Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I Just Watched...


speedracer5
 Share

Recommended Posts

Maggie's Plan (2015)  Maggie's plan (played by Greta Gerwig) is to artificially inseminate herself ("home style") by having a donor (a former fellow student) come over to her house and do the "****" in her bathroom while she plays music (making sure it is loud enough) while dancing around in the living room. Just before, the young man requests that "perhaps, you know, we might do it normal style." but Maggie with a sweet smile politely declines. After he leaves, she finds at her door an acquaintance (Ethan Hawke) who has a twinkle in his eye and makes a declaration. He is already married with two children. His spouse is played by Julianne Moore who is too old for the part but pulls it off. She is a tenured professor at Columbia. Her name is Georgette and I am not sure of her origin (Europe?) but intones a magnificent accent. Magnificent because it so understated. You hear but simultaneous forget how she is talking, which is a supreme validation, Not the usually overdone-ness. She is serious and doesn't smile very much but she has a cute scene in the snow that almost make you love her. Greta is pretty solid and being the main character does a good job, intentional or no, of not overdoing it. I would say she is about perfect. Recommended.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

I'm totally a Chet Baker fan & love his androgynous singing voice. Who could forget TCMs daytime opening theme, "Sunny Side of Life" with just that slow trumpet solo at the end? 

Being a fan I always wanted to see LET'S GET LOST and a movie buddy burned me a bootleg copy of it. Partly because of the low quality of the dupe & partly because of the sadness it contains, I never got past the first 15-20 minutes. Should I give it another try?

I would try.  The  beginning is a bit jarring, and you can tell that the director, Bruce Weber is a photographer first, a music video director second, and a film director last.  Some of the final scenes can only be described as haunting.  It was nominated for an Oscar for best documentary, if you put any weight in that.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did anyone else what Flight From Glory (1937) yesterday?      First time I saw this RKO film with Chester Morris,  Whitney Bourne and in his third film,  Van Heflin.

The overall setting is similar to the Hawks directed,  Grant\Arthur film Only Angel Have Wings but here the owner of the flight company is a real jerk (at best!).

This comes off as a pre-code since there are two things that occur that surprised me.     

Chester Morris was good in that he wasn't wooden and I don't recall ever seeing Bourne but I liked her in this fillm.

    Flight From Glory - Rotten Tomatoes

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/16/2022 at 4:53 AM, LuckyDan said:

Only Lovers Left Alive (2013)

After watching American Psycho overnight yesterday I scrolled through other HBO+ offerings and saw a title and a graphic that looked interesting. I scanned the synopsis and thought, why not have a look?

 

kffoWJ7FfPRlFFBGixOMbq3blQp-scaled.jpg

 

It had me from the start, with scenes like a dealer making a late night delivery of three killer vintage electric guitars to a musician who records on decades-old analog equipment in his falling down but once-magnificent and still barely livable home (I thought of Jimmy Page's Tower House immediately and I bet I was meant to), itself filled with one cool as hell object after another; a witchy-looking but still somehow attractive white-haired lady in Tangier surrounded by antique books; John Hurt looking like the coolest old hippie ever; Detroit urbex location shooting; and Tangier, looking not much better. Great fun to look at. 

Turns out the musician and the witchy bookish woman are old vampires, as is John Hurt's character, "Kit" Marlowe (yes, that Kit Marlowe). There were signs early on that this movie isn't aimed at me. I don't believe Tesla was a misunderstood genius, I don't fixate on Darwin, and I don't believe Shakespeare was a fraud. 

Adam, the musical vampire, played by Tom Hiddleston  comes off more as a remnant of the Beat generation than a contemporary of Schubert, and his dialogue is as tired as he is, and seemingly stuck in, despite the culture he has seen in his 100 plus years, the 1980s. Eve, his wife, played by Tilda Swinton, who for some reason lives in Tangier, has a happier more romantic worldview, even if she too is starting to feel the centuries.

Chekhov's gun law ("If you say in the first chapter that there is a rifle hanging on the wall, in the second or third chapter it absolutely must go off. If it’s not going to be fired, it shouldn’t be hanging there.") is violated with, ironically, a bullet made of wood, a clever means of vampire suicide that is discarded as soon as Eve, come to Detroit to see her hubby, discovers it.

Then toward the end a performance by singer Yasmine Hamdan in a Tangier saloon is ... interesting, but serves no apparent purpose that I could discern, but then I often miss subtleties.  The several literary historic and scientific references were not terribly deep, so I doubt there are many subtleties to miss. Then when the credits rolled I learned I had been watching a Jim Jarmusch movie and I thought, fairly or not, all the little things that bothered me suddenly had a reason: They were there because Jim liked them. 

It felt like a good idea that was made up ultimately of slapped together bits, including Eve's bratty little sister who has to show up and do her mischief to move things along. Not the tightest screenplay but generally worthwhile. 

 

It is very nice to see that some other person takes this movie seriously. I found it quite moving and thought-provoking but there is little appreciation for it in this forum.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MV5BMTc0NDU5MTczMl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNjU3

Bright Lights, Big City from 1988 with Michael J. Fox, Kiefer Sutherland and Phoebe Cates
 
 
When the book Bright LIght, Big City came out, it was more than a best seller, it was heralded as the work of a promising new literary genius, author Jay Mcinerney. "This generation's Fitzgerald or Hemingway" was even heard now and then. The movie was highly anticipated, but generally considered a disappointment, which deflated the Mcinerney bubble a bit. 
 
Over thirty years later, the movie, now free of expectations, is fine as a piece of 1980s culture. Being two year out of college and working in New York City when it came out, albeit in finance not publishing, it was like seeing a part of your world up on screen. Watching it now is not quite nostalgic, but more as if you're looking at a friend's home movies from that era.
 
I've never done drugs, mainly because they scare me, but in 1980s New York, drugs, cocaine in particular, were nearly as popular as alcohol (now that I've tried). The movie isn't exaggerating cocaine's popularity nor destructive power as, back then, everyone knew a few people who crashed their lives because of it.
 
In Bright Lights, Big City, Michael J. Fox plays a young fact-checker for a prestigious old literary magazine by day and a mad partier, with his partner in crime, played by Kiefer Sutherland, at night. 
 
There was always a Sutherland-like guy around back then - the guy who was always out, always knew a "hot" party or place to go, always had a girl for you to meet and called you at all hours to join him. His character isn't an exaggeration.
 
Nor is the office Fox works in an exaggeration. Back then, especially in the "old-line" companies, kids out of college were supposed to be deeply grateful for their low-paying jobs and in awe of the older bosses. Thankfully, most of that attitude is gone today, but Mcinerney nailed the "tone" of those 1980s offices perfectly. 
 
When the movie opens, Fox's character is clearly approaching a breakpoint as he's failing at work in part because of his partying at night. We also learn, mainly through flashbacks, that his wife, played by Phoebe Cates, just left him.
 
Fox met her in college in Kentucky, with the implication being she saw him as her ticket to New York City, while he couldn't believe his luck in getting such a beautiful girl. Once in the City, afraid she'd lose him to New York's deep pool of pretty young women, she pressured him into marriage.
 
The tables were then turned as she, almost on a lark, began a successful modeling career; whereas, his writing career never got started. She was now the hot up-and-coming model married to (cue downbeat music) a fact-checker. Away on a shoot in Paris, one night, she calls Fox to tell him the marriage is over.
 
The last piece of Fox's implosion puzzle is that he's never come to terms with his mother's death a year ago. In one of the most-forced literary metaphors ever, Fox follows the struggles of the "Coma Baby," a New York City tabloid story about a fetus inside a mother who's in a coma owing to a car accident. The mother dies, but the baby comes out and lives. Get it?
 
Most of Bright Lights, Big City is seeing all these threads come together as Fox's world begins to crumble around him and his lines of coke. His job, his ex-wife, his drug habit and the one-year anniversary of his mother's death all force a come-to-Jesus moment in the movie's climax.
 
The on-location filming of Bright Lights, Big City captured New York City at that moment: gleaming new office towers, turn-of-the-century factories that were now nightclubs or fancy condos, and the old tenements that used to house poor immigrant families that were now rundown apartments for kids just out of college perfectly reflected the City's real estate market in the 1980s. 
 
Plus, the city is chockablock with yellow cabs, not Ubers; phone booths, not smartphones; stereo systems, not speakers streaming music and newspapers and flyers, not apps. It is fun time travel for us today. The gruff-but-okay guy delivering bread in the early morning that Fox swaps his sunglasses with for a loaf of bread is every New York City delivery guy from that era. 
 
It's hard to understand why Mcinerney's book was so lauded in its day; it's a good-of-the-moment read, but not literary brilliance. The movie was generally panned when it came out, but probably suffered from the high expectations of the overly praised book. Today, the movie Bright Lights, Big City is a good cultural curio, more valuable for its snapshot of the City in the 1980s than its just-okay story. 
 
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1967)

Watched this on TCM the other night. I had first seen it at Radio City Music Hall. It remains entertaining, with a very '60s look and a great score. In addition to Robert Morse and Rudy Vallee, a few of the supporting cast members from the original Broadway production got to reprise their roles in the film. It's rare to see Broadway veterans Ruth Kobart (who plays Miss Jones) and Sammy Smith (who plays Wally Womper) in substantial roles in movies.

Although early television star Robert Q. Lewis wasn't in the Broadway cast, it was also interesting to see him in a supporting role in the film.  George Fenneman also makes a brief appearance.

ruthkobart01.jpg

Robert Morse, Ruth Kobart

140837-576a.jpg

Sammy Smith

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man Bites Dog (1992)

If Quentin Tarantino had made David Holzman's Diary it might look like Man Bites Dog. The violence is swift, brutal and unrelenting and the camera often lingers over the gore.

man-bites-dog.jpg?w=1920&ssl=1

It's a mock documentary about a full-of-himself poet-musician-serial murderer named Ben who is the subject of amateur documentarians who themselves gradually become accomplices in Ben's "work." Along the way we learn Ben's trade secrets such as the weight ratios needed to ballast different categories of corpses to prevent their bodies from floating to the surface after being dumped into water. (There is a continuity error involved there.)

It was shot in Belgium in black and white on 16mm film. The opening scenes looked to me like a 1960s New Wave movie, and there is a kind of dated, out-of-time feel to it with the old Belgian locales. It is visually both plain and appealing. 

There is a child murder in the NC-17 version I saw, and a rape scene, Euro-style as Joe Bob Briggs might say - no one shows up to stop it. 

Overall, pretty sick stuff but somehow compelling. The violence isn't gleeful, and doesn't seem to have been meant to titillate those who might tend to be titillated by it. One scene toward the end shows us that even killers themselves have become benumbed to it. 

Ultimately Ben has to deal with the loss of his own loved ones and we see he has some humanity in him, and we get a fittingly poetic ending. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I had first seen it at Radio City Music Hall.

Me too!  My one trip to New York City.  we had got on the bus at Ohio State gone on a peace march at Central Park, then to Radio City Music Hall.

"We" being my gay friend and I, which brings me to:

"A Taste of Honey"  I loved this movie.  The relationship between the two young people, particularly after she ran into him at the fair and then they played together all day,  was exactly like a thing  I had when I was that age.  We just fell instantly in love and even though it was platonic it was intense and joyful.  One of the best times of my life. 

Oh yes, the movie.  I thought the  story was good, reminded me a little of, "Georgie Girl," Best part was the actor, Murray Melvin, who was just radiant.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, AndreaDoria said:

Me too!  My one trip to New York City.  we had got on the bus at Ohio State gone on a peace march at Central Park, then to Radio City Music Hall.

"We" being my gay friend and I, which brings me to:

"A Taste of Honey"  I loved this movie.  The relationship between the two young people, particularly after she ran into him at the fair and then they played together all day,  was exactly like a thing  I had when I was that age.  We just fell instantly in love and even though it was platonic it was intense and joyful.  One of the best times of my life. 

Oh yes, the movie.  I thought the  story was good, reminded me a little of, "Georgie Girl," Best part was the actor, Murray Melvin, who was just radiant.

I love A Taste of Honey too.  I saw a revival of the play at the National Theatre in London in 2014. It was good, but I think the movie is better!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, AndreaDoria said:

"A Taste of Honey"  I loved this movie.

The movie boogie oogie oogies 'til it just won't boogie no more.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Fading Fast said:



It's hard to understand why Mcinerney's book was so lauded in its day; it's a good-of-the-moment read, but not literary brilliance. The movie was generally panned when it came out, but probably suffered from the high expectations of the overly praised book. Today, the movie Bright Lights, Big City is a good cultural curio, more valuable for its snapshot of the City in the 1980s than its just-okay story. 
 

A friend of mine knew Jay McInerney at Syracuse University and detested him. According to my friend, the soulless, smartass nature of Bright Lights, Big City reflected its author. My friend was not unhappy when McInerney's subsequent career went downhill.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I first saw the 1935 UNIVERSAL version of THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD starring CLAUDE RAINS maybe four or five years ago when it popped up on youtube.

[for those not in the know, it's the story of an opium addicted choirmaster who possibly murders his nephew because he is going to marry a girl he loves]

See the source image

TCM has since shown it a couple of times- which was very nice of them- and I wish they'd show it again.

it has since been pulled from youtube, so on a whim, I ordered a UNIVERSAL VAULT SERIES DVD of it- note, the film is on BLU RAY, but I never got a BLU-RAY player.

I have never in my life seen a DVD like this- to call it "no frills" is an understatement- there are no extras- which I get- but also, there is no menu, no chapters, no audio options- you put this thing in and it plays the movie, and when it's done it's done and that is IT. I half-expected the DVD player to open and for it to SPIT THE DISC forcefully across the room.

the print is so-so at best as well.

all that aside, this is a delicious little curiosity, not exactly a true UNIVERSAL HORROR, but CLOSE and it does have CLAUDE RAINS and DAVID MANNERS [at MAXIMUM LEVEL FEY] and VALERIE HOBSON (in an awful, awful role that they knew was bad because they give her the last shot of the film as a way of making up for it)

It also has some intriguingly re-purposed sets from THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN - including the crypt and the MItteleuropean village- which gives the whole thing a feel verymuch in step with the many horror films of 1935 (it's a damn shame  they couldn't find parts for DWIGHT FRYE and UNA O'CONNOR and ERNEST THESIGER in this!!!)

There was talk of getting LA KARLOFF to play the murderous choirmaster JOHN JASPER, but ulitmately I am glad they got CLAUDE RAINS because he is perfect for the part- sadly, the script (in part by JOHN BALDERSTON who had a hand in the scripts of DRACULA and FRANKENSTEIN and MAD LOVE and others] and the direction let RAINS down and he is forced to play the part in an erratic fashion- which he is great at- but one wishes he had been allowed to slowly open up the character as oppopsed to launching into tirades a few minutes in...also, there is a loooong scene where RAINS is forced to LIP SYNC to someone else singing a solo hymn and it almost murders the film early on.

ZEFFIE TILBURY is marvelous as THE OPIUM WOMAN, I admit I have a soft spot for HIDEOUS CRONES, but she really steals the film. she also VERY CLEARLY MOUTHS THE WORD "SH!T" to the camera at the end of her first scene.

See the source image"so BOW DOWN to 'er, BOW DOWN IF YA LIKE!"

DOUGLASS MONTGOMERY- who is not good in some other films- really redeems himself here with a demanding part.

as someone who has read- and liked- the unfinished DICKENS NOVEL on which this movie is faithfully based (and ends, I imagine, much as the book would have had DICKENS not died before finishing it)- I do take issue with the film's rendering of the CHARACTER OF DURDLES THE GRAVEDIGGER, who is a hopeless blackout drunk who actually pays a local 10-year old boy to throw stones at him and cajole him at night  in order to keep him from passing out in the cold or falling into a grave...the film comes nowhere near capturing how genuinely hilarious the dynamic is between them- frankly, they are my favorite two characters in ALL DICKENSDOM and I would have welcomed it if they had teamed up IN THE NAME OF THE ROSE-style to solve not just THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD, but murders across The Continent....

 

 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I first saw the 1935 UNIVERSAL version of THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD starring CLAUDE RAINS maybe four or five years ago when it popped up on youtube . . .

During my formative years, The Mystery of Edwin Drood was routinely shown on Weird, Weird World, a showcase for Universal horror films on Los Angeles television. Whether Universal Pictures' adaptation is a horror film is debatable. Based on Universal's marketing department, it was certainly sold as a horror movie. As a tyke, I found it immensely disappointing and dull because it didn't seem to be a horror movie. As an adult, I can better appreciate its (IMO, modest) thrills -- a new one being Zeffie Tilbury cussing. For promoting that perverse pleasure, I thank you, LornaHansonForbes!

default.jpg

Zeffie Tillbury in Her Prime (Not Bad! Not Bad at All!)

The Cinematic Adaptations of The Mystery of Edwin Drood: 1909, 1914, 1935, and 1993; or, Dickens Gone Hollywood

Review of Kino Lorber Blu-ray Disc

BBC Two Version of The Mystery of Edwin Drood

Clips from The Musical Version

Charles Dickens' Edwin Drood

affich_78704_1.jpg

71156-mystery-of-edwin-drood-0-460-0-690

e4rT8Lhkts%2BWNCbf8u59dkdehYLedRI8xzjFg=

79e0e97607a261345fed02e3411c9773.jpg

255053-3.jpg

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I do take issue with the film's rendering of the CHARACTER OF DURDLES THE GRAVEDIGGER, who is a hopeless blackout drunk who actually pays a local 10-year old boy to throw stones at him and cajole him at night  in order to keep him from passing out in the cold or falling into a grave...the film comes nowhere near capturing how genuinely hilarious the dynamic is between them- frankly, they are my favorite two characters in ALL DICKENSDOM and I would have welcomed it if they had teamed up IN THE NAME OF THE ROSE-style to solve not just THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD, but murders across The Continent....

 

Why do directors leave out these great scenes?  I've watched many versions of "Great Expectations," and none of them have shown the scene in the little village where Pip comes out of the tailor's shop in his new, posh clothes and the local boy  skips mocking circles around him all the way down the street.  Nobody appreciates a ten year-old boy like Dickens.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AndreaDoria said:

Why do directors leave out these great scenes?  I've watched many versions of "Great Expectations," and none of them have shown the scene in the little village where Pip comes out of the tailor's shop in his new, posh clothes and the local boy  skips mocking circles around him all the way down the street.  Nobody appreciates a ten year-old boy like Dickens.

Oh, DURDLES AND THE KID are in THE (1935) MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD (It would be pretty much impossible to omit them from the story as they play a major part) I just took issue with their portrayal in the film. They hired a very loud, very obnoxious, clearly untrained young American boy to play the kid and he is so loud in all of his scenes He just overpowers everyone and everything else on screen. All the subtle comedy and the ridiculousness of their dynamic that is in the book is lost.

It really would’ve been wonderful if James Whale had been able to direct Edwin Drood-  I have a feeling that he would’ve done a better job not just with DURDLES and his sidekick, but with some of the other characters and scenarios as well. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I first saw the 1935 UNIVERSAL version of THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD starring CLAUDE RAINS maybe four or five years ago when it popped up on youtube.

 

I love this movie, having first seen it as a child, when it was part of the Shock Theater Universal package, introduced by Zacherley. It has a great cast and the sort of antique atmosphere that makes classic movies so appealing.  I agree about Zeffie Tilbury, she's great, as always. The Mystery of Edwin Drood was directed by Stuart Walker the same year -- 1935 -- that he directed Werewolf of London, which also features Zeffie, Ethel Griffies, and some of the same actors as Drood. 

Btw, Zeffie Tilbury's mother was Lydia Thompson, one of the great performers of the second half of the 19th century.

main-image

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MV5BYTAzMTUxZGItMGJkZS00NzBhLTllYzItYWYy

The Glass Wall from 1953 with Vittorio Gassman and Gloria Grahame

 
 
A man unjustly accused goes on the run from the law trying to find the one man who can exonerate him. Along the way, he meets a blonde who tries to help him in his quest. 
 
No, it's not North By Northwest or Saboteur, but a short eighty-minute post-war noir that could have used Hitchcock's directing skills, but still works as a low-budget, if uneven effort with a bit too-much obvious political preaching. 
 
A "displaced person," played by Vittorio Gassman, from the ravages of post-war Europe is held up at US immigration because he can't give enough information to have his friend located - the man who can provide the evidence he needs to gain entry to the United States. He met and helped this man in Europe during their brief relationship in the war. 
 
So he escapes from immigration custody and begins a desperate search in Times Square because he knows his friend's first name is "Tom" and he's a musician who once played in some club in Times Square. Good luck with that, buddy. 
 
He has to search from the shadows as the police have released his picture to the newspapers, which run it on their front pages for several days (it must have been the slowest news period ever in New York City). Increasing Gassman's desperation, he broke a few ribs in his escape, plus he has only a couple of dollars in his pocket. 
 
Along the way, he befriends a barely scraping by young woman, played by Gloria Grahame, who tries to help, but she needs help almost as much as he does. Starring along with Gassman and Grahame is Times Square, where a mix of incredible on-location shots and background stock footage showcase all the luminous brilliance and human seediness of the streets of The Great White Way.
 
Stalking Gassman all the time are the police and immigration officers who, like the newspapers, seem to have nothing else to do for a few days but to chase down this one illegal immigrant. 
 
All of this is just a set up for a few "message" scenes. In one, a kind stripper takes a hungry Gassman to her mother's apartment for dinner. The mother upbraids her arrogant "I'm an American" son who wants this "dirty immigrant" (Gassman) out of their apartment with this killer line, "your father was a 'dirty immigrant' too." 
 
It's wonderful to hear, in this pre-politically-correct era, this close Hungarian family sling the term "Hunky" around at each other in a way that says, "hey, we get that some see us in this insulting way, but still, this is one great country even if it isn't perfect." My grandparents, all but one were immigrants or first-generation Americans, and their friends almost all felt this way, too, about both the insults (shrug, it's better than a pogrom, beating or death) and America (love it).
 
As the search intensifies owing to a "deportation" deadline, and in the second way-too-obvious "message" scene, Gassman runs into a pre-dawn, deserted UN building looking for the Human Rights Commission. There he gives a speech in desperation - a cri de coeur - to an empty chamber shouting how the world can't truly be free until every man, everywhere, has a safe home. Dear Lord, subtlety is not writer Ivan Tors nor director and writer Maxwell Shane's metier. 
 
After that (spoiler alert), it's a chase to the roof of the UN (a Hitchcockian echo) followed by a last-minute save where Gassman is reunited with his friend. Once all the confusion is cleared up, he's allowed to stay in America and gets to kiss the blonde (Grahame). The Glass Wall is clunky, too obvious and preachy, but the story holds your attention with a strong assist from the acting talents of Gassman and Grahame.    
 
 
N.B #1. It's both funny and sad to see the still-being-completed United Nations building held up as a beacon of hope for the world's human rights challenges.
 
N.B #2 For about five years, I lived a block away from the UN, so often, my old apartment building pops up in the background of many movies with a UN connection, but not this one. 
 
MV5BOTIxYzQzZjgtZjQ4NS00YmU2LWIxNjUtMGVm
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...