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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

It's on AMAZON PRIME, I bought it** for $1.99!!!!!!!!

(**as a digital copy, insofar as I know, it's still not out on DVD.)

 

1 hour ago, Tikisoo said:

Ugh, I've been trying to see this movie for YEARS, TCM never shows it. And that picture of Bette with black wig & devil horn barrettes just seals it- OY!!

The only DVD is a disc from italy, but you would need an all-regions DVD player to even play it.

You could also go here. 

https://filmboards.com/board/10041172/

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2 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

Ugh, I've been trying to see this movie for YEARS, TCM never shows it. And that picture of Bette with black wig & devil horn barrettes just seals it- OY!!

Beyond the Forest on the Web

https://ok.ru/video/258644708003

https://ok.ru/video/995923397300

https://ok.ru/video/46902807106

https://vk.com/wall206695354_3

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10 hours ago, AndreaDoria said:

and I thought Bette's vain southern bell was much better than Vivian  Leigh's.

Joanne Woodward played an entire southern carillon in The Three Faces of Eve.

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I just watched this week two of the most W T F  films I've seen this year thus far:

The Hotel New Hampshire (1984)  Don't know how i've never heard of this film, but according to ScreenPix it's a cult classic and it has an all-star cast of Beau Bridges, Jodie Foster,  Rob Lowe as the main star, Matthew Modine, Nastassja Kinski, Seth Green, Wilford Brimley, Wallace Shawn and Amanda Plummer.  From the get-go with a real-life bear (called State Of Maine) driving a motorcycle, this film is just crazy all over the place.  Not quite sure how to describe the plot but it follows the trials of a large family over the course of a few years and in multiple countries who experience loss and hurdles.  Towards the start Foster's character gets gang-raped by Modine and their classmates, and there's a sexual relationship between Lowe and Foster's sibling characters which is never really highlighted as the shock it should be.  Apparently Modine accidentally broke Lowe's nose in a scene and the director was so **** that he dubbed over all of his lines with another actor.  Critics appear to have liked this film but it lost money and the studio was to blame for a lot of that as they didn't know how to market it and they put out their promotional images using a picture of a cartoon bear so no one knew what the film was about.

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971) Been going through Criterion's Beyond Blaxploitation collection (more to come on that in another post) and i wanted to watch this one as i'd never seen a Melvin Van Peebles film.  Apparently there's quite a story around the making of this (his son made a feature on it where he plays his father).  The film starts off with the titular character as a child, played by his real-life young son, naked and having sex with an older woman which was rather uncomfortable to watch TBH.  The character gets his name from this incident due assumingly because he can 'put his back into' making love and therefore quite talented at it.  In fact having s e x seems to be the one skill the character has that he uses to his ability and at one point when he's threatened by a biker gang and he gets to choose the method of how he battles with a woman member of the gang, he chooses to have a s e x battle.  The editing and music all stand out.  The ending sets up a sequel but to my knowledge there isn't one.  There's a scene with black transexuals in what i assume to be a brothel or a sex show  where Sweetback works at, and he seemingly has sex with the transexual, and i'm starting to notice a trend in the blaxploitation films where black transexuals pop up quite a bit, so i'm curious if this is part of the inner-city black experience.  Obviously in the early 70's it wasn't as common as it is these days.  I liked the film and the music throughout and thought it was funny that the main star of the film in the credits is 'the black community'.  I'll probably watch the feature film that Mario Van Peeples made on this film and some of Melvin's other films.

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The Silencers (1966) -- 6/10

Supposedly a James Bond spoof, at many times The Silencers feels like an issue of Playboy brought to the screen. It's 1966, so there isn't any actual nudity, but given the skimpiness of the women's costumes, it feels pretty close. It lends a very uncomfortable air to the film. I don't even think the Bond series was so carnal when it came to its costuming, and with the exception of one character (more on her in a second), the female characterization is as stiff and fake as a Barbie doll. Against all this, we have Dean Martin as a womanizing spy. This was a hit and spawned a few sequels for him, very poorly reviewed ones at that. he's very laid back in the role, and that might be the right position in a film as outrageous as this one. He's somewhat likable even with his caddish ways. Victor Bueno chews scenery as a "Chinese' villain, although he could never pass for it.  Cyd Charisse appears briefly in a flesh colored outfit with tassels everywhere; its kind of like a statement that the Hollywood class of the past decades was dead. The film's saving grace though is Stella Stevens as an accident-prone woman who becomes the film's second central character. True, she too is degraded through skimpy outfits, but her performance is delightful, charming and filled with expertly handled physical comedy. I'm actually raising the rating a little bit based on her alone. But overall, this is a piece of the swinging 60s that might not deserve to be unearthed.

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1 minute ago, Shank Asu said:

I just watched this week two of the most **** films I've seen this year thus far:

The Hotel New Hampshire (1984)  Don't know how i've never heard of this film, but according to ScreenPix it's a cult classic and it has an all-star cast of Beau Bridges, Jodie Foster,  Rob Lowe as the main star, Matthew Modine, Nastassja Kinski, Seth Green, Wilford Brimley, Wallace Shawn and Amanda Plummer.  From the get-go with a real-life bear (called State Of Maine) driving a motorcycle, this film is just crazy all over the place.  Not quite sure how to describe the plot but it follows the trials of a large family over the course of a few years and in multiple countries who experience loss and hurdles.  Towards the start Foster's character gets gang-raped by Modine and their classmates, and there's a sexual relationship between Lowe and Foster's sibling characters which is never really highlighted as the shock it should be.  Apparently Modine accidentally broke Lowe's nose in a scene and the director was so **** that he dubbed over all of his lines with another actor.  Critics appear to have liked this film but it lost money and the studio was to blame for a lot of that as they didn't know how to market it and they put out their promotional images using a picture of a cartoon bear so no one knew what the film was about.

My father still holds a bit of a grudge over Jodie Foster over this film. He didn't know what it was about, and he walked out after the siblings got too close for comfort. He still rages against it as one of the worst films ever made, almost 4 decades after his unsuccessful viewing of it, which was reportedly, the film's only screening in Utah.

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Devil's Cargo (1948)

 

A man admits to The Falcon that he killed a man who was overly friendly with his wife and then offers The Falcon $500 to hold a key for him until the legal entanglements of the matter are settled. The Falcon pockets the money and calls the police.

John Calvert is not George Sanders and the production company obviously did not have the budget which RKO could throw at a movie but this is a delightful little picture despite all that. It quickly acknowledges that it is a bit of fluff and does not try for edge-of-seat tension or high drama. This Falcon does not have a sidekick nor a lovely bit of scrumptious trying to marry him. He has instead a reasonably intelligent dog and a loyal landlady. 

The plot was sufficiently twisty even although it was not high mystery. I found the pacing quite good. The camerawork was generally very workmanlike. 

An hour of gentle entertainment and a few smiles.

7.3/10

 

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Tomorrow at Seven (1933)
 

A crime writer and a woman share embarrassing opinions of each others' position before becoming embroiled in the hunt for an elusive serial murderer.

The saving grace of this movie is the familiar faces: Frank McHugh, Allen Jenkins, Henry Stephenson, Grant Mitchell and Charles Middleton should be familiar to all who watch 1930s B-movies. They do tend to walk over each other a little bit but that is fine because it detracts from the movie's lack of focus or plot. 

Watching this was not the worst way I have spent an hour.

5.4/10

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7 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Tomorrow at Seven (1933)
 

A crime writer and a woman share embarrassing opinions of each others' position before becoming embroiled in the hunt for an elusive serial murderer.

The saving grace of this movie is the familiar faces: Frank McHugh, Allen Jenkins, Henry Stephenson, Grant Mitchell and Charles Middleton should be familiar to all who watch 1930s B-movies. They do tent to walk over each other a little bit but that is fine because it detracts from the movie's lack of focus or plot. 

Watching this was not the worst way I have spent an hour.

5.4/10

The films stars Chester Morris;  I guess he didn't impress you much.   Note that McHugh and Jenkins would sign long term  contracts with Warner Bros and this film was one of the last they made for another studio,  until the 50s. 

 

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3 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I just watched this week two of the most W T F  films I've seen this year thus far:

The Hotel New Hampshire (1984)  Don't know how i've never heard of this film, but according to ScreenPix it's a cult classic and it has an all-star cast of Beau Bridges, Jodie Foster,  Rob Lowe as the main star, Matthew Modine, Nastassja Kinski, Seth Green, Wilford Brimley, Wallace Shawn and Amanda Plummer.  From the get-go with a real-life bear (called State Of Maine) driving a motorcycle, this film is just crazy all over the place.

It was John Irving's big long-awaited second book after The World According to Garp (1982), which Robin Williams, Glenn Close and George Roy Hill managed to sort out into a philosophical coherence (no easy task, with Irving's Vonnegut-like style of random picaresque life-stories and literary side-anecdotes), so Hotel got the big-budget greenlight.

But where Hill had an easygoing, laidback style for taking Irving's absurdities as part of life, here, Tony Richardson wanted to go overboard in showing us how Ironically Quirky and Eccentric it was, and overboard he went.   I'd like to say we never got another John Irving movie after that until Michael Caine in The Cider House Rules (1999), but we did get a distinctly under-the-radar adaptation of Irving's "A Prayer for Owen Meany" in Simon Birch (1998).

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7 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

The films stars Chester Morris;  I guess he didn't impress you much.   Note that McHugh and Jenkins would sign long term  contracts with Warner Bros and this film was one of the last they made for another studio,  until the 50s. 

 

I find Chester Morris a serviceable actor in roles such as his beantown crow series. He was adequate in this movie because it was the same basic character. He is otherwise not to my taste and I do not find him handsome, charming or personable. 

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8 hours ago, SansFin said:

I find Chester Morris a serviceable actor in roles such as his beantown crow series. He was adequate in this movie because it was the same basic character. He is otherwise not to my taste and I do not find him handsome, charming or personable. 

Someone told CHESTER MORRIS early in his career to CLENCH HIS JAW and it became a signature for him, especially in profile.

See the source image

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Thatgirllogo.jpg

That Girl 1966-1971 

An aspiring actress Ann Marie (Marlo Thomas) tries to make it on her own in New York City.

I just went through the whole TV series on Freevee over the past few months. The show still holds up as one of the funniest of the 1960s sitcoms. Marlo Thomas has great comic timing and I think she can be put up there with other great female TV comedy legends like Lucille Ball and Carol Burnett. She has a funny, scratchy voice that sometimes gets squeaky when she gets excited. Ted Bessell plays her loyal boyfriend and he makes a great foil. He is great at tossing off a quip when she gets into a jam. Lew Parker has the occasional role of her over protective dad. He is a great blustering character and has some of the funniest moments when he sometimes finds her in compromising (but innocent) situations. Rosemary DeCamp plays her calm, understanding mother.

There are occasional guest stars like Ethel Merman (twice) and Barry Sullivan as himself. He is in a play with Ann and she has to slap him in a scene but can't bring herself to do it. Others include Carroll O'Connor as a lecherous opera singer, it is fun to see Archie Bunker with a beard and Italian accent. Marlo's real life dad Danny Thomas plays a funny cameo as a priest in one episode and plays himself in a later one. He and his daughter sing "Together (Where Ever We Go)"

Any other fans of this show?

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I remember my sister and I watching  That Girl when it was in production. Later, I tuned in for the syndicated reruns in the mid 70s. I liked seeing the different cold openings the writers would  come up with to set up someone pointing at Marlo and saying, "That girl!" (I have mimicked that bit in work and social situations when appropriate. Nobody ever gets it, but that's part of the fun.)

I also remember thinking Marlo got a whole lot prettier in the later episodes after she lost the flip-up do, but I just went photo searching and actually, she was a cutie with the 60s hair, too. It was a good show. 

marlo-hair-crazy1-1024x637.jpg

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52 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Thatgirllogo.jpg

That Girl 1966-1971 

An aspiring actress Ann Marie (Marlo Thomas) tries to make it on her own in New York City.

I just went through the whole TV series on Freevee over the past few months. The show still holds up as one of the funniest of the 1960s sitcoms. Marlo Thomas has great comic timing and I think she can be put up there with other great female TV comedy legends like Lucille Ball and Carol Burnett. She has a funny, scratchy voice that sometimes gets squeaky when she gets excited. Ted Bessell plays her loyal boyfriend and he makes a great foil. He is great at tossing off a quip when she gets into a jam. Lew Parker has the occasional role of her over protective dad. He is a great blustering character and has some of the funniest moments when he sometimes finds her in compromising (but innocent) situations. Rosemary DeCamp plays her calm, understanding mother.

There are occasional guest stars like Ethel Merman (twice) and Barry Sullivan as himself. He is in a play with Ann and she has to slap him in a scene but can't bring herself to do it. Others include Carroll O'Connor as a lecherous opera singer, it is fun to see Archie Bunker with a beard and Italian accent. Marlo's real life dad Danny Thomas plays a funny cameo as a priest in one episode and plays himself in a later one. He and his daughter sing "Together (Where Ever We Go)"

Any other fans of this show?

Not on my part.  I watched some original episodes and then much later some reruns.  Just couldn't get into it.  The stories seemed silly and she was even sillier.

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9 hours ago, SansFin said:

I find Chester Morris a serviceable actor in roles such as his beantown crow series. He was adequate in this movie because it was the same basic character. He is otherwise not to my taste and I do not find him handsome, charming or personable. 

Beantown crow series:   I LOVE that since one can't use the actual name of this serial due to the auto censor.   

I'm lukewarm about Morris but he was good in that serial and a few  other film roles during a fairly robust career.

 

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18 hours ago, EricJ said:

 

It was John Irving's big long-awaited second book after The World According to Garp (1982), which Robin Williams, Glenn Close and George Roy Hill managed to sort out into a philosophical coherence (no easy task, with Irving's Vonnegut-like style of random picaresque life-stories and literary side-anecdotes), so Hotel got the big-budget greenlight.

But where Hill had an easygoing, laidback style for taking Irving's absurdities as part of life, here, Tony Richardson wanted to go overboard in showing us how Ironically Quirky and Eccentric it was, and overboard he went.   I'd like to say we never got another John Irving movie after that until Michael Caine in The Cider House Rules (1999), but we did get a distinctly under-the-radar adaptation of Irving's "A Prayer for Owen Meany" in Simon Birch (1998).

Must admit I'm not familiar with Irving and haven't seen The World According to Garp, but that's some good backstory to the production.

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Been watching the Beyond Blaxploitation collection on the Criterion Channel this past week.  Four films I've watched so far are:

Trick Baby (1972)

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971) Mentioned in a previous post.

Across 110th Street (1972)

Black Belt Jones (1974)

I've enjoyed all of them so far but my favorite in this bunch is Across 110th Street with an older Anthony Quinn.  Part noir with some violent and bloody scenes, memorable ending and great soundtrack.

I'm not well versed with this genre and i'm wondering if these are 'beyond' blaxploitation, if they are somewhat outliers of it.  If anyone has recommendations for great blaxploitation films beyond the Shaft series, Superfly and Cleopatra Jones, i'm all ears.

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8 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Thatgirllogo.jpg

That Girl 1966-1971 

An aspiring actress Ann Marie (Marlo Thomas) tries to make it on her own in New York City.

I just went through the whole TV series on Freevee over the past few months. The show still holds up as one of the funniest of the 1960s sitcoms. Marlo Thomas has great comic timing and I think she can be put up there with other great female TV comedy legends like Lucille Ball and Carol Burnett. She has a funny, scratchy voice that sometimes gets squeaky when she gets excited. Ted Bessell plays her loyal boyfriend and he makes a great foil. He is great at tossing off a quip when she gets into a jam. Lew Parker has the occasional role of her over protective dad. He is a great blustering character and has some of the funniest moments when he sometimes finds her in compromising (but innocent) situations. Rosemary DeCamp plays her calm, understanding mother.

There are occasional guest stars like Ethel Merman (twice) and Barry Sullivan as himself. He is in a play with Ann and she has to slap him in a scene but can't bring herself to do it. Others include Carroll O'Connor as a lecherous opera singer, it is fun to see Archie Bunker with a beard and Italian accent. Marlo's real life dad Danny Thomas plays a funny cameo as a priest in one episode and plays himself in a later one. He and his daughter sing "Together (Where Ever We Go)"

Any other fans of this show?

I'm a fan of it. It's one of the most charming of sitcoms and Marlo Thomas is a delight in the center role. it still airs 6 days a week in my era. I love it. 

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