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14 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Oo-ah! Oo-ah!

No discussion of the experience that is EYES OF LAURA MARS would be complete without mention of "Let's All Chant" by Michael Zager Band. 

Your body, my body
Everybody work your body
 
 

 

someone should do a DANCE MEGAMIX MASH-UP of TRUMAN CAPOTE talking about STUDIO 54 AFTER MIDNIGHT with the song LET'S ALL CHANT:

Oo-ah! Oo-ah!

let's all chant!

"boys and girls..."

Oo-ah! Oo-ah!

let's all chant!

"girls and boys."

Oo-ah! Oo-ah!

let's all chant!

"boys and boys..."

🎶Your body, my body
Everybody work your body
  🎶

"mules and fire hydrants..."

🎶Your body, my body
Everybody work your body
  🎶

“Anything goes."

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17 hours ago, King Rat said:

You do realize that now I will NEVER be able to think of Truman Capote as anything but "a candied tarantula"!

THANK YOU!!!

YOU'RE WELCOME....

AND YET...

That "Candied Tarantula" possessed the incredibly rare and undeniable power as a writer to elicit a GENUINE EMOTIONAL RESPONSE from his readers, his works are all deeply touching in some form or another- from IN COLD BLOOD to THE GRASS HARP to A CHRISTMAS MEMORY- which I BURST INTO TEARS in the FOURTH GRADE when my teacher read it aloud to the class because I knew exactly who that q ueer little fruitcake-bakin boy and his "touched-in-the-head" cousin were.

i think that's why CAPOTE ended up backing away from writing...I think he was a little scared of the MIGHTY power he wielded.

ps- if you ever do drag, you should use the name "CANDY S. TARANTULA."

 

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WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH HELEN?  -- a favorite of mine.  Shelley Winters has, in many ways, the showier role, but I think it's a great showcase for Debbie Reynolds, and I love that her character is named Adele.  I can't explain it, but she seems like an Adele to me.  Also, no matter how many times I watch this movie, I never can remember how certain plot elements are resolved, so it's always like watching it for the first time.

EYES OF LAURA MARS -- not in my top tier of favorites, but irresistible nonetheless.  I love that Laura wears a granny nightgown -- such an interesting choice and an example of using wardrobe to express a character's psychological state.  (I've fantasized about the conversation between Dunaway and Theoni Aldredge about that nightgown!)  According to Julia Phillips, John Peters allegedly told her that he didn't know what La Dunaway got up to in her personal life, but the baggage under her eyes made it very difficult to light her.  Pure speculation on my part, but check out the scene in the police station.  La Dunaway's eyes have that too-big, glazed-over appearance that suggests that she was relying on something other than coffee for her morning pick-me-up.  (ALLEGEDLY!)  (See also: Mia Farrow in the "rose scene" in ROSEMARY'S BABY....allegedly...)

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16 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

YOU'RE WELCOME....

AND YET...

That "Candied Tarantula" possessed the incredibly rare and undeniable power as a writer to elicit a GENUINE EMOTIONAL RESPONSE from his readers, his works are all deeply touching in some form or another- from IN COLD BLOOD to THE GRASS HARP to A CHRISTMAS MEMORY- which I BURST INTO TEARS in the FOURTH GRADE when my teacher read it aloud to the class because I knew exactly who that q ueer little fruitcake-bakin boy and his "touched-in-the-head" cousin were.

i think that's why CAPOTE ended up backing away from writing...I think he was a little scared of the MIGHTY power he wielded.

ps- if you ever do drag, you should use the name "CANDY S. TARANTULA."

 

Or Candide Tarantula...

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My most recent viewing choices -- a Marianna Hill double feature: 

THE TRAVELING EXECUTIONER (1970):  great performance by Stacy Keach, some good Marianna Hill scenes (she stepped in when Dyan Cannon dropped out) although I wish she had been given more to do, and an interesting take on capital punishment.

RED LINE 7000 (1965):  considered by many to be Howard Hawks's worst film, I worship at its altar and will brook no criticisms.  Marianna Hill is a standout as Gabrielle, but I am equally enthralled by the Prentissian Gail Hire in her only film appearance.  (Her only other documented role is as "Miss Bacon" in the second-season "Egghead" episode of BATMAN.)

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

someone should do a DANCE MEGAMIX MASH-UP of TRUMAN CAPOTE talking about STUDIO 54 AFTER MIDNIGHT with the song LET'S ALL CHANT:

Oo-ah! Oo-ah!

let's all chant!

"Oo-ah! Oo-ah!" (More accurately "Oo-ah! Oo! Oo-ah! Oo!")

You referenced the truncated version of the the 1977 hit by The Michael Zager Band, which begins:

AH! AH! A! A! Let's all chant!

 

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American Psycho (2000)

I remember reading the novel at the suggestion of a friend and while I mostly enjoyed it there were several moments when I would wince and ask, why is Ellis doing this? (Someone suggested it was his response to Bonfire of the Vanities. Maybe.)

The movie gave me similar moments. There were laughs ("I'm not really hungry, I just want reservations somewhere." ) There was less gore and more sex than I expected, and it could actually have offered a little more of each. I recommend it only to devotees of such fare.

Chloë Sevigny played her character and her key scene with a tenderness I found genuine as apparently did our psycho, Bateman, who was played with all-in gusto by Christian Bale.

In reading about the movie afterward  I discovered this lovely bit of parody that I have to share. It's also as good a review as any.

 

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On 6/13/2022 at 6:01 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Joanna Cassidy was a character actress in the 80s who appeared in both some films and in some brief arcs on TV shows of the time (like Falcon Crest). She is probably best known for her part as an ill-fated replicant in Blade Runner. She also appeared in Under Fire, The Late Show, Club Paradise, Don't Tell mom the babysitter's Dead, Stay Hungry, and Dangerous Beauty

She's also in a Neo Noir Too Late (2015)

Poster%2BToo%2BLate%2B2015.jpg

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I just came back from a trip to the Netherlands and on my last night i stayed not just in the same hotel, but the exact room that my favorite jazz musician, Chet Baker, died tragically in.  Kind of dark but was a rather cool experience.  So once I got home I re-watched the documentary Let's Get Lost, which I love.  Highly recommend it.

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1 hour ago, Shank Asu said:

I just came back from a trip to the Netherlands and on my last night i stayed not just in the same hotel, but the exact room that my favorite jazz musician, Chet Baker, died tragically in.  Kind of dark but was a rather cool experience.  So once I got home I re-watched the documentary Let's Get Lost, which I love.  Highly recommend it.

Hopefully you keep the window closed.    Yea,  that was a sad loss.    Chet Baker was a solid jazz musician.    As for his singing;  I still don't know how to view  that.   Some songs I like and others I just don't know how to 'process' them.

 

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currently watching a print of 1971's Taking Off on another website. It was Milos Forman's directorial debut in America, and it probably explains why he was asked to help Hair at the end of the decade. The film is a loose series of vignettes as a low key middle class couple (character actors Buck Henry and Lynn Carlin, both in rare leading roles) are drawn into the world of the counterculture (replete with this most unlikely couple experimenting with pot and strip poker, resulting in some very painful nudity) as they search for their daughter who ran away from home.  It's rather light, at times quite charming, at times just plain odd. But it does work overall, and it does serve as a sort of future familiar face experience. The runaway daughter might not have appeared in another film, but Georgia Engel, Audra Lindley, Paul Benedict, and Philip Bruns would all be soon seen on well-known 70s sitcoms (Mary Tyler Moore, Three's Company, The Jeffersons, Mary Hartman x 2, respectively), Tina and Ike Turner have a musical number, and we also get brief glances of pre-fame Carly Simon, Kathy Bates, and Jessica Harper. An interesting time capsule.

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3 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Hopefully you keep the window closed.    Yea,  that was a sad loss.    Chet Baker was a solid jazz musician.    As for his singing;  I still don't know how to view  that.   Some songs I like and others I just don't know how to 'process' them.

 

I'm guessing you're much more knowledgeable on the technical aspect of jazz.  I actually like his singing a lot and prefer the tunes that also have his vocals.  The room was a trip though.  His name is on the door along with a trumpet and many pieces of artwork and photos of him fill the room.  In the window there's a picture of him covering a large pane of glass looking out to the street.  It's actually easy to see how someone can fall through the windows as the windows go all the wall to the floor.

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2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

currently watching a print of 1971's Taking Off on another website. It was Milos Forman's directorial debut in America, and it probably explains why he was asked to help Hair at the end of the decade. The film is a loose series of vignettes as a low key middle class couple (character actors Buck Henry and Lynn Carlin, both in rare leading roles) are drawn into the world of the counterculture (replete with this most unlikely couple experimenting with pot and strip poker, resulting in some very painful nudity) as they search for their daughter who ran away from home.  It's rather light, at times quite charming, at times just plain odd. But it does work overall, and it does serve as a sort of future familiar face experience. The runaway daughter might not have appeared in another film, but Georgia Engel, Audra Lindley, Paul Benedict, and Philip Bruns would all be soon seen on well-known 70s sitcoms (Mary Tyler Moore, Three's Company, The Jeffersons, Mary Hartman x 2, respectively), Tina and Ike Turner have a musical number, and we also get brief glances of pre-fame Carly Simon, Kathy Bates, and Jessica Harper. An interesting time capsule.

I attended a repertory screening of this years ago.  The thing that stands out in my memory is Kathy Bates's singing voice, which was quite lovely, as I recall.  Isn't she billed as Bobo Bates?  It's a film I've wanted to revisit, and seems like a title that certain Blu-ray boutique labels would release.

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34 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

I'm guessing you're much more knowledgeable on the technical aspect of jazz.  I actually like his singing a lot and prefer the tunes that also have his vocals.  The room was a trip though.  His name is on the door along with a trumpet and many pieces of artwork and photos of him fill the room.  In the window there's a picture of him covering a large pane of glass looking out to the street.  It's actually easy to see how someone can fall through the windows as the windows go all the wall to the floor.

Well Chet's vocal range was limited especially for a jazz singer but he sang with such feeling that any technical limitation are overcome.

 

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3 hours ago, PhillyCinephile said:

I attended a repertory screening of this years ago.  The thing that stands out in my memory is Kathy Bates's singing voice, which was quite lovely, as I recall.  Isn't she billed as Bobo Bates?  It's a film I've wanted to revisit, and seems like a title that certain Blu-ray boutique labels would release.

Apparently Taking Off can't be released on home video in the U.S. because of music rights (the need to identify each of the young singers in the opening scene). But yes, it is a time capsule of a particular world.

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Murder at Glen Athol (1936)

 

A vacationing detective with a wacky sidekick is trying to write a book about his adventures when he is dragged into the local social scene. They should be his kind of people since the first party he attends ends with multiple murders. 

There are many instances when a smooth and very likeable detective spawns a series of movies based on the character. It should surprise no viewer that John Miljan as Detective Bill Holt was a one-off. I have read that he made a career playing villain in Westerns and I can readily believe he was very good as it is very easy to find his looks and manners harsh and borderline despicable. 

Iris Adrian is wonderful as the overly-perky brat whom everyone wants to strangle.

Irene Ware was well cast as the love interest but I fear that I must say that her role was slightly larger than her ability to carry it gracefully. I found that she was merely average rather than brilliant.

I believe the major fault of the movie is: James P. Burtis as the wacky sidekick. His performance was so very heavy-handed that it destroyed any humor or finesses in every scene in which he appeared.

The mystery is sufficiently twisty that i held my interest but it will never become a favorite.

6.1/11

It is available on: TubiTV.

 

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On 6/14/2022 at 8:25 PM, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

"Oo-ah! Oo-ah!" (More accurately "Oo-ah! Oo! Oo-ah! Oo!")

You're incorrect.

"Oo-ah! Oo-ah!" is the more accurate representation of the sounds  in the single version of "Let's All Chant,"  not Oo-ah! Oo! Oo-ah! Oo!"

Here's the song as heard during the photo shoot scene in EYES OF LAURA MARS.

I always look forward to Faye Dunaway's "That's enough!"  when the fake blood is being poured on the male model playing the corpse in the pool.

 

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9 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

currently watching a print of 1971's Taking Off on another website. It was Milos Forman's directorial debut in America, and it probably explains why he was asked to help Hair at the end of the decade. The film is a loose series of vignettes as a low key middle class couple (character actors Buck Henry and Lynn Carlin, both in rare leading roles) are drawn into the world of the counterculture (replete with this most unlikely couple experimenting with pot and strip poker, resulting in some very painful nudity) as they search for their daughter who ran away from home.  It's rather light, at times quite charming, at times just plain odd. But it does work overall, and it does serve as a sort of future familiar face experience. The runaway daughter might not have appeared in another film, but Georgia Engel, Audra Lindley, Paul Benedict, and Philip Bruns would all be soon seen on well-known 70s sitcoms (Mary Tyler Moore, Three's Company, The Jeffersons, Mary Hartman x 2, respectively), Tina and Ike Turner have a musical number, and we also get brief glances of pre-fame Carly Simon, Kathy Bates, and Jessica Harper. An interesting time capsule.

Those who know Audra Lindley only from Three's Company might be surprised to learn that in the 1960s she had been the ultimate soap opera "woman you love to hate" as Liz Matthews on Another World. Those who only knew the harmless busybody Liz Matthews of Irene Dailey (a fine actress but with weak material) would be startled at the malevolence and craziness that Audra Lindley and her successor, Nancy Wickwire, got to play. 

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Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

After watching American Psycho overnight yesterday I scrolled through other HBO Max offerings and saw a title and a graphic that looked interesting. I scanned the synopsis and thought, why not have a look?

 

kffoWJ7FfPRlFFBGixOMbq3blQp-scaled.jpg

 

It had me from the start, with scenes like a dealer making a late night delivery of three killer vintage electric guitars to a musician who records on decades-old analog equipment in his falling down but once-magnificent and still barely livable home (I thought of Jimmy Page's Tower House immediately and I bet I was meant to), itself filled with one cool as hell object after another; a witchy-looking but still somehow attractive white-haired lady in Tangier surrounded by antique books; John Hurt looking like the coolest old hippie ever; Detroit urbex location shooting; and Tangier, looking not much better. Great fun to look at. 

Turns out the musician and the witchy bookish woman are old vampires, as is John Hurt's character, "Kit" Marlowe (yes, that Kit Marlowe). There were signs early on that this movie isn't aimed at me. I don't believe Tesla was a misunderstood genius, I don't fixate on Darwin, and I don't believe Shakespeare was a fraud. 

Adam, the musical vampire, played by Tom Hiddleston  comes off more as a remnant of the Beat generation than a contemporary of Schubert, and his dialogue is as tired as he is, and seemingly stuck in, despite the culture he has seen in his 100 plus years, the 1980s. Eve, his wife, played by Tilda Swinton, who for some reason lives in Tangier, has a happier more romantic worldview, even if she too is starting to feel the centuries.

Chekhov's gun law ("If you say in the first chapter that there is a rifle hanging on the wall, in the second or third chapter it absolutely must go off. If it’s not going to be fired, it shouldn’t be hanging there.") is violated with, ironically, a bullet made of wood, a clever means of vampire suicide that is discarded as soon as Eve, come to Detroit to see her hubby, discovers it.

Then toward the end a performance by singer Yasmine Hamdan in a Tangier saloon is ... interesting, but serves no apparent purpose that I could discern, but then I often miss subtleties.  The several literary historic and scientific references were not terribly deep, so I doubt there are many subtleties to miss. Then when the credits rolled I learned I had been watching a Jim Jarmusch movie and I thought, fairly or not, all the little things that bothered me suddenly had a reason: They were there because Jim liked them. 

It felt like a good idea that was made up ultimately of slapped together bits, including Eve's bratty little sister who has to show up and do her mischief to move things along. Not the tightest screenplay but generally worthwhile. 

 

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13 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I actually like his singing a lot and prefer the tunes that also have his vocals.  The room was a trip though. 

I'm totally a Chet Baker fan & love his androgynous singing voice. Who could forget TCMs daytime opening theme, "Sunny Side of Life" with just that slow trumpet solo at the end? 

Being a fan I always wanted to see LET'S GET LOST and a movie buddy burned me a bootleg copy of it. Partly because of the low quality of the dupe & partly because of the sadness it contains, I never got past the first 15-20 minutes. Should I give it another try?

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1 hour ago, Tikisoo said:

I'm totally a Chet Baker fan & love his androgynous singing voice. Who could forget TCMs daytime opening theme, "Sunny Side of Life" with just that slow trumpet solo at the end? 

Being a fan I always wanted to see LET'S GET LOST and a movie buddy burned me a bootleg copy of it. Partly because of the low quality of the dupe & partly because of the sadness it contains, I never got past the first 15-20 minutes. Should I give it another try?

i became OBSESSED with CHET BAKER when I lived in LA.

I think these two are my favorite tracks of his (i prefer all his recordings where he sings over his instreumentals)

 

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14 hours ago, PhillyCinephile said:

I attended a repertory screening of this years ago.  The thing that stands out in my memory is Kathy Bates's singing voice, which was quite lovely, as I recall.  Isn't she billed as Bobo Bates? 

See the source image

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The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu (1929)

The first talkie Fu Manchu thriller, as well as the first film in which, I believe, Warner Oland played an Oriental. I was expecting this early talkie to be a primitively stagy, creaky affair. Well it is stagy and creaky, to a degree, but more animated and enjoyable than anticipated.

The film provides a background history to Fu Manchu, initially a peaceful, happy man until his family is accidentally killed by British troops during the Boxer Rebellion and he then swears vengeance upon the white race, in particular the ancestors of the British directly responsible for the deaths of his wife and son.

The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu (1929) - IMDb

Oland's criminal mastermind Fu Manchu has a considerably more extroverted performance from the Swedish actor than we would see him later deliver when he became the movies most famous Charlie Chan. Of course, the film is politically incorrect, very much in the racist Yellow Menace tradition of melodramas of the time. Fu is seen resorting to poison, poison darts and hypnotism of white women in order to have his way.

A young Jean Arthur co stars as a white woman adopted as a little girl by Fu who has no idea of his evil ways and can be placed under a hypnotic spell by him to carry out a killing. Arthur is very cute in her role but, alas, not convincing as an actress. Then, again, her role would be a challenge for almost any actress to carry off believably.

Part of the hokiness, as well as the dated charm of a film like this, is a key scene in which Fu Manchu tries to hypnotize Arthur into killing the film's hero (Neil Hamilton), tied up helplessly in a chair, while the hero yells at the girl to fight the evil Fu's will power.

"You shall do as I say," Fu Manchu ominously intones, "You hear me?"

"I hear you, master," Arthur replies, succumbing to his will power.

"You are my slave," Fu says.

"I am your slave," she replies.

Laughably melodramatic as it is, it's still fun to see.

The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu (1929)

As are some of the sets. There is an old house on the top of a cliff, with waves crashing down below, as well as a howling wind that serves as the setting for the film's climax. Inside the spacious, spartanly furnished house is a huge winding staircase. I wondered if this staircase may have been an inspiration for similar staircases in the immediate years to come over at Universal with their upcoming productions of Dracula and Frankenstein.

O. P. Heggie is a credible Nayland Smith, Scotland Yard inspector and mortal enemy of Fu Manchu. Heggie is best remembered today as the blind hermit in The Bride of Frankenstein.

William Austin, playing an effeminate friend of the leading players, provides the film's dated, largely unfunny comic relief. He will do things like crash down that giant staircase tangled with a suit of armour, the same kind of lame comic stunt that black comic relief actors would be reduced to doing in countless mystery or horror vehicles throughout the '30s and early '40s.

Character actor Noble Johnson can also be seen as Fu Manchu's evil henchman, Li Po. Johnson, a black actor who played a variety of ethnic roles throughout his career (best remembered today as the native chief in King Kong) performs in a bizarre yellow face in this film. At one point he ask Fu Manchu if he wants him to carry out a murder. You can tell that Li Po enjoys his work because he can't get a crooked smile off his face while asking the question.

The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu was released as both a silent and talkie in 1929. Only the talkie version still exists. It would be the first of three films in which Oland played Sax Romer's fictional character, the two followups being The Return of Dr. Fu Manchu (1930) and Daughter of the Dragon (1931). Soon after that MGM would assume the screen rights to the criminal mastermind with a one shot deal, The Mask of Fu Manchu starring Boris Karloff and Myrna Loy as his equally evil daughter who enjoys seeing a man whipped. Later in the '60s, of course, Christopher Lee would play the role in a series of gaudy thrillers.

Kino Lorber has released on blu ray a double bill of The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu and The Return of Dr. Fu Manchu with quite lovely looking prints (these two films had previously been seen on the internet with only ghastly images). Many thanks to KL for the restorations.

The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu / The Return of Dr. Fu Manchu Blu-ray

2.5 out of 4

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