman could be Lord Grantham’s father. Oh, how scandalous! Violet, we thought we knew you!

Julian Fellowes’ screenplay is very generous. Every character gets a chance to tell part of their story. The new additions to the cast work out nicely. Dominic West plays a Ronald Coleman-type leading man with a secret. Laura Haddock is a sexy but petulant silent film star terrified the sound era will slam the door shut on her career.  And the director of the movie within the movie (Hugh Dancy) forms a bond with Lady Mary, whose husband is away, and the temptation tests Mary’s iron will.  In summary, it’s everything fans loved about the show.  In this age of hyper narcissism and vulgarity for profit, the Downton world is quite refreshing.

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The Riverside Murder (1935)

 

A female reporter was the last visitor of a wealthy old gentleman who is later found dead. She then finds that the inspector in charge of the investigation is a suitable beau for her.

This is a 1935 movie with all the aesthetics of a mid-1930s lighthearted murder mystery. It has several plot points which are relatively unique. This elevates it in its genre. I urge all to not read the blurb at: IMDb.com because it contains a spoiler for one of the unusual features. It is a nice little surprise if unexpected.

Basil Sydney is a solid leading man who fell shy of achieving great things. Judy Gunn was competent and believable in her role. She seems to have only flirted with being an actress as she was in a dozen movies within a four year period and then disappeared from the screen forever.

IMDb.com lists this as the first movie of: Alastair Sim. He plays a police sergeant who seems to have grown old in his job. He seems much more world-weary and looks much older than the inspector he serves.

7.9/10


 

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2 hours ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Downton Abbey: A New Era (2022)  . . .

On the NPR show Morning Edition, film critic Kenneth Turan stated that if you didn't watch the TV series, then A New Era was not a good starting point because you'd be clueless about the histories of the characters and wouldn't know what was going on.

Piffle!

I never watched (and don't watch) the TV series Downton Abbey, and I didn't have any problem following -- and enjoying -- the latest adventures of the Crawley household.

Full marks to composer John Lunn for his beautiful, grand, lush, symphonic musical score!

I found Michelle Dockery (as soignée Lady Mary Crawley) elegantly sexy and Elizabeth McGovern (as Cora Granthan) extremely cadaverous.

As Turan expressed in his NPR review, Downton Abbey: A New Era channels Singing in the Rain during the subplot about the distressing invasion of "the talkies."

The only "wrong" note, as far as I'm concerned, in this otherwise engaging installment is a clumsy albeit quotable line of dialogue uttered by the "Dowager Countess of Grantham" (Dame Maggie Smith) during a melodramatic moment.

A special treat for "classic" Hollywood film fans: Several characters go to the cinema to watch the second all-talking motion picture: The Terror. No clips of that 1928 chiller-diller are shown, alas. But, I got a thrill out of seeing a movie poster (not an original) adorned with the names May McAvoy and Louise Fazenda.

For me, Downton Abbey: A New Era is a much welcome alternative to the puerile crud being churned out by Hollywood and a delightful tonic for what ails at least this cinéaste -- videlicet, starvation because of a dearth of movies made for, catering to, and about adults!

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5 hours ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Downton Abbey: A New Era (2022)  It’s 1928, and the Crawley family is dealing with two matters that has them very stressed: A film company has asked to use the abbey to shoot a movie, and Countess Violet comes into the possession of a villa on the French Riviera.  The former, initially dismissed because movie people, after all, are drunk hedonists, turns out not such a difficult decision, once the family finds out how much money the film company will pay for allowing use of the estate.  The other is a much bigger crisis because the villa was bequeathed to Countess Violet from a French nobleman who may have been her lover a long time ago.  And that means the Frenchman could be Lord Grantham’s father. Oh, how scandalous! Violet, we thought we knew you!

Julian Fellowes’ screenplay is very generous. Every character gets a chance to tell part of their story. The new additions to the cast work out nicely. Dominic West plays a Ronald Coleman-type leading man with a secret. Laura Haddock is a sexy but petulant silent film star terrified the sound era will slam the door shut on her career.  And the director of the movie within the movie (Hugh Dancy) forms a bond with Lady Mary, whose husband is away, and the temptation tests Mary’s iron will.  In summary, it’s everything fans loved about the show.  In this age of hyper narcissism and vulgarity for profit, the Downton world is quite refreshing.

its a good film. I went to go see it on Sunday, the first time that I was in a theatre since December 2019.

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Chandu the Magician (1932)

Wild, over the top sci fi-adventure tale set in Egypt, an adaption of a popular radio broadcast. Edmund Lowe plays the title character, an at times turban and flowing robe wearing yogi with mystic powers who challenges the devious super villain mad man Roxor (Bela Lugosi), and his plan for world domination with a super dooper x-ray machine with which he plans to destroy major cities.

Chandu the Magician (1932) | Alex on Film

This serial-like melodrama from Fox will be a treat for those into fantasy who don't give a hoot about logic. Chandu can hypnotize people into believing anything he wills them to believe, including turning rifles into deadly snakes. He can walk on fire, astral travel and create illusions of himself as a double working as a distraction while the real Chandu grabs a heroine in distress or makes an escape. There will be a slave auction involving a delectable young white woman before a mob of creepy looking lusting Arabs (fate worse than death for her here, do doubt).

Chandu the Magician (1932) - IMDb

Star of the show in many ways is co-director William Cameron Menzies, who worked on the fantastic sets (even if miniature in many cases) complimented by the often gliding camerawork of James Wong Howe. The mysterious exotic sounding musical score would be re-used by the studio (effectively) three years later for Charlie Chan in Egypt, one of the best, certainly most atmospheric, entries in the detective series.

CHANDU THE MAGICIAN (1932) – Blu-ray Review – ZekeFilm

Edmund Lowe, while suitably distinguished and matinee idol handsome, is perhaps a bit too subdued as Chandu, a role that calls for a larger than life screen presence. That larger than life character, though, is provided in spades by Bela Lugosi in one of his most scenery chewing, over the top portrayals.

He will have a megalomaniacal speech about world conquest towards the end which it's apparent the Hungarian actor relishes. Lugosi gloriously stretches out each syllable as he pops his eyes in his proclamation of world domination. No time for subtlety here in a portrayal that can be seen as a forerunner of James Bond villains three decades later. If Lugosi doesn't have quite as much screen time in this film as his fans would ideally like he at least makes every scene in which he appears count. Roxor is Lugosi at the peak of his powers as a dominating screen presence.

Chandu the magician - Roxor (Bela Lugosi) - YouTube

Attractive Irene Ware plays a princess Chandu comes to love and later rescues and she's quite good in her window dressing role. Herbert Mundin appears as comedy relief but he's really isn't necessary. As long as the fast moving Chandu the Magician blasts us with its grand sets with miniature work, superior camerawork and photography and that memorable Lugosi villainy, it's a fun fantasy melodramatic ride. Two years after this film was made there would be a serial, Return of Chandu, this time featuring Lugosi as the title character.

Since this film is from Fox it's doubtful it will appear on TCM. However, there's a very nice looking print of Chandu the Magician currently on You Tube. Give yourself a treat and take a look at one of the better pulpy melodramas produced in Hollywood during the '30s.

Chandu the Magician (1932) - Photo Gallery - IMDb

2.5 out of 4

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bear with me, this is one of those where I may wander off the reservation...

night before night before last i had a migraine, and they always scramble my brain in a way that is hard to describe...in the days after though, i am oddly hyper-sensitive and not entirely in a bad way- i can actually watch things with an intensity that i lack when i am not sitting completely still because my brain is essentially tapioca pudding.)

See the source image

so, the thought just popped into me head as I was in the chair yesterday afternoon "I want to watch SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS" and I went to AMAZON and it was only .99 to rent, so I did it.

and i'm glad i did.

See the source image

it's reaffirming, with mankind in its current sorry state, to sit down and see what a collective of truly gifted and inspired  artists- likely hopped up on Mexican caffeine pills and possibly chained to their desks- can create. men and women- designing the backgrounds, coming up with the concepts, applying actual make-up to SNOW WHITE'S CHEEKS in each cel [yes, they did that] animating every twist and turn of every  little leaf spiraling in the breeze as the titular heroine flees through THE HAUNTED FOREST, every ripple of the pool in the WISHING WELL, even the scenes that aren't my "vibe" [ie the "SILLY SONG" scene} had me agape at the breathtaking MANPOWER and PRECISION, the COLLECTIVE EFFORT to create this MOVING WORK OF ART, this testament to THE POTENTIAL EXCELLENCE OF COLLECTIVE ARTISTIC EFFORT. 

[deeply pondered, it's enough the give AYN RAND the DRY HEAVES like I had Wednesday Night, and the thought of that alone is worth the ninety-nine cents]

if i recall correctly, SNOW WHITE was re-released in theaters ca. 1983 and i had the privilege of experiencing it in a world not at all unlike when it was first released- at least my innocence was equal to that of a child of that time...and there are indelible memories of it CARVED INTO THE CREVICES OF MY BRAIN- granted, THEY ALL have to do with THE WICKED QUEEN/WITCH- of whom i could prattle on forever in my brain-addled state, so i won't...although, I will note that I was CRUSHED when she dies in the film.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

bear with me, this is one of those where I may wander off the reservation...

night before night before last i had a migraine, and they always scramble my brain in a way that is hard to describe...in the days after though, i am oddly hyper-sensitive and not entirely in a bad way- i can actually watch things with an intensity that i lack when i am not sitting completely still because my brain is essentially tapioca pudding.)

See the source image

so, the thought just popped into me head as I was in the chair yesterday afternoon "I want to watch SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS" and I went to AMAZON and it was only .99 to rent, so I did it.

and i'm glad i did.

See the source image

it's reaffirming, with mankind in its current sorry state, to sit down and see what a collective of truly gifted and inspired  artists- likely hopped up on Mexican caffeine pills and possibly chained to their desks- can create. men and women- designing the backgrounds, coming up with the concepts, applying actual make-up to SNOW WHITE'S CHEEKS in each cel [yes, they did that] animating every twist and turn of every  little leaf spiraling in the breeze as the titular heroine flees through THE HAUNTED FOREST, every ripple of the pool in the WISHING WELL, even the scenes that aren't my "vibe" [ie the "SILLY SONG" scene} had me agape at the breathtaking MANPOWER and PRECISION, the COLLECTIVE EFFORT to create this MOVING WORK OF ART, this testament to THE POTENTIAL EXCELLENCE OF COLLECTIVE ARTISTIC EFFORT. 

[deeply pondered, it's enough the give AYN RAND the DRY HEAVES like I had Wednesday Night, and the thought of that alone is worth the ninety-nine cents]

if i recall correctly, SNOW WHITE was re-released in theaters ca. 1983 and i had the privilege of experiencing it in a world not at all unlike when it was first released- at least my innocence was equal to that of a child of that time...and there are indelible memories of it CARVED INTO THE CREVICES OF MY BRAIN- granted, THEY ALL have to do with THE WICKED QUEEN/WITCH- of whom i could prattle on forever in my brain-addled state, so i won't...although, I will note that I was CRUSHED when she dies in the film.

See the source image

 

 

 

I also love Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. What an inspired choice. Hope you are feeling much better now.

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4 minutes ago, King Rat said:

I also love Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. What an inspired choice. Hope you are feeling much better now.

thank you. sometimes the migraine hangover is worse than the migraine.

this is one of those times.

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one minor complaint in re: SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS tho...

charming as the notion is, inviting THE WOODLAND CREATURES INSIDE to RUB THEIR COLLECTIVE @SSES ALL OVER THE FURNITURE AND PLATES, does not in fact help in the cause of hygiene

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also when she makes THE GOOSEBERRY PIES and THE BIRDS USE THEIR LITTLE DIRTY BIRDIES FEET TO STOMP OUT A PATTERN ON THE CRUST.

it's the middle ages, you are absolutely going to kill someone with a contagious disease.

Use a FORK FOR GODSAKES.

 

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2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

one minor complaint in re: SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS tho...

charming as the notion is, inviting THE WOODLAND CREATURES INSIDE to RUB THEIR COLLECTIVE @SSES ALL OVER THE FURNITURE AND PLATES, does not in fact help in the cause of hygiene

See the source image

They were probably cleaner than the 7 miners were.  This was back before people had running hot water, and full baths were definitely not an everyday occurrence.  The original fairy tale takes place in the 16th century.   In that time, most people only bathed a couple times a year, if that.  As late as the Victorian era, it was more common to just take a quick sponge bath in the morning, even in wealthy families.  

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Snow White

When I was growing up I had the record/album/book combo that kids had back then.  We would follow along with the book while the record played and "turn the page at the sound of the bell."  We had it memorized. 

My mother was den mother to a boy scout group ( I went along with my brothers) that put on a play of Snow White using hand puppets my father (an artist) had made out of papier mache.   

All in all I think Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was the single greatest influence of my young life.  I still love to sweep things.  "Whistle While You work" runs though my head the whole time.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

They were probably cleaner than the 7 miners were.  This was back before people had running hot water, and full baths were definitely not an everyday occurrence.  The original fairy tale takes place in the 16th century.   In that time, most people only bathed a couple times a year, if that.  As late as the Victorian era, it was more common to just take a quick sponge bath in the morning, even in wealthy families.  

Fair enough.

Herein I admit that I live in SOUTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA and squirrels are a HUGE NUISANCE HERE to the point where I DISLIKE THEM IMMENSELY AND CONSIDER THEM VERMIN.

I ADMIT there are no squirrels in SNOW WHITE, but there are CHIPMUNKS- which I am 99% sure I would also harbor a murderous hatred for if the climate in which I lived was cold enough. 

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1 hour ago, AndreaDoria said:

Snow White

When I was growing up I had the record/album/book combo that kids had back then.  We would follow along with the book while the record played and "turn the page at the sound of the bell."  We had it memorized. 

My mother was den mother to a boy scout group ( I went along with my brothers) that put on a play of Snow White using hand puppets my father (an artist) had made out of papier mache.   

All in all I think Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was the single greatest influence of my young life.  I still love to sweep things.  "Whistle While You work" runs though my head the whole time.

these are some MARVELOUS illustrations from THE LITTLE GOLDEN BOOK version of DISNEY'S SNOW WHITE:

See the source image

MOTHER is WAITING....

See the source image

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57 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Fair enough.

Herein I admit that I live in SOUTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA and squirrels are a HUGE NUISANCE HERE to the point where I DISLIKE THEM IMMENSELY AND CONSIDER THEM VERMIN.

I ADMIT there are no squirrels in SNOW WHITE, but there are CHIPMUNKS- which I am 99% sure I would also harbor a murderous hatred for if the climate in which I lived was cold enough. 

I call them tree rats.  Some think they're cute, but try getting them out of your attic after they've gnawed their way through.  I also have about 1000 oak saplings in my yard thanks to the trees masting a couple of years back and the squirrels stashing them all over the place.

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56 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

See the source image

See the source image

Those look like they were done by Mary Blair.  She was responsible for the look of the Pepsi-Cola's UNICEF attraction at the 1964-65 NY Fair, better known today as it's a small world.

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This afternoon I watched, "It's Love I'm After."

It 's fun to see so many of my favorite dramatic actors just having fun; Olivia de Haviland, Bette Davis, and Leslie Howard, but I laughed hardest at all  the manservant's lines -- Digges, played by Eric Blore.

It struck me how often the butler steals the show in comedies.  It was my favorite part of "Arthur," "A New Leaf," and so many more.

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15 minutes ago, AndreaDoria said:

This afternoon I watched, "It's Love I'm After."

It 's fun to see so many of my favorite dramatic actors just having fun; Olivia de Haviland, Bette Davis, and Leslie Howard, but I laughed hardest at all  the manservant's lines -- Digges, played by Eric Blore.

It struck me how often the butler steals the show in comedies.  It was my favorite part of "Arthur," "A New Leaf," and so many more.

PAULINE KAEL has a really good review of this one. I don’t know if you can look it up online or not.

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PAULINE KAEL has a really good review of this one. I don’t know if you can look it up online or not.

A light farce in which Leslie Howard and Bette Davis play a shallow, vanity-ridden matinée idol and his hot-tempered leading lady, and relish every hammy, slapstick minute of it. They are surrounded by the millionaires (George Barbier), valets and butlers (Eric Blore, E.E. Clive), and silly heiresses (Olivia De Havilland) who were at one time as much of a convention in American comedy as the fops of Restoration theatre. Casey Robinson's script (from a story written for the screen by Maurice Hanline) is musty and Archie Mayo's direction is sluggish, but the movie is pleasantly bad. It begins with a burlesque of the tomb scene from ROMEO AND JULIET and proceeds like a somewhat deranged TAMING OF THE SHREW. With Bonita Granville, Patric Knowles, and Spring Byington. Warners.

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