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5 hours ago, Fedya said:

Only one knocker? :o

Our Knocker Cigars were either the baseball cards (I'll trade ya two Clara Murdocks for one Marie Jansen) or the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issues of their day.

Interesting standards of beauty they had back in the 1880s. I wonder if Our Knocker customers were smoking more but enjoying it less.

f0662d4381363e5aa3c8ff91ebafc519--cigars     main-image

c6e44789c82de6cb53ef39d0055c710f--cigars     DPB869835.jpg

Our Knocker Cigar Cards: Actresses Series

 

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3 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Funny but that poster did make me think:  where did the term **** come from?    (as used for a woman's chest).

k*n*o*c*k*e*r*s  supposedly is a reference to a motion and one source says the slang term originated in the 1940's

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10 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Funny but that poster did make me think:  where did the term **** come from?    (as used for a woman's chest).

I have been told that it is because inordinate weight and lack of tone can cause a man to be knocked silly when lovemaking is vigorous in the woman-on-top position. 

I should perhaps note that the person who told me this has very little credibility but does make an amusing sort of sense from time to time.

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Rewatched  Zero Effect (1998) Hyper Neo Noir Riff on Sherlock Holmes

 

3n8AXR1Ma3WwkEZOiSAS8KydZwt.jpg

Written and directed by Jake Kasdan. cinematography by Bill Pope, music by The Greyboy Allstars. Full Soundtrack credits here.

The film stars Bill Pullman as Daryl Zero, Ben Stiller as Steve Arlo, Ryan O'Neal as Gregory Stark, Kim Dickens as Gloria Sullivan, Matt O'Toole as Kragan Vincent , and Angela Featherstone as Jess.

"The Case of the Man Who Got So Stressed-out Over His Lost Keys That He Eventually Had a Heart Attack And it Turned Out They Were in the Sofa All Along."

The Premise. Daryl Zero is "The Worlds Most Private Detective," "The Greatest Private Investigator In The World." Its mostly a riff on Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes with a dash of Nero Wolfe. 

In fact we may even venture to say Daryl Zero's powers of deduction exceeds Sherlock's and is more akin to Holmes' older brother Mycroft. Daryl is fond of disguises like Holmes, has multiple I.D.'s, and plays an electric guitar rather than a violin. Daryl also sings to his compositions and has a bit of a Bob Dylan sandpapery voice and style. Holmes used cocaine Daryl likes speed - bennies, uppers, goofballs. The nod to Nero Wolf is that Daryl rarely leaves his apartment and like Wolf's assistant Archie Goodwin has his secretary Steve Arlo doing a lot of the legwork.

A Clever Black Comedy Neo Noir, it's a real hoot!

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On 6/19/2022 at 9:24 AM, Swithin said:

I love [THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD 1935], having first seen it as a child, when it was part of the Shock Theater Universal package, introduced by Zacherley. It has a great cast and the sort of antique atmosphere that makes classic movies so appealing.  I agree about Zeffie Tilbury, she's great, as always. The Mystery of Edwin Drood was directed by Stuart Walker the same year -- 1935 -- that he directed Werewolf of London, which also features Zeffie, Ethel Griffies, and some of the same actors as Drood. 

Btw, Zeffie Tilbury's mother was Lydia Thompson, one of the great performers of the second half of the 19th century.

 

OMG! How could I not recognize ZEFFIE TILBURY as MRS MONCASTER from WEREWOLF OF LONDON! ?

She and MRS WHACK are the HEART AND SOUL of that movie!!!! (Which is one of my favorites)

I also did not realize that WEREWOLF and DROOD had the same director!

See the source image"I'm tellin yew love, 'TWAS Lon Chaney Jr. walkin w' The Queen!"

Werewolf of London (1935) - Photo Gallery - IMDb

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19 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Our Knocker Cigars were either the baseball cards (I'll trade ya two Clara Murdocks for one Marie Jansen) or the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issues of their day.

Interesting standards of beauty they had back in the 1880s. I wonder if Our Knocker customers were smoking more but enjoying it less.

f0662d4381363e5aa3c8ff91ebafc519--cigars     main-image

c6e44789c82de6cb53ef39d0055c710f--cigars     DPB869835.jpg

Our Knocker Cigar Cards: Actresses Series

 

damned if I don't learn something new here every time I log on...

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35 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OMG! How could I not recognize ZEFFIE TILBURY as MRS MONCASTER from WEREWOLF OF LONDON! ?

She and MRS WHACK are the HEART AND SOUL of that movie!!!! (Which is one of my favorites)

I remember reading somewhere that Mrs. Moncaster and Mrs. Whack were attempts to add/emulate "James Whale humor "into/in Werewolf of London.

Regarding Ethel Griffies ("Mrs. Whack"), she can also be seen in The Birds, as "Mrs. Bundy," the ornithologist.

793bdcc8b2c7569dbd8f9dad8df3d590.jpg

TB48_150.jpg&ehk=HAjzcNyy5wnrofqTQibOav7

 

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I apologize for making the conversation so DROODcentric (more or less), but in rewatching the 1935 MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD last night two things I failed to point out in my review leapt out at me:

1. EE CLIVE plays just about the exact same character [A HIGHLY SUPERCILIOUS [yet useless] TOWN OFFICIAL] in DROOD that he does in BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN and he is a HOOT. I imdb'd him and see that he was WELSH, ergo I am sure his POMPOUS ENGLISHMAN ROUTINE came from a place of TRUTH.

2. The MURDER in EDWIN DROOD happens on CHRISTMAS EVE (in the book and the movie), and there are some nice, ominous shots of the SKY DARKENING WITH CLOUDS as some carolers sing the line "all is calm, all is bright..."  from SILENT NIGHT. I mention this because- while not a horror movie- DROOD has got some effective macabre moments like this.

ALSO i love the irony that DICKENS is considered by some to be THE FATHER OF MODERN CHRISTMAS  but in the final story he told....

spoiler below

 

....a 40 something  man murders his nephew on Christmas Eve in order to marry the nephew's 18 year-old fiancee.

                                                          ...And you thought spending holidays with YOUR relatives sucked, huh?

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

                                                          ...And you thought spending holidays with YOUR relatives sucked, huh?

c8b7aea.jpg

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2 minutes ago, SansFin said:

c8b7aea.jpg

This reminds me in a roundabout way of 1964's What a Way to Go, the film where Shirley MacLaine played a much widowed woman. Husband #3, Robert Mitchum, died after he mistook a bull for a female cow and tried to milk it. Bad idea.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I apologize for making the conversation so DROODcentric (more or less), but in rewatching the 1935 MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD last night two things I failed to point out in my review leapt out at me:

1. EE CLIVE plays just about the exact same character [A HIGHLY SUPERCILIOUS [yet useless] TOWN OFFICIAL] in DROOD that he does in BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN and he is a HOOT. I imdb'd him and see that he was WELSH, ergo I am sure his POMPOUS ENGLISHMAN ROUTINE came from a place of TRUTH.

2. The MURDER in EDWIN DROOD happens on CHRISTMAS EVE (in the book and the movie), and there are some nice, ominous shots of the SKY DARKENING WITH CLOUDS as some carolers sing the line "all is calm, all is bright..."  from SILENT NIGHT. I mention this because- while not a horror movie- DROOD has got some effective macabre moments like this.

 

No need to apologize, it's a great film and doesn't come up that often. The whole cast shines: In addition to those mentioned, Douglass Montgomery, Heather Angel, Francis L. Sullivan, Walter Kingsford, etc.

Btw, at the risk of mentioning something that everyone knows, Zeffie Tilbury played Grandma in The Grapes of Wrath. That's not an opium pipe she's smoking (I don't think).

79d6bd976d7b6a62f811e0fc148dc3e7.jpg

Zeffie Tilbury in The Grapes of Wrath (1940)

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Last night was our season closer, we screened FOOTLIGHT PARADE '33.  While most of us have seen this several times, many in our audience had not seen it in years, if ever.

Cagney's electric energy propelled the thin story, while Joan Blondell was her adorable self as his level headed, yet hopelessly smitten assistant that stole everyone's heart. I was reminded how incredibly annoying both Ruby Keeler & Dick Powell were, Powell is particularly goofy with silents-like expressions. I never understood how anyone (esp Blondell who married him in RL) could be attracted to him, he seemed like such a pouf. Notable Frank McHugh and child Billy Barty added a lighthearted comedic support to the pretty thin story.

I fully expected the audience to howl over the theater-to-theater bus rush, but they didn't. The audience was so mesmerized by the preposterous musical numbers, they just ate it up.. cheered, laughed, gasped & groaned. When the Military unfurled the flag, then Roosevelt, the audience applauded. When THE END came up on the screen, I never heard such strong applause & cheers.

While modern filmmakers pay homage to Berkely's musical numbers, no one can really replicate the creative, diverse imagination of Busby Berkely's choreography & direction and this movie is his pinnacle. My 93 year old Mother (who was 2 when the movie was released) left the theater laughing & commenting how FUN this movie was & how much she enjoyed it. You can't get any better than that.

tumblr_mmvkxl65BQ1rs1xsxo2_500.gif

footlight_parade_by_a_waterfall.jpg

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50 minutes ago, Tikisoo said:

Last night was our season closer, we screened FOOTLIGHT PARADE '33.  While most of us have seen this several times, many in our audience had not seen it in years, if ever.

Cagney's electric energy propelled the thin story, while Joan Blondell was her adorable self as his level headed, yet hopelessly smitten assistant that stole everyone's heart. I was reminded how incredibly annoying both Ruby Keeler & Dick Powell were, Powell is particularly goofy with silents-like expressions. I never understood how anyone (esp Blondell who married him in RL) could be attracted to him, he seemed like such a pouf. Notable Frank McHugh and child Billy Barty added a lighthearted comedic support to the pretty thin story.

I fully expected the audience to howl over the theater-to-theater bus rush, but they didn't. The audience was so mesmerized by the preposterous musical numbers, they just ate it up.. cheered, laughed, gasped & groaned. When the Military unfurled the flag, then Roosevelt, the audience applauded. When THE END came up on the screen, I never heard such strong applause & cheers.

While modern filmmakers pay homage to Berkely's musical numbers, no one can really replicate the creative, diverse imagination of Busby Berkely's choreography & direction and this movie is his pinnacle. My 93 year old Mother (who was 2 when the movie was released) left the theater laughing & commenting how FUN this movie was & how much she enjoyed it. You can't get any better than that.

tumblr_mmvkxl65BQ1rs1xsxo2_500.gif

footlight_parade_by_a_waterfall.jpg

When I see this type old movie, I always wonder what all the dancers did during the rest of the time.  There couldn't have been that many movies calling for that many dancers.

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author's note: every now and then, I commit the sin of posting a partial review of a film I have yet to see in its entirety....honestly, I know it's bad form, but I am not a person blessed with a bottomless well of patience, and sometimes I just need to come to you guys with "has anyone else seen this thing and was anyone else bored to tears or am I missing something?" in order to know whether or not it's worth returning to try and make it all the way through.

in spite of really loving FANTASY and HORROR FILMS of the 30's and 40's, I have never seen DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY (1934?)- which TCM showed as a spotlight on director MITCHELL LEISSON (who directed a lot of interesting films.)

while THE SETS ARE FABULOUS and THE PRINT IS GREAT and the LIGHTING IS GLORIOUS (it was a PARAMOUNT FILM and everyone and everything in it  has that PARAMOUNT "mistiness" about them)- i only made it about 40 minutes in before i had to check out because DANG did it DRAG and also, while I like FREDRIC MARCH as an actor, MAN he was not good in this and his accent was very very bad.

am I wrong about this one? Do I need to give another shot?

I really do appreciate TCM showing this one though.

See the source image

 

 

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Early Frederic March can be a little too silent movie emo style for me too. I'd say if it bored you to the point of not caring, you made the right call for you. 

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1 hour ago, ElCid said:

When I see this type old movie, I always wonder what all the dancers did during the rest of the time.  There couldn't have been that many movies calling for that many dancers.

If they were on contract, they could always be used as bit players (if they could even half-way act) or extras, I suppose.   SAG didn't form until 1933, and really didn't have much power until 1937, so the regimented labor rules, job categories, pay scales, etc.  they have today did not exist then.  The studios could pretty much do what they wanted with their employees.

The studios made lots of shorts and B pictures back then that rarely see the light of day today, or have been lost.  A lot of the shorts were what we'd call music videos today, so they might use some dancers.   Otherwise, I guess there was also the nightclub circuit back then that would have floor shows, though you'd think most would consider that a stepping stone into the movies.  It probably worked both ways.   Remember, in Singin' in the Rain, Kathy Selden (Debbie Reynolds) worked as a floor show dancer as part of a troupe that would be hired out for parties?

When you search IMDb for US releases, say in 1933, you get 1,124 titles.  That's about 21 titles per week on average.  104  of the 1,124 have "Musical" as it's genre in IMDb (subtracting out the animated works).   Lots of work to go around back then. 

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

author's note: every now and then, I commit the sin of posting a partial review of a film I have yet to see in its entirety....honestly, I know it's bad form, but I am not a person blessed with a bottomless well of patience, and sometimes I just need to come to you guys with "has anyone else seen this thing and was anyone else bored to tears or am I missing something?" in order to know whether or not it's worth returning to try and make it all the way through.

in spite of really loving FANTASY and HORROR FILMS of the 30's and 40's, I have never seen DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY (1934?)- which TCM showed as a spotlight on director MITCHELL LEISSON (who directed a lot of interesting films.)

while THE SETS ARE FABULOUS and THE PRINT IS GREAT and the LIGHTING IS GLORIOUS (it was a PARAMOUNT FILM and everyone and everything in it  has that PARAMOUNT "mistiness" about them)- i only made it about 40 minutes in before i had to check out because DANG did it DRAG and also, while I like FREDRIC MARCH as an actor, MAN he was not good in this and his accent was very very bad.

am I wrong about this one? Do I need to give another shot?

I really do appreciate TCM showing this one though.

See the source image

 

 

I rather liked it when I saw it a few years back, and found the film to be rather ethereal and fascinating. it has great atmosphere and it is very touching. At only 79 minutes its a mid-30s gem. It was remade over 60 years later as Meet Joe Black (1998), which was boated out to 172 minutes and lost a lot of money when the $90 million film grossed only $44 million in the domestic market, costing some Universal executives their jobs when it was compounded with the financial losses incurred from the ill-advised remake of Psycho, the surprisingly dark Babe: Pig in the City, and Primary Colors, which got upstaged by the Monica Lewinsky scandal. For the record, the later version starred Brad Pitt, Anthony Hopkins, Claire Forlani, and Marcia Gay Harden (Homosexual Hard On)

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MV5BMjIzNzMyMjQ0MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNDc2

Early Summer from 1951, a Japanese film with English subtitles

 
 
Acclaimed Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu seemed to make the same movie over and over again, except he didn't. Almost always about a "normal" post-war middle-class family who, usually, wants to marry off a daughter, Ozu's films explore different nuances and angles of the same broad story. 
 
His pictures are more journeys than destinations. Ozu's filmmaking shines when looking at a regular family's day-to-day lives buffeted, as all families' lives are now and then, by the occasional big-decision or crisis moments. 
 
For a Western audience, almost seven decades after these movies were made, not only do the stories hold up on their own, but they are greatly enhanced by the incredible window they provide into a post-war Japan: A country trying to regain its footing while finding a balance between older Japanese traditions and encroaching Western influences.
 
In Early Summer, the Mamiya family - a mother and father, their unmarried twenty-eight-year-old daughter, their married son, his wife and two young children - live happily together. While they bump into each other a bit as all inter-generational families living under the same roof will, they have no real problems other than their unmarried daughter, played by Setsuko Hara.
 
Hara is a young modern woman for 1951 Japan: she has a good office job, goes out and parties with her girlfriends (who drink like modern young girls, i.e., a lot) and is indifferent to marrying. But she is also respectful to her family, deferential in an of-that-time Japanese way and she does more than her share of housework, even helping out with her brother's children. 
 
While the story is about the family's efforts to find Hara a husband - her boss and brother are trying to set her up with a successful forty-year-old bachelor - the movie's real joy is its view into this family where traditional-Japanese and modern-Western cultures are blending in a surprisingly harmonious way.
 
Men and women switch back and forth between Western and Japanese clothing seamlessly, even intraday. The young boys wear baseball hats, play with model trains and are pretty spoiled (in a very Western way), but equally know when to pull back and be respectful Japanese children. 
 
Businessmen blend American and Japanese approaches (this is three-plus decades before the West will try to copy the "Japanese model" for business success). Social events, from birthday parties to weddings, have both 1950s-American and traditional-Japanese customs, all somehow comfortably entwined. 
 
Eastern-versus-Western values, though, drive the movie's central conflict that begins when the family tries to set Hara up in the old way of relatives finding her a match. Once the prospect's background has been researched and approved by the family, Hara is supposed to accept its decision, but, and this is the rub, she keeps putting it off.
 
In most American (although, not-Wasp) families, this major disagreement would be openly argued about with, in some households, plenty of yelling and door slamming. But in Japan in 1951, disagreement is, often avoided and, then, only discussed in nothing more than some harsh tones at critical moments. 
 
For most of the time, it's ignored or only referenced indirectly. While modern Western psychology, with its belief in never leaving a thought unsaid or an emotion unexpressed, avers this is unhealthy, the Japanese approach allows the family to function pleasantly, day to day, even during times of meaningful disagreement. 
 
(Spoiler alert for the next two paragraphs) In the climax, Hara cuts the Gordian Knot by rejecting the family-approved suitor at the same time she agrees, without consulting the family, to marry a family friend and widower. 
 
The family is flummoxed, as they all seem hurt that their choice was rejected. Yet they are also cautiously happy that Hara is getting married to a good man, although they are a bit put off because he has a child from his first marriage.
 
Early Summer works because it has a good story driven by complex characters whom you quickly come to care about. It is equally enjoyable as time travel to a post-war Japan. Less than a decade after WWII ended, Japan was already on its way to somehow blending traditional Japanese values with modern Western ones into an incredibly successful cultural, social and economic model.  
 
 

 

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55 minutes ago, Fading Fast said:

MV5BMjIzNzMyMjQ0MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNDc2

Early Summer from 1951, a Japanese film with English subtitles

 
 
Acclaimed Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu seemed to make the same movie over and over again, except he didn't. Almost always about a "normal" post-war middle-class family who, usually, wants to marry off a daughter, Ozu's films explore different nuances and angles of the same broad story. 
 
His pictures are more journeys than destinations. Ozu's filmmaking shines when looking at a regular family's day-to-day lives buffeted, as all families' lives are now and then, by the occasional big-decision or crisis moments. 
 
For a Western audience, almost seven decades after these movies were made, not only do the stories hold up on their own, but they are greatly enhanced by the incredible window they provide into a post-war Japan: A country trying to regain its footing while finding a balance between older Japanese traditions and encroaching Western influences.
 
In Early Summer, the Mamiya family - a mother and father, their unmarried twenty-eight-year-old daughter, their married son, his wife and two young children - live happily together. While they bump into each other a bit as all inter-generational families living under the same roof will, they have no real problems other than their unmarried daughter, played by Setsuko Hara.
 
Hara is a young modern woman for 1951 Japan: she has a good office job, goes out and parties with her girlfriends (who drink like modern young girls, i.e., a lot) and is indifferent to marrying. But she is also respectful to her family, deferential in an of-that-time Japanese way and she does more than her share of housework, even helping out with her brother's children. 
 
While the story is about the family's efforts to find Hara a husband - her boss and brother are trying to set her up with a successful forty-year-old bachelor - the movie's real joy is its view into this family where traditional-Japanese and modern-Western cultures are blending in a surprisingly harmonious way.
 
Men and women switch back and forth between Western and Japanese clothing seamlessly, even intraday. The young boys wear baseball hats, play with model trains and are pretty spoiled (in a very Western way), but equally know when to pull back and be respectful Japanese children. 
 
Businessmen blend American and Japanese approaches (this is three-plus decades before the West will try to copy the "Japanese model" for business success). Social events, from birthday parties to weddings, have both 1950s-American and traditional-Japanese customs, all somehow comfortably entwined. 
 
Eastern-versus-Western values, though, drive the movie's central conflict that begins when the family tries to set Hara up in the old way of relatives finding her a match. Once the prospect's background has been researched and approved by the family, Hara is supposed to accept its decision, but, and this is the rub, she keeps putting it off.
 
In most American (although, not-Wasp) families, this major disagreement would be openly argued about with, in some households, plenty of yelling and door slamming. But in Japan in 1951, disagreement is, often avoided and, then, only discussed in nothing more than some harsh tones at critical moments. 
 
For most of the time, it's ignored or only referenced indirectly. While modern Western psychology, with its belief in never leaving a thought unsaid or an emotion unexpressed, avers this is unhealthy, the Japanese approach allows the family to function pleasantly, day to day, even during times of meaningful disagreement. 
 
(Spoiler alert for the next two paragraphs) In the climax, Hara cuts the Gordian Knot by rejecting the family-approved suitor at the same time she agrees, without consulting the family, to marry a family friend and widower. 
 
The family is flummoxed, as they all seem hurt that their choice was rejected. Yet they are also cautiously happy that Hara is getting married to a good man, although they are a bit put off because he has a child from his first marriage.
 
Early Summer works because it has a good story driven by complex characters whom you quickly come to care about. It is equally enjoyable as time travel to a post-war Japan. Less than a decade after WWII ended, Japan was already on its way to somehow blending traditional Japanese values with modern Western ones into an incredibly successful cultural, social and economic model.  
 
 

 

Haven't seen this film so thanks for pointing it out.    Maybe I'll find time to watch it with my Japanese mother.    Note that just recently I found a young Japanese gal to help take care of my 89 year old mom.     It is great to see the two talk Japanese and she makes my mom Japanese meals.      

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3 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

Haven't seen this film so thanks for pointing it out.    Maybe I'll find time to watch it with my Japanese mother.    Note that just recently I found a young Japanese gal to help take care of my 89 year old mom.     It is great to see the two talk Japanese and she makes my mom Japanese meals.      

That's nice to hear. My girlfriend's and my mom are both 89 - and both require some help, so we understand how you feel if you found someone who your mom is happy with.

TCM ran a series of Japanese movies awhile back that I'm, finally, getting caught up on. I've believe I've posted a few others before. So far, they have all been really good movies. I hope you get to watch this one or one of the others with you mom. 

 

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Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964)

I first saw this movie as a child, probably around 10 years old. I remember that I really liked it, and one scene really scaring me. 


Just finished watching it again a few minutes ago. It was surprisingly still good, seen through adult eyes this time. I can't figure out why I liked it as a child-there's no monsters, cartoon violence, or cute little singing animals!

Lead roles played by Paul Mantee and Victor Lundin, who both had decently long careers without becoming stars. Adam West also appears briefly. 

Directed by Byron Haskin, who also directed Too Late for Tears and The War of the Worlds.

Mantee crashes on Mars, and learns to survive. He ends up meeting Lundin, who plays a runaway slave of an alien race. Mantee protects him, teaches him english, and they become friends. They flee the aliens, have a perilous journey across a desert and on to a polar icecap. Just as looks like they are about to perish,  they don't. I refuse to say how-ya gotta watch it.

The best thing about this movie wasn't the sci-fi stuff. It was the growing friendship between the Navy guy and the alien slave. Dialogue was well written, and both actors delivered really nice kind of laid back performances. 

Super saturated Technicolor, at times too much so. Alien spaceships were obviously animations, but very well done. The spaceship sounds were EXACTLY  like those used in the 1950's version of War of the Worlds. 

There were a few technical problems in the movie. For instance, electrical instrument props that worked without any power source. The transitions from studio scenes to location shots were crude. For instance, repeatedly the characters would be under real desert daylight closeup, only to be shown in a wider shot under a night sky with a perpetual red horizon. 
 

DFB8C90F-0988-433F-B0E8-87E3E7105740.jpeg.faa334b4b9acc3422e4e41df77688d18.jpeg


 


 



 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Grumpytoad said:

There were a few technical problems in the movie. For instance, electrical instrument props that worked without any power source.

You mean like cel phones? Maybe the movie unknowingly forecasted the future!

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11 hours ago, Fading Fast said:

That's nice to hear. My girlfriend's and my mom are both 89 - and both require some help, so we understand how you feel if you found someone who your mom is happy with.

TCM ran a series of Japanese movies awhile back that I'm, finally, getting caught up on. I've believe I've posted a few others before. So far, they have all been really good movies. I hope you get to watch this one or one of the others with you mom. 

 

I seem to recall coming across A LOT of early KUROSAWA (sp?) films and some other classic 50's JAPANESE TITLES on TUBI

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